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iiiiiiiiii minimi ;nia 

E007 1SDES71 3 

California State Library 






SAN FRANCISCO 



ews 



letter 








An investment of over 




What to do 
when a Light 



goes out 



If the trouble is with a single Lamp, it 
may be due either to a broken filament 
in the Lamp or to a defective Socket. 

Often a Lamp with a broken filament 
can be temporarily restored to service 
by tapping it lightly. It is well to try an- 
other Lamp in the same Socket. Also 
try the "dead" Lamp in a different 
Socket. These tests will determine 
whether the fault is with the Lamp or 
the Socket. 

If the trouble is in the Socket it is better 
to send for an electrician than to try to 
make the repair yourself. 



PACIFIC GAS and ELECTRIC COMPANY 

J> • Q- • an d J£ • 



PACIFIC SERVICE 



One Hundred Million Dollars in Bonds 

(Over S7<y C in U. S., State, County mid Municipal Obligations) 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 
Head Office (San Francisco) and Branches 

Bank of Italy 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL TRUST 

June 29, 1925 

RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate....$131,829,092.36 

Other Loans and Discounts 83,364,593.56 $215,193,680.92 



United States Bonds and Certificates 

of Indebtedness $ 76,501,075.39 

State, County and Municipal Bonds 14,922,141.45 

Other Bonds and Securities 12,054.433.55 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 675,000.00 



TOTAL U. S. AND OTHER SECURITIES 104,152,650.39 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank $ 14,948,284.03 

Cash and Due from Other Banks 22,299,282.46 



TOTAL CASH AXD DUE FROM BANKS 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures and Safe De- 
posit Vaults (Ninety-four Banking Offices in 
sixty-five California Cities) 

Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of 

Credit and Acceptances 

Interest Earned — Uncollected 

Employes' Pension Fund (Actual Values $193,312.77) 
Standing on the Books at 

Other Resources 



37,247,566:49 



S.2SS 
829 

1.696. 

2.943, 



94 



480.05 
,451.64 

223.33 
404.11 

1 .00 

069.15 



TOTAL RESOURCES $370,445,532.08 

LIABILITIES 

DEPOSITS: Savings $240,474,336.05 

Commercial 97,504,255.61 



Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected but Not Earned 

Letters of Credit, Acceptances and Time Drafts.. 



CAPITAL PAID IN. 

SURPLUS 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

Interest Earned but Not Collected. 



$337,978,651.66 
619,824.45 

67.889.40 
1,696,223.33 

$34H,362,5SS.S4 

17.500,000.00 

6, i. i." i 

3,639,539.13 
2.943,404.11 



,; \ JrdrlvL: viabilities $370,445,532 08 

All charge-offs, expenses and interest payable i<> end of half-year 
,'• • • hm>»hv^i deducted in above statement. 

••.":ST!ockii6ii>i?RS auxiliary corporation 

(The capital stock of 'iiis corporation is owned share for share by the 
stockholders <>f the Bank of ltalyi 

Invested Capital, $8,992,656.32 

The Combined Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits of 

both corporations, including interest earned by 

Bank of Italy, but not collected, 

$39,075,599.56 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 563,925 

Savings Deposits made to and including July 10, 1925, 
will earn interest from July 1, 1925 




Ert.btlshed July JO. I6M 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 4, 1925 



No. 1 



— O, SAY CAN YOU SFE 

* # * 

Why we shouldn't tell the truth without fear of con- 
sequence, on Independence Day' 

* * * 

Why we shouldn't park where we please? 

* * * 

— Why we should "STI >!'" if we want to go? 

* * * 

— Why we should "GO" if we want to stop? 

* * * 

Why we shouldn't express our different emotion 

this Day without limit? 

* * * 

— ( )r take a little drink anywhere we please? 

* * * 

— Or kiss our neighbor's wife if she appeals to us? 

* * * 

— Or tell a man what we think of him. when we know- 
that he knows that we know that he is lying? 

* * * 

— Why we should praise our host's pictures .or bric- 

a-brac or what not, when we think these things are 

execrable? 

* * * 

— Why we should listen to drivel for the sake of polite- 
ness? 

* * * 

— ( )r endure a guest who out-stays his welcome? 

* * » 

— Or trouble to take off our shoes when negotiating the 

staircase in the wee sma' hours ; 

* * * 

— If we don't like the face of the officer on the corner. 
why we should hesitate to tell hit- 

* * * 

—Why we must "detour" if we don't want to? 

* * * 

— Or "keep off the grass" if we like the feeling 

* * * 

— Why all censors shouldn't he shot at sunrise? 

* * * 

— Or long-haired reformers he strangled with their own 
hirsute adornment ? 

* * * 

— If looking for a job, why employers shouldn't be com- 
pelled to give references : 



— Here are expressed some sentiments taken from "The 
Flag of our Country" that are timely and inspiring on this 
particular Day : 

* * * 

— The welding together of all our national life assures 
unit}-. This is the cornerstone of our political liberty; it 
is the very essence of truth and justice; truth and justice 
reflected in the folds of the Flag of the United States. 

* * * 

— The blag of the United States stands for righteousness, 

and so points the way to moral leadership. Firm as a rock 
it stands, exemplifying the fundamental principles of self- 

gi i\ eminent. 

* * * 

— Live and breathe the spirit of Justice and Equality. De- 
sire only that which is rightfully thine. Stand squarely 
upon the rock of decency and by your action encourage a 
just and honorable man and womanhood. 

* * * 

Instill confidence in the stranger to self-government 
by doing all in your power to prove a sincere desire on 
your part to become a worthy advocate of the principles 
involved. Americans are judged not by what they say, 
but by what they do. It is well to see to it that we do not 
mislead or betray those who sick to emulate our example. 

* * * 

— We must see to it that there be no division of loyalty 
among those who enter our ports. We have generously 
opened our gates, but as they cross our portals each must 
be informed that unless tlu\ become American in word, 
thought anil deed, it would be far better had they remained 

at home. 

* * * 

— Let no-one underestimate the full significance of the 
word liberty. Too often we substitute license, and so voice 
contempt of the law. It is high time that we understand 
that liberty can be liberty only so long as it does not 
destroy the inalienable rights of the people. 

* * * 

— Every American citizen must champion the right, in 
order that Justice be done. He who defies the law defies 
the people, and by his action becomes a menace to society 
and a detriment to civilization. 

* * * 

It was the Flag of the United States, more than any 

other agency, that inspired the founders of the Republic to 
defend the priceless privileges enjoyed today. The Flag 
makes possible freedom of thought and action. The Flag 
guarantees to all people, obedient to the law, justice and 
protection. The Flag is. and ever will be. the mighty force 
that directs our faltering steps toward the heights of 
national great- 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 




The new immigration law is at 
Immigration Control work and the racial quality of the 
immigrants is being altered ac- 
cordingly. There is a very noticeable falling off in the 
number of immigrants from southern and eastern Europe 
and a marked increase in the relative numbers from north- 
ern and western Europe. The government is well satis- 
fied with the operation of the law. 

The first ten months of the law at work show that the 
southern and eastern immigration only totalled 26,000, 
while the northern and western amounted to 186,000. There 
were 43,504 British immigrants and 7,482 left the country. 
Irish came in to the number of 35.212, with 1,165 leaving 
the country'. 

As for the oriental immigration, concerning- which so 
much has been heard, there were 1,488 Chinese admitted, 
with an emigration of 2.703. Japanese admissions were 
608. with an emigration of 983. 

The whole matter is. however, in bv no means an assured 
state. We are not at all sure that the immigration policy 
is the best for this country at this particular time. The 
country needs a great amount of unskilled labor, for there 
is still much rough work to be done and great enterprises 
have to be taken in hand requiring the work of many thou- 
sands of men who are not afraid of hard work and can face 
comparative discomfort. The immigrant is the man who 
has always done that work. After a lengthy residence in 
this country he will not take up the burden of common 
labor. He looks for something- better. That is all as it 
should be. Progression in material well being is the very 
essence of our governmental system. But we must keep 
up the numbers of those who are willing to do that work 
or our progress is thwarted at the very source. These 
British. Irish, and northern immigrants, whom we need, 
are largely skilled, and are willing to pay. But at the 
same time we must have sufficient of the commoner class 
of labor. 



The water question in San Francisco is get- 
Hot Water ting warm, it is nearly boiling, in spite of the 
sensible action of the mayor and the major- 
itv of the supervisors. It would seem as if the whole matter 
would have to go to the courts and we may witness a long 
drawn-out agony, while the water wastes and wastes and we 
are all the poorer. There is a very demoniac passion for liti- 
gation which eats into the vitals of our politics and which is 
perhaps unavoidable in the presence of those written consti- 
tutions which are our fetishes and, like all fetishes, require 
their sacrifices. , 

The experts solemnly affirm, ("assert" is all too feeble a 
word) that only the courts of last instance can deal with 
this matter. Already the couriers are en route to the na- 
tional capital, already drafts of agreement cumber the bag- 
gage of amiable assistant attorneys and equally amiable 
assistant engineers, who are perspiring in the dust of the 
transcontinental route, burdened with their copies of con- 
tracts. Already on the trail of our hot water, we see a host 
of lawyers and stenographers and clerks and judges, all 
growing fat and battening on the very simple question as 
to whether it is advisable that we should make monev in- 
stead of wasting water. We are a droll people. 

And into the fray rides the Modesto Irrigation Board, cry- 
ing out that it also is betrayed, that the sale of electricity 
which otherwise was going to waste to the Pacific Gas and 



Electric Company, is a violation of their rights and that the 
sacred banner of the Raker Act is being dragged in the dust. 
More money for Modesto attorneys, stenographers, clerks 
and judges, again, and the water power wastes and wastes! 
All of which causes us to wonder mildly if. indeed, we are 
the very clever people that we advertise ourselves to be, 
and if we are really endowed with that extraordinary 
amount of sense with which we credit ourselves. 



Those who are convinced that there 
American Rubber is a good chance for the development 
of rubber-growing in the Philippines 
appear to have a very solid grievance against the policy of 
the United States government in those islands, with re- 
spect to the land question. 

According to the statements of Mr. Daniel R. Williams 
of San Francisco, it would appear that those who would fur- 
nish the capital for the cultivation of that particular \ rod- 
uct are forbidden by the laws of the islands from hold- 
ing enough land to make the growing of rubber a profit- 
able enterprise. The amount of land which they can cul- 
tivate is limited to 2500 acres and it is generally agreed 
that land in such tracts is not useful for the growth of 
rubber, which requires larger tracts to make the invest- 
ment profitable. 

There is no doubt about the value of rubber to this coun- 
try, in particular, and there is also no question that the 
rubber supply is not in American hands at the present, but 
is in the hands of British enterprise. Concerning this, it 
must be admitted that the British have shown groat saga- 
city and enterprise in taking over the rubber industry in 
its infancy and in advancing much capital for the develop- 
ment of the cultivation of the plant at a time when there 
was no certainty that the demand would attain its present 
proportions. 

All the circumstances point to the necessity of the crea- 
tion of a supply of rubber of our own which will make us 
less dependent upon the outside. This would be to the 
interests of the Philippines as well as to the users of the 
commodity in this country. All that tends to increase the 
wealth of the islands will of necessity increase the well- 
being of the natives, besides relieving us of an incubus in 
the shape of constantly rising prices. 



The Inheritance Tax 



There is a decided movement to- 
wards the reduction, if not the 
abolition, of the inheritance tax. It 
has been discovered that this tax is a burden and greatly 
impedes industry. The secretary of the treasury, who is re- 
garded as one of the greatest financiers in the history of the 
country and perhaps the best authority in the world today 
on practical finance, is all in favor of the abolition of the fed- 
eral inheritance tax. He has, however, somewhat modified 
his program to meet the contingencies of the hour as ap- 
pears from, the report of a conference between Mr. Mellon 
and Representative Green, Chairman of the Ways and 
Mean- Committee on the tax reduction program. 

The general impression is that it would be useless to press 
Congress to abolish the inheritance taxes and leave the mat- 
ter to the several states, for it is recognized that at present 
the feeling in Congress is not for the abolition of the tax, 
but for a substantial reduction. 

Of course the trouble, again, is with our vastly differen- 
tiated states' governments. If the federal taxes were abol- 
ished, all that one would have to do to escape any inheritance 
tax at all, would be to go and live in Florida or in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. At present, the tendency of people who 
want to evade the payment of inheritance taxes is to go to 
either of the districts named and thus escape. 

The suggestion of the Chairman of the Ways and Means 
Committee is to credit the entire state inheritance tax on 
the federal tax, only twenty-five per cent being at present 



July 4, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



credited, in the case of states that agree not to tax the prop- 
erty of a non-resident decedent. 

This matter is of great importance to this state, as it will 
determine in a large degree the number of rich visitors to 
the state. Where one can visit a state with a feeling of 
security that his property will not be taxed on his decease, 
he feels much more secure than he does at present. 



There must be high revelry in 
Laughing With Apes monkey-land, if there is any way 
that the ingenious and saltatory 
progenitors of the Tennessee law can discover how impor- 
tant they have become over night, as it were. We are a 
most ridiculous sort of folk in some of our manifestations, 
and our perversity in carrying things to extremes will kill 
the universe with laughter some of these days. 

Important barristers, judges and scientists are off full 
speed to Dayton, Tenn., to prosecute and defend a high 
school teacher for teaching evolution against the law. To 
read the list of expert witnesses is to have the names of the 
most distinguished men in the field of science in the United 
States today. Our most notorious criminal lawyer and our 
most inept secretary of state are there, one on the one side, 
the other on the other, for the purpose of lending the ab- 
surdity of oratory to the bathos of the situation. The only 
chance of any good "out" of the mess is that some may 
learn a little of modern science, but the chance is remote. 
The funny page will still hold the center of interest for the 
commuter. 

The whole matter is so complicated that none but those 
whose ancestry is at least doubtful on the intellectual side 
would think of getting into it. The State of Tennessee takes 
the stand that one is not entitled to teach, in the public 
schools, doctrines of which the public does not approve. 
That looks all right till one examines the capacity of the 
public for accepting doctrines; then one has to laugh. On 
the other hand the scientists are keen on teaching as certain- 
ties what are still mere unproved assumptions; then one has 
to laugh again. If our readers will consult a recent article 
on Jacques Loeb in a current magazine and get the view.- of 
a great scientist on the subject, they will laugh again. It 
is all laughable. 



We are nut permitted, evi- 
The Chinese Movement dently, to get the full account 

of the happenings in China. 
There is more underneath which we are not allowed to 
know. Our daily papers, for example, gave us no inkling 
of the extent of the protest which has been made by the 
University of Pekin faculty, the President of which is an 
American. This body of educators, which is in turn backed 
up by the missionaries, are a unit in saying that the trouble 
was precipitated by unnecessary violence on the part of 
the foreign concession police. 

However that may he. there is reason to believe that 
our people in China require the assistance of the nation 
which they claim as home. If Americans are in danger 
in China — and it would seem as if they must lie under 
some considerable risks — there is no question that they 
must have the help of their countrymen and that the in- 
tervention by the United States, on a considerable scale, 
should be undertaken. Our position in the Pacific requires 
us not only to make a showing, but to make the best show- 
ing and to prove the imperial quality of our power. \\ e 
cannot afford to play second fiddle in a matter of that sort. 
Present danger has to lie met. It may turn out that 
there has been a mistake in handling the situation and 
that the foreign concessions police has been betrayed into 
one of those errors in the use of force which are always 
apt to occur where peoples of different races are brought 
into contact. If so. the offenders should be punished. But, 



in the meantime, we cannot afford to allow those of our 
own flesh and blood to be exposed to risks at the hands 
of a populace frenzied with anti-foreign feeling. There 
is no doubt at all about the excitement of the Chinese. One 
finds it reflected even here ; the racial feeling is running 
high. Under the circumstances there is nothing to do but 
take things in hand. 



Redwood Highway Tours 

Over the Redwood Highway to Lake County via the 
Redwood Stage is the latest travel wrinkle to attract the 
week-ender, the tourist and the vacationist, according to 
Clyde Edmondson, General Passenger Agent for the West 
Coast Transit Company. 

This is possible as the result of the purchase of the Ukiah 
Upper Lake Stage Line from W. H. Miller. 

Passengers may now board a Redwood Highway stage 
at 75 Fifth Street in the heart of San Francisco's downtown 
district — and ride straight through to Lake County resorts 
without being bothered with ferries and other changes, ac- 
cording to the new summer schedules, showing cars leaving 
San Francisco daily at 6:45 A. M. and 2:10 P. M. 

A further interest is the through service recently an- 
nounced to Portland via Eureka and Crescent City over the 
Redwood Highway. This trip may be made in three days 
on a through ticket at special rates. 

Through service is also offered to Oregon Caves, Crater 
Lake, Rainier Park, Seattle, Vancouver and other points of 
interest via Redwood Stage System. 

The scenery along this route, it is declared, is unsur- 
passed, leading through one hundred miles of giant red- 
woods and enchanting mountain, river and marine scenery. 

It is claimed that California's sportiest hunting and fish- 
ing country borders the Redwood Highway along the 
Klamath, the Pel, the Trinity' and the Smith rivers. 

The woods are full of game, deer, fowl and even bear. 
Truly, it is a hunters' and anglers' Elysian Fields — where 
one's greatest sporting dreams may be realized. 

From the time you leave San Francisco, northbound, or 
leave a northern terminus, southbound — no matter how far 
you may be journeying, your trip will he replete with thrills 
and joy. You will be thankful that you are alive to enjoy 
such marvelous scenery, which even the most fantastic 
imagination cannot conjure up. 

You will be invigorated and thoroughly refreshed from 
your trip with every scene a delightful memory, and every 
town on the road a new discovery. The Redwood Highway 
is alive with beauty — romance — forest music — Indian lore — 
and all things wild. 

When you settle back comfortably in the cushions of 
your Redwood Highway Coach — hound for anywhere this 
side of Paradise — you may rest assured that you are off for 
the most surprisingly delightful jaunt of your life. 



At Feather River Inn 

Many San Francisco society folk went up to the Feather 
River country for the holiday, a large number taking part 
in the golf tournament at Feather River Inn in which 
golfers from all parts of the state competed. Guests at the 
Inn included: Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Fennimore. Mrs. An- 
drew I. McCarthy, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Tissot. Mr. and Mrs. 
L'da Waldrop, Mrs. Walter Fisher. Mr. Mervin J. O'Neill, 
Mr. and Mrs. X. F. Galgiani. Mrs. A. Schwabacher, Mrs. 
George Ebright, Mr. and Mrs. Max Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. 
Raas, Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Allen. Mr. and Mr-. Will 
lacobs and Miss Leslie Jacobs and Mr. and Mrs. Hugo 
Rammacciotti. 



— To doubt your country is to doubt yourself. Practice 
justice, loyalty and patience. Patience is the performance 
of your duty, justice toward your fellow man, and loyalty 
to your God. your country and your flag. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 




>LEj4SURE$W1ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore* 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



Curran 

THE lon^ awaited musical success, "No, No. Nanette," 
will open at the Curran Theater on Monday evening 
next. Edward D. Smith, noted producer, is bringing here 
the splendid company of singers, players, and dancers who 
have been delighting Los Angeles audiences for eighteen 
weeks, and the same rich and beautiful production first dis- 
closed in that city. 

He is presenting this greatest of musical successes in as- 
sociation with H. H. Frazee, the original producer and 
owner of the show, who has companies operating in Europe. 
Australia and America at the present time. 

This play ran forty weeks in Chicago, and another com- 
pany is now on its way to that city to resume the run. 
This piece was originally a farce called, "My Lady Friends," 
and was turned into a musical comedy by Frank Mandcl 
and Otto Herbach. with lyrics by Irving Caesar ami catchy 
music by Vincent Youmans, and is the biggest success 
since the first days of "Pinafore." 

Heading the cast will be seen the ever popular Taylor 
Holmes, Nancy Welford. a musical star new to San Fran- 
cisco but certain to win friends here at once. Others in 
the cast are Marie Wells, Willard Hall. Angie Norton, 
Dorothy Whitmore, Gardiner Hart, Jean Nash, Pauline 
French, Mia Marvin, and a stunning chorus. 

The same scale of popular prices that obtained during the 
run of "Lady, Be Good," will continue for "No, No, 

Nanette." 

* * * 

President 

Henry Duffy has made up his mind that comedies are 
the most popular form of entertainment with the San Fran- 
cisco theater goers, and announces a fourth week of that 
rare fun show, "The Best People," at his beautiful little 
theater on McAllister Street. 

There are many laughs in this piece, which was written 
by Avery Hopwood and David Gray. There is not a lagging 
moment' in the plot, and it holds the attention till the very 
last line. 

Duffy has provided San Francisco with a company su- 
perior to that which staged the play in the east. Marion 
Lord is responsible for much of the fun in the role of the 
gold-digging chorus girl, and the leading roles are in the 
capable hands of Eveta Nudsen, Norman llackett and 
David Herblin. Others in the cast include Florence Rob- 
erts, Earl Lee, Marion Sterly, Robert Adams, Olive 
Cooper, William Macauley, John Mackenzie and Eugene 
Baranowski 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"Irene," as presented by Henry Duffy at the popular ] 
Alcazar Theater, has certainly won great favor in the eyes 
of San Franciscans, and well it might, for it brought back 
to us Dale Winter in her adorable role of Irene O'Dare. 
its great popularity has caused Henry Duffy to continue it 
for a fifth week, starting with tomorrow's performance. 

Miss Winter in the title role, is at her best. Henry Duffy 
is great as a male modiste, and Flo Irwin has a great comedy 
part as Mrs. O'Dare. There is a fine supporting cast, which 
includes Walter Regan, Henry Coote, Sidney Reynolds, 



Gladys Nagle, Dorothy LaMar, Ralph Murphy, Bernice 
Berwin, Henrv Caubisens and Walter White. 



Golden Gate 

There is a notable bill to be seen at the Golden Gate 
this week. Heading the list of star attractions will be seen 
Clara Kimball Young, internationally famous screen star, 
in a fine playlet entitled "His Adorable Wife." 

Lew Brice, popular comedian, and brother to the famous 
Fanny, will be seen in an offering entitled, "Stick to Your 
Dancing." Florence Tempest ami Homer Dickinson have 
a classy song and dance act called "Rain-Beau." As a vaude- 
ville team these two hold the spot near the top of the ladder. 
The feature on the screen will be a drama of the domestic 
troubles in the upper social set called "Everyman's Wife," 
featuring Elaine Hammerstein and Herbert Rawlinson, with 
Dorothy Phillips, Robert Cain and Diana Miller in support. 
Libonati, the jazz wizard of the xylophones, will give a 
musical recital. Closing the bill will be seen the unusual 
and extraordinary act by the Six Chinese Gladiators. 

* * * 
New Columbia 

The first presentation in this city of the biggest and most 
costly attraction ever sent on tour in the history of the 
theaters of America will occur tomorrow evening at the 
Xew Columbia when Messrs. Lee and J. J. Shubert will 
present the "Passing Show" direct from the Xew York en- 
gagement. 

Such stars as Georgie Price, Brendel and Bert, and Mar- 
garet Breen are in the cast. This show is described as one 
of the most gorgeous ami fascinating of spectacles. There 
are some 150 singers and dancers and comedians, who will 
take part in 28 colossal scenes of ( Oriental splendor. 

With them will be heard the Xew York Winter Garden 
Orchestra, and the management announces that this at- 
traction will only be seen here and in Los Angeles for a 
limited engagement. 



Loew's Warfield 

The man of the hour in motion picture drama is Milton 
Sills, who is the star in the offering at the Warfield this 
week, where he will be seen as a great big fine Irish police- 
man in "The Making of < >'Malley." This play is an adapta- 
tion of Gerald Beaumont's short story, and is said to pro- 
vide a splendid vehicle for Sills. 

Dorothy Mackaill will be seen in the role of the rich 
heiress in support of Sills. 

George Lipschultz and his Music Masters will he heard 
in some very pleasing numbers. Fanchon and Marco have 
irepared another of their attractive "Ideas," and the new 
i irgan is ni iw in use. 

The West Coast Theaters, Inc., have just recently signed 
a million dollar contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, and 
through this arrangement they will offer such attractions 
as "Merry Wives of Gotham," starring Marion Davies, and 
many other big features. 
Granada 

This week at the Granada will be seen "Raffles." Every- 
one who likes detective stories will want to see this pic- 



July 4, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



AZTEC 
Market nr. Eighth 

EGYPTIAN 

Market at Jones 



Pictures 



ALEXANDRIA I Pictures 


ALCAZAR 1 "Irene" 
O'Farrell nr. Powell J HenryDuffyPlayers 


CALIFORNIA 1 "Grounds For 
4th and Market j Divorce" 


CAMEO 1 "Taming the West" 
936 Market St. [with Hoot Gibson 


CASTRO I Pictures 


COLISEUM J Pictures 


NEW ) 

COLUMBIA r "Passing Show" 

Eddy and Mason ' 


CURRAN 1 

Geary, Nr. Mason j ' No - No - Nanette" 


GOLDEN GATE) „ , ... 
r. ,. « j -r ■ r Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. and Taylorl 


GRANADA 1 „ Raffles „ 

1066 Market St. J 


IMPERIAL I "The Ten 
1077 Market St. j Commandments" 


LOEWS 1 "The Making of 
WARFIELD \ O'Malley" 
988 Market St. > MILTON sii.i.s 


METROPOLITAN I pictures 

2055 Union St. J 


NEW FILLMORE 1 pictures 
NEW MISSION J 


ORPHEUM I Vaudeville 

O'Farrell and Powell J 


PANTAGES I Vaudeville 
Market at Mason 


PRESIDENT | "The Best People" 


STRAND I pictures 
965 Market St. 


UNION 1 Pictures 
SQUARE J anc i Vaudeville 


WILKES 1 

iKomtrijBwtr) > "White Cargo" 
Geary and Mason 


u-TfM»7AM I Pictures 
WIGWAM f Willis West Revue 



ture. There is also another of the pop- 
ular Harry Langdon comedies. The 
musical prologue will be "School 
Days." 

* * * 

Civic Auditorium 

Eight hundred trained voices will be 
heard in the greatest chorus ever as- 
sembled in this city, at the Civic Audi- 
torium, on August 15 and 16, at the 
Pacific Sangerfest, the first celebration 
of its kind to be held on the Coast in 
fifteen years. 

To accommodate this body of sing- 
ers, a special stage is being built, 130 
feet wide and 41 feet deep. Five hun- 
dred voices constitute the male chorus, 
composed of the Pacific Sangerbund 
singers, augmented by two societies of 
Swiss singers, and similar male chor- 
uses from all the leading cities of Cali- 
fornia, Oregon and Washington. Three 
choruses will come up from Los An- 
geles, aggregating some 150 voices. 

Four Metropolitan opera stars have 
been engaged, there will be a sym- 
phony orchestra participating. There 
will be two evening performances, and 
one afternoon. Trophies will be given 
in three classes, according to Sanger- 
fest traditions. 

Mayor James Rolph. Jr., has ac-i 
cepted the honorary presidency of the 
event, and many prominent men both 
of ( lakland and San Francisco have 
pledged their enthusiastic support. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

There is a notable bill at the < >r- 
pheuiii this week. Heading it will be 
seen Isham Jones and his famous 
Brunswick Recording Orchestra ami 
that musical comedy favorite, Jane 
Green, whose grace and charm delight- 
ed everyone last year. 

A most interesting announcement 
comes from the Orpheum Theater in 
the wa\ oi" booking the original lul- 
laby boys from the radio station in 
Chicago, WLS, Ford and Glenn. These 
popular stars of the air will offer a 
rapid repertoire of comedy and songs, 
which has made them outstanding 
radio favorites. 

Joe Bonoma, the famous "stunt" 
man from Universal City, will also 
a. 1.1 greatly to the success of the pro- 
gram with his own original brand of 
entertainment. 

Henry Carroll and bis new rex lie, 
which is making such a hit wherever 
it appears, will be seen for the second 
week, with an entirely new line. Bert 
and Betty Wheeler, who come direct 
from the Ziegfeld Follies, will also re- 
main over for the second week. 



Cameo 

There is another of those "blue 
streak" Western stories to lie seen at 
the Cameo this week. This one is en- 
titled. "Taming the West," and fea- 



tures Hoot Gibson. In addition there 
will be another fine attraction on the 
program, a musical act, "The Battle- 
ship Cadets." 

* * * 

Wilkes 

Despite the fact that there are ruc- 
tions back stage among the cast of 
"White Cargo," and it is rumored that 
Edith Ransom will be replaced in the 
part of the half breed, crowds continue 
to throng to see this soul gripping life- 
in-the-raw drama. It is to be sin- 
cerely hoped that nothing will happen 
that will shorten the run of this won- 
derful play here. 

There is a fine group of men por- 
traying the other roles in the cast, 
headed by Richard Tucker as the em ■ 
bittered, cynical man ; Rex Cherryman 
as the blithe youth ; Dawson as the 
drink-soaked doctor, and Barney Gil- 
more as the skipper. 

* * # 
Imperial 

Crowds are the order of the day at 
the Imperial, where that stupendous 
moving picture, "The Ten Command- 
ments," is now showing. 

There is a notable cast headed by 
Theodore Roberts, who plays the part 
of Moses. Others are James Neale, 
Estelle Taylor, Richard Dix, Nita 
Xaldi. Robert Edeson, and many other 
screen notables. 

* * * 

The Night-Sky in July 

The Astronomical Society of the Pa- 
cific announces the first illustrated pop- 
ular lecture of its 1925-6 series, to lie 
given on Monday evening, July 13, at 
X p. m.. at the auditorium of the Pacific 
Gas & Electric Company, 245 Market 
street (ground floor), in San Francisco. 
The subject will be "The Night-Sky in 
Inly." to be presented by Dr. W. F. 
Meyer, associate professor of astro- 
physics in the University of California. 

There are a number of interesting 
and striking objects to be seen in the 
evening sky at this season of the year, 
and Dr. Meyer, who has been appre- 
ciatively heard by many lav audiences, 
will tell of these objects in popular lan- 
guage for the benefit of those who are 
not versed in astronomical matters. 
Jupiter and Saturn, the largest of our 
planets, and Airfares, the largest of the 
"fixed" stars, as well a> other notable 
stars, are now well-placed for naked- 
eye observation. Admission to the lec- 
ture i> free and the public is cordially 
invited. 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the Edge of the Berkeley Hills 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 





ocierry 




By Antoinette Arnold 



The Los Gatos Pageant 

WERE you in Los Gatos this past week? 
If you were, you certainly went to see the pageant, 
"La Favorita de Los Gatos." Everyone who saw this 
pageant would not have missed it for a great deal. Those 
who were not so fortunate, wish that another week would 
be given of that colorful and majestic production. 

Pageants in Los Gatos long ago established a criterion 
for supremacy and this year's production transcended them 
all. That is what many of us think ; or, is it because we 
just think that the last one is "the best?" 

When the first act began, the mind naturally picked up 
the threads of the preceding pageant, for this year's story 
began just where it had left off last year — with the wedding. 

Dramatic, effervescent with youthful fervor, bubbling 
over with the glory of picturesque scenes and radiant col- 
orings, "La Favorita de Los Gatos" immediately made 
claim upon one's interest and stirred the emotions with 
keen desire and anticipation It held the interest from the 
very firs.t line and catered to the intellect with its genuine 
story, its glorified innuendoes and its adherence to historical 
facts. 

When the lights shed their effulgence upon hundreds of 
players arrayed in brilliant shades of Spanish traditions, 
the audience broke into exclamations of admiration and joy. 

We knew at once that here was to be a pageant sufficient 
to stir the soul of one. The first impression was satisfying 
and that satisfaction leaped to heights before the fascinating 
affair came to an end. 

Notables in Cast 

California's colony of famous authors was notably repre- 
sented in the cast of players. In addition to Wilbur Hall, 
author of the pageant and the producer of "La Favorita 
de Los Gatos" as he was last year, there were many names 
to add luster to the production. 

Kathleen Norris essayed the role of "Antonia," the 
nurse, and although her speaking part was brief she gave 
liberally of her time and energy, as she ever does, to the 
success of the pageant. Charles Norris played the part of 
Don Rafael Hernandez, friend of Bandini, hero of the 
pageant-play. 

Ruth Comfort Mitchell, known in private life as Mrs. 
Sanborn Young, wife of United States Senator Young, lent 
her invaluable aid and support to the production, as she 
has every year, and appeared as one of the cast. 
Author of Pageant * * * 

Wilbur Hall, author and producer of this year's pageant, 
seems to have the faculty of being everywhere at once. 
His mental caliber, his high appreciation of art, his vision 
of things and his strict adherence to historical sequences 
dominated the production with its unusual attainments as 
a piece of creative work. 

The splendid product of a brilliant mind, excellently por- 
trayed, carefully and skillfully played — that seems to be 
the universal verdict of the Los Gatos pageant which it 
was the privilege of Californians and their guests to see. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Hush Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



The pageant-play this year, "La Favorita de Los Gatos," 
took up the story where "El Gato de Los Gatos" left it a 
year ago. The scene is mostly the same, the hacienda of 
Don Caspar de Bandini on El Rancho del Rinconada de 
Los Gatos, near the present site of the town of Los Gatos, 
and within a few miles of the stage on which the pageant 
was played. A picturesque old chapel, with its chimes, 
supplanted last year's adobe house; otherwise the scenes 
were similar. 

Through the four acts, the gay old days of Spanish Cali- 
fornia lived anew its scenes of music, fiestas and street 
gatherings, awakening soft echoes of the past with voices, 
mandolins, guitars and merry dances. 

Lyrics for the pageant-play were especially written for 
the occasion by Ruth Comfort Mitchell. Songs sung dur- 
ing the play were taken from a collection of early California 
songs by Charles F. Lummis. They were arranged by 
Arthur Farwell. 

Young men from the Los Gatos high school played 
the orchestrations during the production and during short 
and snappy intermissions. Charles Hayward directed the 
orchestra. 

Harry Pearce was the stage manager and was publicly 
paid a tribute at the suggestion of the producer. Wilbur 
Hall. The business manager was Neal McGrady; Dudley 
Williams, director of art; Earl Towner, director of the 
chorus; Roy Davenport, director of illumination, and Harry 
George was the director Los Guitarreros. 

A distinct plot threaded its way through the production. 
The pleasure loving and happy peoples of Alta California 
assailed by the Mexican Governor and his men. their at- 
tempt at usurpation and the uprising of the Spanish colony 
kept the interest keen and alert. Soldiers, peons, priests, 
Indians and the contending commanders added zest to the 
scenes bringing dramatic force into the mighty theme. 

Spanish music, Spanish dances, the twang of the guitar, 
punctuated the plot with colorful flavor and fascination. 
In fact the flamboyant spectacle and its message of a strug- 
gling people added a glamour and a charm which pro- 
nounced anew the value of pageantry for which this state 
is famed. 

* * * 

Presentation at Court 

Society throughout the entire Bay region, and. in fact, 
throughout the entire West, is deeply interested in the an- 
nouncement of the presentation at court of .Miss Louise 
A. Boyd. 

Popular in the smart set and particularly prominent in 
the society realm of California, Washington and New York, 
a host of ardent friends followed with intense acclaim the 
first news that brought word of Louise Boyd's formal pres- 
entation in Buckingham Palace. 

The presentation ceremony at the court of their majesties, 
King George and Queen Mary, was one of the most brilliant 
events even of such magnificent affairs, which lias ever 
been chronicled, according to cablegrams and correspon- 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



I 



July 4, 1925 



SAN FRANCISO I NEWS LETTER 



dent descriptions from the London capital. 
Radiantly attired American women, present 
when Miss Boyd made her courtly bow to 
the royal majesties, accompanied the lovely 
California heiress in what has been rightly 
termed one of the most fascinating and elegant 
presentations in years. 

* # * 

Exquisitely Gowned <■ 

The elegant gown worn by Miss Boyd has 
been described as befitting her charms and 
loveliness. Silver tissue elegantly embroid- 
red with pearls and sparkling stones was used 
as the texture of her gown. A court train of 
blue velvet lined with blue tissue and edged 
with the rarest of chinchilla fell in graceful 
folds from the gown and she carried the con- 
ventional feather fan required by all who are 
presented at the British court. 

Stanford Chapel Scene 

of Two Weddings Recently 

Three weddings of society interest have 
taken place just recently in the chapel at the 
Leland Stanford Junior University. On Thursday, June 
25, the wedding of Miss Margaret Watson, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Watson, and Mr. Herbert Hoover, 
Jr., son of Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover and 
Mrs. Hoover, was held at Stanford Memorial Church. It 
was a quiet affair, attended by relatives and a few close 
friends, and Dr. Charles Gardner officiated at the ceremony, 

The bride, who was unattended, wore a lovelj gown of 
white Georgette crepe, made on extremely simple lines. 
With it she wore a white tulle picture hat, and a corsage 
of lilies of the valley. 

Mr. Allen Hoover was his brother's best man. 

Following the wedding a reception was held 
Hoover home in Palo Alto. The bridal collide wil 
to the eastern coast on their wedding trip and wi 
their home for the next few years in Cambridge 

* * * 
Lee-Hills Wedding 

Another important wedding at the same church was held 
on Saturday, June 20. when Miss Ethel l.ee. daughter 
of Mr and Mrs John Lee of Palo Alto, became the bride 
of Mr. William Leslie Hills, son of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
Mills of San Francisco. Mr. Charles Gardner officiated 

at the ceremony, which was held at half past eight '•'clock- 
in the presence of a large number of relatives and friends. 
The bride was given in marriage by her father. She 
wore an attractive gown of white Georgette crepe, fashioned 

on extremely simple lines and made with a full skirt. Her 

tulle bridal veil fell from a headdress of handsome lace. 

Mrs. Mil ward Hunkin was her sister's matron of honor. 

She wore a gown of ecru lace, made over pink satin, and 

carried a sheaf of yellow calla lilies. 

* * * 

The wedding of Miss Louise Hoover, daughter of Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. T. J, Hoover of Stanford University, and 
niece o) Secretary of Commerce Hoover, to Mr. Ernest 
Albert Dunbar, also took place at the Stanford Memorial 
Church. 

The ceremony was held last Sunday afternoon with a 
group of intimate friends and relatives in attendance. Dr. 
Gardner read the marriage service. 

The bride is a recent graduate of Miss Head's school 




II (II 101. < l\Ti:itlll 111 
"JiO Sultrr Slreel 

Han I'Yancisco's Kinesi 
Family Hotel 
2 50 kooms 
ites: Prom $2.50 per day 



at the 

motor 

I make 

Ma -. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, Cahfornia 

On tha Coatt Highway Hall*ra* Bftwrfn San Francnc* and Lea Angclaa 
An Inn of Lnutual Exrellaoca. 



in Berkeley. Her husband is a graduate of 
the University of California and a member 
of the Chi I'si fraternity. 

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett D. 
John Dunbar of Alameda. 



Mr. James D. Phelan was host at a luncheon 
on Sunday, when he entertained a group of 
his friends at his country home. Villa Mont- 
alvo. Following the luncheon a song recital 
was given by Mme. Povla Frijsh, accompanied 
at the piano by Miss Elizabeth Alexander. 
Mme. Frijsh, who has a charming voice, en- 
tertained the guests with a group of German, 
French and English songs. 

The guests included Mr. and Mrs. William 
Denman, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ashfield Stow, Mir. and Mrs. 
John Bakewell, Mr. and Mrs. O. K. Cushing, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bulotti, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Alexander, Miss Ethel Cooper, Miss Jane 
Cooper, Mrs. Oscar Cooper, Mr. and Mrs. 
Timothy Healy, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. 
Driscoll, Mrs. Lemmon, the Misses Lemmon, Mr. and Mrs. 
A. Pedrini, Commander and Mrs. Joseph Leroy Nielson, 
Miss Van Ness. Miss Janetta Whitman and Mrs. Mount- 
ford S. Wilson. Mrs. Robert' Hayes Smith, Mr. and Mrs. 
Chauncey Olcott, Mr. and Mrs. Fremont Older, Miss Mary 
Louise Phelan, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Wores, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Ryan, Mrs. K. MacRae. Miss Mollie Merrick, 
Mrs. Alexander Garceau, Mine. Povla Frijsh, Miss Alice 
Hager, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Fay, Mr. fefferson Davis, 
Mr. Harry Robertson, Mr. Noel Sullivan, Mr. Walter's. 
Martin. Mr. Philip Paschel, Mr. M. G. Huidobro and Dr. 
Harry Tevis. 

* * * 

Mrs. Evelyn Sresovich Ware was hostess at a tea at 
the St. Francis Motel, on Monday, in compliment to her 
sister. Miss Clarisse Sresovich, whose engagement to Mr. 
Richard Ahrens was recently announced. The guests 
were Mrs. I ; .. K. Carreras, Jr., Mrs. Geo. Knorp, Mrs. C. 
McCarthy, Mrs. J. Forbes, Mrs. A. 1.. Moreggia, Mrs. 
V. Moreggia, Miss Mignon Harmon, Mrs. A. S. Musante, 
Mrs. \y. EC. Harnden, Mrs. B. E. Dehn, Mrs. R. T. Jensen, 
Mrs. |. X. Sresovich, Miss F. Marinovich, Mrs. W'm. Hogan 
of Brockton, Mass. 

* * * 

Society Folk Who Were 
Visitors at Santa Barbara 

Society people from the Rurlingame and San Fraivisco 
smart sets were visiting in Santa Barbara during the 
recent quake, but according to authentic reports were un- 
harmed by the temblor. 

Santa Barbara has for many seasons been the favorite 
social resort and this year's contingency visiting the pretty 
southern city numbered even larger than in other years. 
That they all escaped unharmed is a cause for genuine 
rejoicing 

Among those in Santa Barbara were Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Gay Hooker, Jr., (Marianne Kuhn) whose wedding 
in Burlingame a fortnight ago was one of the society events 
of the peninsula set. Mr. and Mrs. Hooker went to Santa 
Barbara on the evening of their nuptials. 

Other society leaders who were in Santa Barbara at the 

ntlnued on page 13.) 



I AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 



Wirt mr icrua for raaarraMN 



■ n«xs trip aeatlA 



It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see PeckJudah. 



1G 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 



-ewtys* 



-^96^ 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



~®S<ft" 



««a^ 




I 



"NVITATIONAL gold tournaments have 
become one of the most popular forms uf 
out-door sports among the bay and peninsula 
sets. The men of Burlingame and the Beres- 
ford Golf and Country clubs each held a very 
interesting and representative invitational 
event which attracted all the foremost stars, 
and some remarkable golf was played during 
the progress of the tournaments. Mrs. Louis Lengfekl. 
captain of the women at the Beresford Golf and Country 
Club, not to be outdone by the men, sent out invitations 
to all the club members of the Northern California Golf 
Association to participate in an invitational handicap sweep- 
stake golf tournament at her home club. 

Mrs. Lengfekl had two objects in view: first of all, 
it was the first tournament of its kind to have ever been 
held at this popular peninsula club ; and secondly, it would 
give her guests a chance to play over the Beresford's new 
course, which has only been open quite recently, and which 
is considered by critics to be one of the most scientifically 
laid out golf courses in the state. 

This work of art was designed by Donald Ross, the 
world-renowned golf architect. 

It was superintended and built by Ed Lyden. the genial 
manager of the Beresford Country Club. 

Louis Welch, president of the Northern California Golf 
Association, claims that in the course of a couple of years 
the Beresford links will be the finest in the state, and 
Louis ought to know, for he belongs to more clubs than 
anyone in San Francisco, and has played over every im- 
portant golf course in Europe. 

Mrs. Lengfekl felt proud when President Walter Set- 
theimer extended her the privilege to invite her friends 
to join in a get-together tournament, which attracted one 
hundred and fifty women golfers, who played an 18-hole 
medal play at handicaps. 

Mrs. Herbert Schmidt of the Presidio Golf Club and 
Mrs. Louis Lengfold forfeited their chance to plav in the 
tournament in order to check up on the scores and show 
their guests a good time. 

Mrs. Frank Sheedy. the citv champion, won the premium 
honors of the da}-, being the only player to break the 
century mark. 

Mrs. Alfred Meyer of the host club was low net winner 
in the A class. Mrs. Theodore Rethers, Jr., of the Presidio 
club and one of the most improved women players in this 
section, was second ; Miss Dorothy Jordon, also of Presidio, 
came third, while Mrs. Ira S. Anderson of San Jose was 
fourth. 

Mrs. M. Hirschman of the Beresford club carried off the 
best gross cup in the B class; Mrs. Silas Sinton, also of 
Beresford, was first low net winner; Miss Kathrene Hib- 
bard second and Mrs. Louis Pfau and Mrs. Oliver Dibble 
of the Presidio club were third and fourth, respectively. 
Mrs. McKinley Bissenger, another Beresford player, cap- 
tured first place in C class, winning her first cup in tour- 
nament play. Miss Geneve Fisher of the Lake Merced 
Gold Club, followed the example set by Mrs. Bissinger by 
winning first low net, and also winning her first trophy iii 
competition. Miss Fisher has shown considerable improve- 
ment in her game of late and the women at Lake Merced 
are hopeful of her becoming a real star some day, as she 
has beautiful poise and plays a very sweet game of golf. 
Mrs. Allen Hibbard was second and Mrs. Louise Bauml 
third. 



Menlo Cup Tourney 

The Menlo cup tournament just concluded, although an 
invitational affair, is the only tournament in this section 
of the state that extends over the week. This particular 
annual event is always looked upon as one of the big events 
of the year and always brings out the best women golfers, 
who delight to play the Menlo course and enjoy the hos- 
pitality that abounds in the clubhouse. 

Mrs. Cleveland Forbes, captain of the woman's annex 
at Menlo, proved a worthy host from Monday, when the 
qualifying round was played, until Friday, the day of the 
finals. 

Mrs. Brent Potter, the San Jose champion, was the 
medalist with a card of 88, closely followed by Mrs. Max 
Rothchild 89, and Mrs. Emil Sutro 91. 

Even though the thermometer registered from 106 to 110 
during each day's play, some remarkable golf was played 
with surprises galore. 

Mrs. J. L. Mesple of Lake Merced won a remarkable 
match from Mrs. Cleveland Forbes, captain of Menlo. on 
the home green. The second day's play saw Mrs. Phil 
Wand, Lakeside's first champion, eliminate Mrs. Louis 
Lengfekl, the captain from Beresford. in a match that 
would have done credit to Glenna Collett, herself But it 
was Mrs. Emil Sutro who sprang the biggest surprise of 
the tournament when she took the measure of Mrs. Brent 

(Continued on page 16. ) 




American Plan 

Where the cordiality of welcome is followed 
by efforts of every employe to obligingly meet 
all requirements for the comfort and happi- 
ness of guests. Summer Rates in effect. 

A HOMELIKE ATMOSPHERE 

With entertainment of a high character pro- 
vided within the hotel; an almost unlimited 
variety of recreation also available on land 
bay or ocean. 

Golf On All Grass Courses 

Swimming, Aquaplaninc, Boatinc, Fishinc 

Dancing Except Sunday Nights 

EARL FEGAN'S CASINO ORCHESTRA 

San Francisco Acent: W. H. Ramace 

Oceanic Bldg., 2 Pine Street 

Mel S. Wricht, Manac.kr 
CORONADO BEACH, CALIFORNIA 



July 4, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



♦ 


THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 

By Josephine Wilson 


1 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




.IOSEPHIMT. 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 
Lieutenant William B. Sweeley, the avi- 
ator who flew across the continent in the 
dawn-to-dusk race against time, expects to 
break the record he made in flying 1600 
miles in the total eclipsed time of 15 hours 
and 29 minutes. 

"I cannot speak too highly of the air 
mail," declared Lieutenant Sweeley, in talk- 
ing of the flight. "Without their assistance 
my attempt would have been a dismal failure." 

Sweelev said that two men, mechanics at the Concord 
Field, from whence he started on his famous race with 
the sun, were on duty at 2 o'clock in the morning to get 
his machine ready for the test. At Reno, on the return 
trip, air mechanics pumped up a tire on the landing gear, 
filled the plane with eas and oil and water and had Lieu- 
tenant Sweeley in the air again in exactly five minutes. 

The time spent on the ground during the live landings 
made on his epochal flight across the continent was one 
hour and six minutes. Lieutenant Sweeley made correc- 
tions in the time given out last Saturday night. The total 
elapsed time, he said, was exactly 15 hour- and 29 
minutes; the total thing time being 14 hours and 23 min- 
utes. A heavy sandstorm, a cloudburst ami extremely 
high winds were referred to as "mere incidents." A pocket 
thermometer which he carried registered 120 degrees short- 
ly after he entered the state of Nevada, 

* * * 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce has for its 
recruits a number of voting boys from the juvenile organiza- 
tions in it> campaign of forest tin- prevention. Represen- 
tatives from ten organizations made up of children attended 
the meeting last Saturday and pledge. 1 their support of the 
drastic movement against the deadly forest fires in various 
pari- of this portion of the State. 

The children promised to aid in the distribution of pledge 
cards for the forest lire prevention. They also pledged their 

united efforts in urging friend- to observe the pledge: 
"T( do everything in my power to keep lire- out of our 
great wealth of forests and watershed-; to save the grow- 
ing forests for growing children'" 

Member.- of the organizations will compete for prize- to 

be awarded to those bringing in the largest number of sub- 
scriptions as well .i- for the prize- in the form ot b.i 
to be awarded the organization-. 

These organizations were the Boj Scouts of America. 
Telegraph ilill Neighborh 1 Association, Visitacion Val- 
ley Community Center, Jewish Community Center. Y. M. 
C, \. Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, Girl Reserves. 
Y, \\ . C. V. Booker T. Washington Communit) Service 
and the Community Service Recreation League. 

* * * 

Elbert 11. Gary, head of the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion, led a group of friends in a tramp over his large estate 
at lerico. Long Island, and had them all puffing at the finish. 

All of those in the party were many year> younger than 
Gary, but he -et the pace and at the end was the lean 
fatigued. 

Interviewed at the end of the hike. Cary gave all the 
credit for hi- present Superb physical condition to moderate 
living and hard work. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

Mrs. W. B. Hamilton presided at the luncheon held last 
Friday at the Canterbury Hotel when the California Re- 
publican Women's Federation, northern division, met in 
assembly. Mrs. Hamilton is first vice-president and pre- 
sided in place of Mrs. Parker Maddux, the president, who 
has gone to Honolulu in the interests of the organization. 

E. L. Hayes addressed the meeting held at the Canter- 
bury, directing his remarks to the activities of the judicial, 
the executive and the legislative departments of the gov- 
ernment. The speaker stressed the need of better team- 
work between the executive department and congress. 
Haves stated that one of the greatest hopes of America 
was its womanhood. 

It is the plan of the federation to hold sessions during the 
summer months with prominent speakers as their guests 
and topics of prime importance the meat of discussions 
and concourse. 

Mrs. George A. Rigg. organizer of the northern division, 
gave her report of the Los Angeles activities and outlined 
the meeting when Mrs. O. P. Clark, national committee- 
woman, presided. 

Mrs. Dorothy Lenroot Black, director for the northern 
division, will have charge of the sessions to be held in San 
Francisco early in the fall, when delegates will come to 
the meetings from the entire Baj region and all northern 

points of California. 

* * * 

Mrs. b'sepb Frederick I'.romlield. literary chairman of 
the San Francisco Branch, League of American Pen 
Women, gave a literary tea at her home on Taylor street 
recently in compliment to Mr-. K. S. Bamberger, wife of 
Major Bamberger, and an author of nation-wide fame. 
Mrs. Bamberger came to San Francisco a few weeks ago 
from her home in Washington. 11. C. She is now engaged 
in writing another novel upon contract ami is deeply en- 
grossed in producing a number of -tories which she must 
complete within a given time in order to satisfy her pub- 
lishers. 

Mrs. Bamberger i- a charming as well as a brilliant 
woman, whose literary work has a recognized place among 
the women of the national capital, where she was identified 
with the National League of American Pen Women. 
Major and Mr-. Bamberger are now located in the official 
residence quarters at the Presidio. 

* * * 

Or Mariana Bcrtola. president of the California Federa- 
i Women'- Clubs, has taken hold of her extensive 
executive work with the skill and mastery for which sue 
i- famed. 

"The California Federation will adhere closely to the 
policy ot the General Federation." stated Dr. Bertola in 
defining the several divisions of activities and the immense 
portion of work allotted to the federation. 

In line with this announcement. Dr. Bertola is organizing 
the state body along the identical lines as the general fed- 
erations There will be department chairmen and the de- 
partments will be subdivided into divisions, each with its 
chairman. Only a portion of the appointments to these 
suboffices have been made, but so far the list comprises 
women from many part- of the state. 

Department of American citizenship. Mrs. Claude Leach, 

- 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 



Blanco's 

By Eleanoee F. Ross 



WHERE TO DINE 



There is a Scandinavian saying to the effect that "he who 
sits longest at the table lives the longest." One of the 
essentials, it would seem to me, for a lengthy sojourn at 
table, would be comfortable chairs. And they have com- 
fortable chairs at Blanco's ! 

The back fits into your spine caressingly, the arms are 
just in the right place upon which to rest your elbows, the 
seat curves just where it should curve. One seats oneself, 
and is filled with the desire to linger. 

And the food heightens this desire. It is served with a 
sort of old-time elegance, not usually found in these 
hustling, bustling days ; every dish is placed before you as 
if, in itself, it constituted an epicurean ceremony; all its 
complements are perfect and complete, and you are given 
time to thoroughly enjoy it ; another unique characteristic, 
for we are literally rushed through our meals in most res- 
taurants as if we only had a limited time in which to dine. 
You lean back in your chair between courses, and let 
your vision delight in the surroundings, which are rest- 
ful and artistic. 

Ancient looking tapestries adorn the walls ; these fabrics 
have an air that only the mellowing effect of time can bring, 
and yet we learn to our astonishment that they were cre- 
ated in a studio at Carmel-by-the-Sea ! The soft pastel 
colorings in the Venetian chandeliers are enhanced charm- 
ingly when illuminated, and are the only ones of their kind 
in the city ; immense French paneled mirrors are placed 
about the main dining room, and reflect the myriads of 
lights in a mystic and fairy-like manner; the gallery is par- 
titioned off into numerous roomy booths, wnere parties 
can dine or lunch in privacy, while having a commanding 
view of the immense dining salon below. 

The head waiter, a courteous gentleman "to the manner 
born," showed me the ladies' reception room upstairs, done 
in Louis XV period furnishings, the cosy smoking room 
for the men on the first floor, the spacious bar where all 
sorts of enticing drinks used to be served, and where a 
wonderful loganberry cocktail was mixed for me; a visit 
into the huge kitchen, with its various compartments, its 
immense coal stove (I was informed that all the meals were 
cooked on coals ; that they believed a better flavor was ob- 
tained with this sort of fuel), ended my pleasant evening, 
and I left filled with the satisfactory glow within that only 
a fine meal, well and courteously served, imbues one with. 



"I tell you I'll speak to the management. I insist on 
having a room with a bed in it." 

"This isn't your room. This is the elevator." 

— Princeton Tiger. 

* * * 

Young man (entertaining little Mary) — Now, I'll tell 
you my pet joke. 

Little Mary — Maybe you'd better not. Mother says that 
kind isn't nice. — Washington Dirge. 

* * * 

"How did you make out when that roadhouse was 
raided?" 

"Through the rear door." — Cornell Widow. 




Uncle Tom's Cabin 
14-Mile House 



RESTAURANT 

open 8:00 a. m. to 11:00 p. m. 

unsurpassed cuisine 

Carl Leonhardt 

formerly of 
Golden Gate Park Casino 



CAFE MARQUARD 



Adjoining 1 Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters. Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 



Nightly 

Jack Holland and Miss Jean Barry 

in 

REVUE 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 7 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




ICE CREAf% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 

£ CALIFORNIA SIS LUNCHEON 

Cr.y.lon. DINNER 

| 3100 3101 31112 |»'"r<CrT 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



ani 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 



tyCeanorS 



445 Powell St., 

San Francisco 



A quiet, homelike place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchant's lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Trlvate din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 

441 Pine Street Phone Kearny 468 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Li.rkln Streets Phone Frnnklln 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 

In the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon Olt30 to 2 p. m.) .... tr„ 

Dinner. Week Dn T « ----... ., m 

Dinner. Sundays and Holiday. ..... fi^ri 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

US Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

6:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holldavs 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

Hnlf Block from Highway 






July 4, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETT 



13 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 9.) 

time of the shake were Mrs. Olivia Pillslmry de Ropp, 
who went south for the summer, having engaged the Tallan. 
house for the season. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Filer and 
their debutante daughter, Miss Lawton Filer, were also 
in Santa Barbara. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Monteagle had motored south a 
day or two preceding the disaster. Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Bentley were at Rancho San Ysidro, where Mrs. Howard 
Park of Burlingame went to spend the summer. The 
Park family had just held a family reunion at their Santa 
Barbara home, Dr. C. C. Park having greeted his family 
of thirty children and grandchildren for the lovely reunion 
of relatives. Mrs. William Frew of Pittsburgh journeyed 
to California for this event. Other members of the family 
from different parts of the state gathered at the Park 
home to extend her a hearty welcome. Mrs. Harry Gray, 
her daughter, and grandchildren were also of the party. 

Other well known society people in Santa Barbara last 
week included Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Tevis and Mrs. 
Lawrence Fox, prominent in Junior League affairs; Mr. 
and Mrs. Talbot Walker, Mrs". Harry Bothin, Mrs. Har- 
riette P. Miller and Captain W. H. McKittrick. Anxiety 
for these well known Californians was felt by all who 
knew of their sojourn in the glorious city of the south- 
land, which is so bravely meeting its disaster. 

Mr. Gordon Mackintosh and Mr. Peter Folger went 
south to attend the Bartlett-Davy wedding. Henry 
Eicheim, the composer, who lives at Montecito, a fashion- 
able Santa Barbara suburb, was one of the fortunate ones 
escaping any injury. Eicheim composed the "Oriental 
Suite" which was played by the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra last season. 

The splendid manner in which the society people opened 
•their purses and their homes to meet the emergencies is 
typical of the way Californians act under the stress of 
trouble or affliction. Doors were thrown ajar to those who 
needed assistance and immediate help was extended any 
one and everyone who found themselves oppressed. The 
same spirit of helpfulness which characterized the citizens 
of this commonwealth in the days of '06 permeated every 
nook and corner of the city of the southland — and 'made 
manifest the humanness of folks. 



Bankers and their wives t" the number of 200 gathered 
in Los Gatos, Monday for the division meeting of group 3 
of the Calif" irnia 1 tankers' Ass< iciation, embracing Monterey. 
San Benito, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz coun- 
ties. C. I''. Jordan of Palo VltO, president of the group, pre- 
sided over the business session. 



Traveler in Europe 

Mrs, Eugene Laird Bopp, who left San Francisco sev- 
eral months ago '>n a world tour, is now in Paris where 
she intends remaining for several weeks. Mrs. Bopp was 
formerly Miss Hermina Orena, one of the attractive daugh- 
ters of Mr. and Mrs. Dario Orena. Her sisters are Mrs. 
T. Wilson Dibblee. Mrs. James A. Guilfoil and Mrs. Ftank 
Casey. Mrs. Bopp plans to travel for a year. 



Mrs. Arthur L. Flood, who has devoted her time and 
energy as well as her skillful knowledge to Americanization 
work, is a newly appointed member of the State Federation 
work and will carry into the larger fields of the California 
Federation of Women's Chilis, her excellent plans for 
Americanization in which -he has majored in both collegi- 
ate and club work. Mrs. Flood's enthusiasm in subjects 
which engage her attention is a mark of definite activity. 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think (hat a vigorous l.ruxhlnc once or twice a day In 
taking very good care of them. Brushing In only n part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles thn* vrlll destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? CaU In today 
nnd talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves nnd pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfleld 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self (leaning Brldees; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 




A WARNING! 

Eye strain, headache, difiaiiuess, nausea, nervousness, cat- 
aract, double vision, Boating -|ini-, uoor memory, astig- 
matism, cross eyes, styes, clinch arming or watery eyes, 
iwoolon or crusty eyelids, itchy or inflamed eyes, farsight— 
and nearsightedness, or if one eye is weaker than ihe other 
— these symptoms should reeeive immediate care and atten- 
tion. We advise that you consult 

George Mayerle. Optometrist 

' Optical Practice 960 Market Street. San Francisco 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc.. of .London 

Commissions In London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

tf'PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



DR 

Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell 

San Francisco 



B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 

Hours 9 tv. 4 
Telephone Douglas 2949 



Parisian 

Sail* Preiird 

SW Post Stbeet 

Is YntciMA Hotel 


Dyeing and 

Bv Hand Only— Suiti Called For 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyting and Cleartin? 


Cleaning 

and Delivered 

Sam Fiamchco 
Pkoxk FmxKLii 2510 
■ ■ 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes. Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LFTTER 



July 4, 1925 



Finance 



SURETY companies have been hard hit lately by deposi- 
tory bond losses. This has been felt particularly in New 
York, where after this trouble the failure of the Carnegie 
Trust at Carnegie, Penn., again put the line "in the red." 

* * * 

— Thomas J. Craig, agency superintendent for the Insur- 
ance Company of North America, Yorkshire and Northern 
of New York has been appointed Pacific Coast manager. Mr. 
Craig has had a brilliant career in this field and much is 

expected from his executive ability. 

* * *" 

— While the Atlas and the Albany will henceforth be 
operated on independent lines, says Manager Devlin, there 
will be no rate cutting, unless the companies represented by 
him are attacked by others, or there is any concerted action 
against them. The Atlas and the Albany will continue tc be 
served in the same manner as heretofore, which has made 
the Atlas a factor in the insurance business on the Pacific 
Coast for the past thirty-nine years. 

— All over the country there is an outcry against the taxa- 
tion which is becoming a burden on the community. It is 
true that there is too much taxation ; it is true, also, that 
there is perhaps too great a desire for the showy side of 
life as represented by too expensive schoolhouses and too 
elaborate roads. On the other hand, fine schoolhouses and 
good roads are in the long run economical and nothing less 
is of advantage to a proud and prosperous people. 

— The demand for first-class bonds is constant. The argu- 
ments that in the long run stocks are better than bonds do 
not seem to appeal. * * * 

— Paul Shoup, executive vice-president of the Southern 
Pacific Company, in his address before the National Electric 
Light Association Convention at San Francisco, made the 
following very illuminating points affecting freight charges : 
"If we cut the freight rates and fares of the United States 
uniformly 10 per cent, then looking upon the railroads of 
the country as a whole, their ability to pay either interest 
or dividends would disappear. How insignificant this 10 
per cent of the freight charge is compared with the cost to 
the consumers of the articles they use can be readily seen by 
taking 10 per cent of the charges that I have quoted. Yet 
such a reduction would make it impossible for the railroads 
of this country to get anyone to put their money into this 
vitally essential business." 

— It is estimated that there are in California today on 
the ranches 35,500 electric motors in operation. These 
motors total approximately 483,965 horsepower. Eighty per 
cent of them are used for irrigation pumps. There are about 
10,000 electric ranges in use on California farms. Most of 
this development is the growth of the last five years, accord- 
ing to Mr. Frederick S. Myrtle. 

* * * 

— The attorney-general's office has refused a license to 
act as insurance broker to the inter-insurance bureau of the 
California State Automobile Association upon the ground 
that an insurance society cannot qualify for an insurance 
broker's license, according to the provisions of the code re- 
lating to brokers' licenses. 

* * * 

— The Chinese situation is already affecting insurance in 
that country. A large amount of strike, riot and civil com- 
motion insurance is now being written by American com- 
panies in China as the ordinary fire policies do not cover 
destruction by riot. 



President Coolidge does not want the government to go 
into the power-generating business, it was stated officially 
at the White House in connection with a discussion 
of plans for the Boulder Dam and Colorado river develop- 
ment. The President thinks that the government should 
take care of flood control in such projects and that the gener- 
ating and sale of power be left to private interests. 

* * * 

"How did you make out when that roadhouse was 
raided?" 

"Through the rear door." — Cornell Widow. 

* * * 

She — How did you know me with my mask on : 
He — You forget that we were at the same bathing beach 
together last summer? 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 120,000,000 Rencrvc Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW VORK; 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

S:in FrnnciHCo Oulce: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COll.TIIARD 

Manager AHMt. MannRer 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Mnnufncturern of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. FLUMES 

PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

Snn FrnnclMco, Calif. i „„ \..„ , r* ■■« 

444 11 ,.,-L-..t s* ^"""' Low Ancele*. Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santo Fe Avenae 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



July 4, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



synopsis of the amnval statbment Diamond Jubilee Stickers 

of the Every firm in San Francisco should 

■ .■ . n ii I /-■ emulate the splendid example of the 

Liberty Bell Insurance LO. General Petroleum Corporation, in its 

of Philadelphia, in the State of California, on method of publicity work for the forth- 

the 31st day of December, 1924. made to the ,,,-.,,,:.,„ n,'n m ,„„l *I.,l.:i«„ ^ !,„ u~l 1 : 

Insurance Commissioner of the State of Call- Coming Diamond Jubilee to be held 111 

fornia, pursuant to law. this city September 7th to 12th. This 

assets company has issued Diamond Jubilee 

Real estate stickers, picturing the old pony express 

Mortgages and collateral loans $106,000.00 ■•, ' , , f . , .*, ■> , l ., , ' 

Bonds and stocks 328,881.25 wnicn can be obtained with other lllus- 

AlentJ "*ul'nces J .'' anks : ::::::::::: ::::::::.. 1 : 8 I:!'! ) !!:" Nations of early days in California, at 

Bills receivable taken for risks any General gasoline station These 

Other ledger assets _____ st i c kers arfi pr ; nted ._ colors _ and can 

NON T LEDGER? r assets J62i.8S7.76 be placed in conspicuous positions on 

Total interest and rents due or your automobile, Oil packages, etc.. etc., 

Mf?kervaiue''o'rsec"ur'iti'e"s'"o V e V - $ 4,493.36 anywnere that will attract the eye and 

ot^\^^^-s__:::::::::::::::::::::_:::::::::::::::: f" 6 "^ 11 of th f P ublic - "possible. 

take this excellent means of making 

geXf1^s-nor a dmiuea:::::::: $C26 '63l:2i the coming celebration one that will re- 
Tota, admitted assets iiii^rT doUnd t0 t he fame of our Go lden State. 

LIABILITIES T7 II- t> r- -n^i c t. , 

Net amount of unpaid losses and Franklin T. Grithth of Portland, 

claims Ore., who, as president of the National 

Unearned premiums 171 *- • t ■ 1 *. a ■ ^- • i i 

aii other liabilities 500.00 Ulectric Light Association, presided 

Total liabilities (except capital " vcr th e big convention recently held 

and surplus) $ 500.011 111 San b rancisco, said : 

Capital 250,000.00 "tr„„:i:4.: c <.u 1 *-• r 1 

.Surplus 375,249.87 facilities for the production of elec- 

Total capital, surplus and ~~ ~~ f ic P ower have been developed in Cali- 

other liabilities $625,719.87 tornia to a greater degree than anv- 

henry n. brown. wne re e j se j' n t h e world. California 

1 resident. ,,•,-, ■ . 

Charles S. conki, ix. leads m high tension transmission, hy- 

Secretary. ( | pi g- enera tion development, intercon- 

j. f. magee mci ted systems and spread of service in 

Insurance Manager rural rerrirnrv " 

H. »i. new ha 1,1. „ CO. imai lerruor) . 

210 Buttery St. Phone Suiter 1NN« 

^^^^^^^^^^^n_^^^^^^^^^^^^B I - \. White nf Chicago, director of 

— — the National Committee on Relation of 

Electricity to Agriculture, said: 

"Certainly there is no section of the 
L'nitcil States where rural electric ser- 
vice is si ■ general or where there are 
so main kilowatt hours used per acre 
as in the State of California. In fact, 
so far as known, and we have the re- 
ports of a world-wide survey by the 
I'. S. Department of Commerce as a 
basis for this conclusion, there is no 
place in the world where the develop- 
ment of rural electric service can com- 
pare with what we find in the Pacific 
Coasl region." 




Thelaqgerp t 



©well 

^-^ M_HON AT ri 

Off 



XATIONA1 CREST 



Ambitious 
Frosh — Let me kiss you good-night.' 
She — I'm saving my kisses. 
"Let me add one to your collection. 1 

Lafayette Lyre. 



-the better it getr- 



"Are you going to the fair?" 
"What fair?" 

"The paper says fair here to-day and 
to-morrow." — Lehigh Burr. 



[<*_2»ol 



GEO. W. (ASWEM. 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

I.KOO.OOO rupi Tver* aerved at tae Pnn- 
a_a Pat-Ida International Expoailloa 



There little murderer 

Don't yi m cry. 
lust plead crazy 

And you'll get by. 
S California Wampus. 



He— Let's pet. 

She — Certainly. But what shall we 
— De Pauw Yellow Crab. 



Jean — I'm so proud of my hero's new 
job. 

Val— What's he doing? 

"He says he's the bouncer in a ten- 
nis ball factory." 

— Notre Dame Juggler. 



"What is the greatest necessity in all 
walks of life?" 

"Shoes." — Chicago Phoenix. 



A student husband tells us two may 
live as cheaply as one, but not as 
quietly. — Colorado Dodo. 



"Was your husband cool when you 
told him there was a burglar in the 
house?" 

"I should say he was cool. Why, 
his teeth chattered." — Pitt Panther. 



"Murphy certainly is getting high 
hat these days." 

"Why, how is that? He's only a 
ditch digger." 

"Well, he calls it the banking busi- 
ness." — Colgate Banter. 



First Drunk — My friend's like a 
fountain pen. 

Second Drunk — lb iwzat ? 

"Alius ltinnin' dry — and comin' to be 
filled." — Michigan Gargoyle, 

Attention Club Members! 

Have 
You 
Sampled 
a 
Club 
Business 
Lunch 
at 
SINGLE- 
TON'S 
ALLEY 

CAT 
LUNCH 
INN? 
Delicious. Dainty and Decidedly Different. 




CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 




MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 
*o in t\t Isi 11 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4. 1925 



GOLF 

( Continued from page 10.) 

Potter, the medalist. Mrs. Potter had been playing such 
steady golf for the past few months that it looked as if 
she would annex the finals, but Mrs Sutro played the best 
golf of her career, defeated Mrs. Potter after she had won 
the first two holes. 

They arrived at the half distance all square, and they 
were still deadlocked at the 15th; Mrs. Sutro won the 16th 
and 18th and the match. Mrs. Sutro had a medal of 88. 

In the meantime Mrs. Ernest La Fleur had to go to the 
20th to win from Mrs. J. L. Mesple. Mrs. Sutro had an- 
other battle on her hands the following day when she met 
Mrs. Max Rothchild, the title holder, but cheered by her 
success of the previous day, Mrs. Sutro's golf improved 
to such an extent that there probably wasn't a woman in 
the country that could have given her a good game, so 
it was no wonder that she won the Menlo cup invitational 
tournament, after she had been runner-up to Mrs. Roth- 
child in 1924. 

Mrs. Silas Sinton won the second flight ; Miss Vera 
Bernhard won the third flight; Mrs. E. M. Hooper won 
the fourth flight; Mrs. Theodore Rethers, Jr., won the con- 
solation ; Mrs. Cleveland Forbes won the Defeated Eighth ; 
Mrs. Brent Potter was the medalist; Mrs. Emil Sutro won 
the Menlo Cup Tournament. 



THE BRAVE AND THE FAIR 

(Continued from page 11.) 

Walnut Creek ; American citizenship division, Mrs. A. M. 
Flood ; friendly co-operation with ex-service men and wo- 
men, Mrs. E. C. Peck; American home department, Mrs. 
W. W. Goodrich, San Joaquin ; home extension service, 
Mrs. L. P. Mitchell, Corona ; home economics, Mrs. Good- 
rich ; department of applied education, California history 
and landmarks division, Miss Grace Stoermer; department 
of conservation, birds and wild life division, Mrs. T. F. 
Foley, San Anselmo ; information and library service, Mrs. 
O. N. Hirst, Placerville ; department of fine arts, Mrs. L. 
A. Miller of Marysville ; department of press and publicity, 
Mrs. W. T. Fletter, San Francisco and Mrs. J. R. Dudley. 
Los Angeles; federation news, Miss Jessie Williamson, San 
Jose; department of public welfare, Dr. Bessica F. Raiche, 
Anaheim ; child welfare, Mrs. W. D. James, Hanford ; in- 
dustrial and social relations, Mrs. L. G. Leonard, Oakland ; 
institutional relations, Mrs. Thomas Hanna, Martinez; pub- 
lic health, Dr. Rachel L. Ash, San Francisco ; narcotics. Dr. 
Louise B. Deal, San Francisco; juvenile court, Dr. Miriam 
Van Waters, Los Angeles ; Indian welfare, Mrs. L. J. Gil- 
lespie, Long Beach ; department of international relations, 
Mrs. Minna McGauley, Oakland. 

Standing committees — Emblem, Mrs. G. W. McCoy, Sac- 
ramento ; endowment, Miss Jennie Partridge, San Fran- 
cisco; federation extension, Mrs. K. D. Oliver, Brawley ; 
flying squadron, Miss Ralphine Mills, Lodi ; junior member- 
ship, Mrs. William A. Fitzgerald. Stockton; revision, Mrs. 
Charles C. McKelvey, Los Angeles ; resolutions, Mrs. Leo 
McLaughlin, Pasadena; nominating, Mrs. Robert Fisher 
Carlotta. 



Kind Lady (gazing at a fellow in college hospital) — Poor 
fellow. You must have been through some tight squeezes. 
Sick Lad — Well, the nurses have been pretty good to me. 
— Washington Cougar's Paw. 



"That's no fare/ 
slug. 



said the conductor, as I dropped in a 
— California Pelican. 



"I see where Mary left Atlanta after a short stop." 
"Well, she always was crazy about athletes." 

—Georgia Tech. Yellow Jacket. 



Time 




Card 



THE DEPENDABLE AUTOMOBILE FERRY Route offers 
motorists the shortest find most direct means of transporta- 
tion from Oaklnnd, Snn Frnnclsco, and all points south, to 
Vallejo, Sacramento, Sonoma, Nnpn and Lake Counties and 
all points north. 

Automobile Fare. 55c; Adults, 10c: Children. 5c. 
The lowest ferry rates on San Francisco Hay. 



A.M. 

tesoo 

6:30 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:20 

8:40 

9:00 

0:20 

9:40 

10:00 

10:20 

10:40 

11:00 

11:20 

11:40 

NOON 

12:00 

P.M. 

12:20 

12:40 

1:00 

1:20 

1:40 

2:00 

2:20 



Leave Oakland 
Side at 

■SHORT-WAY" 

P.M. 
2:40 
3:00 



3:20 

3:40 

4:00 

4:20 

4:40 

5:00 

5:20 

5:40 

8:00 

6:20 

6:40 

7:00 

7:20 

7:40 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

0:30 

10:00 

10:30 

11:00 

•11:30 

•12:00 

•12:30 

•1:00 



HI 
O 

> 

UJ 

a> 

in 

I- 

Z 



X 

tn 

I 

> 
< 

H 

o 

I 

(0 

HI 
I 
r- 



Leave Vallejo 

Side at 

MORROW COVE 



A.M. 

t5:45 

0:15 

6:45 

7:15 

7:45 

8:20 

8:40 

9:00 

9:20 

9:40 

10:00 

10:20 

10:40 

11:00 

11:20 

11:40 

NOON 

12:00 

P.M. 

12:20 

12:40 

1:00 

1:20 

1:40 

2:00 



P.M. 

2:20 
2:40 
3:00 
3 :20 
3:40 
4:00 
4:20 
4:40 
5:00 
5:20 
5:40 
11:110 

0:20 

6:40 

7:00 

7:20 

7 145 

8:15 

8:45 

9:15 

9:45 

10:15 

10:45 

•11:15 

•11:45 

•12:15 

•12:45 



•Saturdays. Sundnys, Holidays — Extra Trips During Heavy 
Traffic. tSundays and Holidays only. 

AVEN J. HANFORD, Pres. and Gen. MRr. 



Close-ups of the Great 

and the Near-Great 



Meet them face to face in The 
Chronicle Rotagravure — the 
dramatic figures of the world's 
news. 

Interesting people in all ranks 
of life — beautiful scenes from 
many lands — thrilling events of 
land, sea, and air — all are as- 
sembled in The Sunday 



(El)ronidc 



ROTAGRAVUR5 



July 4, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Search for a Hero 



Estelle Margaret 
Swearingen, author 
of the famous story, 
"Pickaninny," a 
book used in the 
prescribed course of 
reading in the Cali- 
fornia schools, has 
just offered a re- 
ward of $100 (ac- 
cording to the story 
in the Bulletin) to 
any one who finds 
the hero of her 
book. 

The hero was a 
real little boy, a 
bright-eyed, choco- 
late - colored lad 
who used to shine 
the author's shoes 
when shecomtnuted 
from San Francisco 
to Berkeley while 
attending the Uni- 
versity of Califor- 
nia. 

The brilliant 
young writer, who 

taught school in 

Sacramento after 
her graduation from 
the University, has 

written other books 
and short stories, but she is greatly interested in finding 
the hero of "Pickaninny." 

"I have always been interested in little fellows and have 
written many children's stories covering their different ad- 
ventures. 1 love t" write for children, they are SO real ; they 
are sincere critics. Children express their appreciation, 
too, when they feel it; but they must really feci it or they 

don't declare themselves." 

During a recent visit to San Francisco Estelle Mni 
Swearingen was the feted guest of the local literati at 
luncheon and dinners when high tribute was paid the 
author of "Pickaninny" and the other contributions lrom 
her pen. 

Will C. Wood. State Superintendent of Schools, has cn- 
ed Miss Swearingen's book, and Ruth Comfort 

Mitchell wrote the ton-word. 




I.'.slcll.. iHni-K'firi't SwonriiiR't'ii, author of tlu' 

fiimouN ntnry, *'PI(*kiniinny," n rml 

I'hnrni'tpr in life, for whom the 

writer In milking n senrrh. 



Healdsburg Celebrates the Fourth 

On the Redwood Highway, near the Russian River, which 
flows through the Coast Range of our northern counties 
like a stream of melted emeralds, is situated the prosperous 
and beautiful little city of Healdsburg, a town which pos- 
sesses many of the attractions and advantages of a big 
metropolis, and yet is surrounded by a countryside rich in 
natural pastoral loveliness, and agricultural enterprise. 

This community, always notable for its patriotic and 
public spirited citizens, is staging a unique entertainment 
for the Fourth and fifth of July, in commemoration of our 
greatest National holiday, which no doubt will draw throngs 
of visitors from all parts of Sonoma and adjacent counties. 
About a thousand feet below the recently constructed and 
picturesque Russian River Bridge, the local Chamber of 
Commerce has built a dam, and created a very pretty artifi- 
cial lake. Upon this lake the Olympic Club of San Fran- 
cisco will demonstrate some quite wonderful aquatic events 
during the week-end, and there will be baseball games, pa- 
rades, band concerts, horse-shoe pitching contests, and con- 
cessions of all sorts. The speaker of the day will be Emmett 
Seawell, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, whose 
address will be given this morning at 11 :30. 

An organization known as "The Squeedunks" will bur- 
lesque the sports around the plaza at 6:30 this evening. 

The entire program has been financed by popular sub- 
scription among the Healdsburg people, who extend to 
everyone a cordial invitation, and elaborate plans have been 
made to put over a very creditable and interesting affair. 
For those who are contemplating a trip along the beautiful 
Redwood Highway, a visit of two days at Healdsburg can 
be made very interesting and profitable, and the autoist will 
not find it necessary to leave the Highway at any time when 
viewing the Russian River at this point. 



"Do you know that there is a language of perfume? 
Heliotrope, for example, means, '1 love you,' and rose, 'I 
am worthy of you.' " 

"Indeed'! and I suppose the absence of perfumery mean-. 
'I have nothing to 

"No; it means. 'I haven't a scent.' " 

— Stanford Chaparral. 
* * * 

Husband— Knowest thou bow to bringge uppe thy childe? 

Wife- -Certainllie, sluggarde. 

Husband— Then snappe to. Thy childe is at the bot- 
tomme of ye cisterne. —Hamilton Royal Gab 



Brilliant Naval Affairs at Ambassador 

The Ambassador. Los Angeles, was the scene of several 
brilliant affairs in honor of the visiting Midshipmen from 
Annapolis, who arrived on board the U. S. S. New York, 
Arkansas and Utah. The first of these was a special party 
in the Cocoanut Grove in their honor. On this occasion 
elaborate decorations carried out the motif of the Navy, and 
favors were miniature sailor girls and tiny life-boats and 
flags. 

The party at which it is believed the Midshipmen en- 
joyed themselves the most, however, was the Tea Dance 
given in the Ambassador Fiesta Room by the Management 
of The Ambassador and the Los Angeles Chamber of Com- 
merce, and to which debutantes and members of Los 
Angeles' younger set were invited to meet these charming 
yi lung men. 

Abe Lyman offered the services of himself and his orches- 
tra as a compliment to the Midshipmen at this Tea-Dance. 

Mrs. Marion Poindexter, the Ambassador Hostess, was 
assisted in receiving by Los Angeles society matrons. 



Gentleman Jim was polite to the last. He even offered 
his chair to the warden when he was about to be electro- 
cuted. — Williams Purple Cow. 



"Now, Willie. she me a sentence containing the word 
chagrin." . 

"Aw. why don't chagrin once in a while.'' 

— S. California Wampus. 



-Now, I'll tell you 



Young man (entertaining little Mary i- 
mv pet joke. 

'Little Marv — Mavbe vou'd better not. Mother says that 
kind isn't nice. —Washington Dirge. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 



Playgrounds on the Redwood Highway 



By Eugene F. Peckham 




Redwood Highway Conch 



MUCH has been written about 
the wonderful scenery en 
route, when traveling the Red- 
wood Highway. Suffice it to say 
that words will never be able to 
portray what the eye beholds 
when journeying through this 
wonderland. Nature has provided 
beauty spots along this road 
which make it worth while for the 
lovers of the beautiful to visit, 

\\"hile a great deal has been 
written about the Redwood High- 
way, little has been said about 
the playgrounds tributary to the 
wonderful scenery which one 
must pass through on their way 
hich is the end of the Redwood 



to Grants Pass, Oregon 

Highway that starts at Sausalito. 

Marin County has Muir Woods, so familiar to residents 
of the Bay district. Mt. Tamalpais is well known as the 
rendezvous for the enjoyment of out-of-door enthusiasts. 

Sonoma County has many popular resorts which are 
within easy distance of San Francisco. The "Valley of the 
Moon," made famous by Jack London, is one of the most 
favorite localities and the hostelries located in this beautiful 
valley are crowded throughout the summer. Healdsburg 
and vicinity has been known for years as a summer resort. 

McCrays, a mile north of Cloverdale, is well known to 
all. "Pop" McCray is loved by all who know him. The 
hospitality extended to the weary and worn-out traveler 
is indeed a very welcome one. 

We pass through Hopland, Ukiah and Willits, adjacent 
to which are located the Paul Dimmick and Armstrong 
Redwood Parks. The scenery then changes and you are 
confronted with the beautiful redwoods in their majestic 
glory. Many of these forests have never been touched by 
the axe of the woodman and the foliage still is to be seen 
in its original state, growing high around the trunks of 
the sequoias. Lane's Redwood Grove is located about 200 
miles north of San Francisco. This grove has only recently 
been opened and it is the intention to make this a very 
popular playground. 

Hartsook Grove, about nine miles further north, is the 
first playground which is being improved with rapidity to 
meet the needs of the motoring public. When completed, 
this will be one of the most up-to-date groves on the Red- 
wood Highway. At the present time the contractors are 
busy getting the hotel, store, ice plant and cottages com- 
plete to take care of the travel which is getting heavier 
each day. The south fork of the Eel river passes through 
the grove, which affords swimming, boating and fishing. 

Richardson Grove, a mile further on, is located in the 
Humboldt State Redwood Park. This picturesque resort, 
located on the south fork of the Eel river, is in the heart 
of the great redwood forests and mountains of Humboldt 
county. The river, with its sandy beach, passes through 
the grounds, affording delightful swimming and good fish- 
ing. The camp is in one of the largest groves of redwoods 
and its natural surroundings are entrancing. Excellent 
spring water is piped direct from the mountains; complete 
sanitary system is being installed ; rustic cabins are com- 
pletely furnished; hot and cold shower baths and electric 
lights are provided for the guests. A large open dancing 
platform nestles among the redwoods. An auto cam]) is 
run in connection with this playground for those who desire 



to live in the open. A grocery store is maintained with 
a full line of provisions. The dining room is supplied with 
fresh vegetables grown on the grounds. 

Benbow's is the next place visited. It is three miles 
south of Garberville and is ideally located at the junction 
where the East Branch joins the south fork of the Eel river. 
Here is to be constructed an exclusive summer resort >f 
3000 acres subdivided into homesites, from about one to 
three acres <n accordance to the geographical condition of 
the ground. The hotel was recently started, luit owing to 
certain changes being made in the plans, work was inter- 
rupted. Ii is the intention to complete the hotel and at 
the same time dam both rivers, which will create a lake 
with seven miles of shore line surrounding the hotel. Later 
on the golf course will be completed. Each hole will be 
in itself a picture and no two holes will be similar, either 
in character or in length. Social atmosphere will prevail. 
One may join the dance, the game. But, if he desires 
seclusion, the wilderness lies before him. Deer and bear 
around in the surrounding mountains. He may fish the 
stream to its source, cross ridge on ridge, and the bolder 
huntsman who does not ask a trail, find- a country un- 
touched by man. One may motor up the beautiful Red- 
wood Highway to the very door of his cottage, swing his 

hammock either under an oak, fir, alder, spruce, pepperw 1 

or redwood, rest and read, golf and swim, and boat, follow 
the bridle path around the edge of the river — over the 
hills — the whole place is his. its every privilege belongs to 
him — a great exclusive estate. 

Two and a half miles north of Garberville we come to 
Redway's, which is located on the south fork of the Eel 
river. The approach to this tract is along a straight piece 
of highway. Part of this tract has been subdivided and 
owners are busily engaged in building their summer homes. 
A golf course is planned which will afford the property 
owners much opportunity to enjoy their favorite pastime. 
The swimming in the river is ideal and is enjoyed by many. 
The south fork of the Eel river passes through the prop- 
erty and fishing may be indulged in by those who possess 
a home in this delightful location. 

Many playgrounds of less import prevail en route, until 
Klamath Glen is reached, seventy-five miles north of 
Eureka. Crossing the Klamath river, via Eerry, you motor 
through the town of Requa and turning to the right, drive 
to the Klamath river to a point near the' Douglas- Memorial 
Bridge, which is being constructed, to be completed in 1926. 
About August first a temporary bridge will be ready, thus 
eliminating the inconvenience of the ferrv. Leaving the 




Near ltfch;ird Grove 



July 4, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



.' *' 


lis 


'^IB 






^2 ' f 






.1 • 






* ' 






: 






jflBIBsi^'i 


y .,..■ . 


SjWBBHff [ ' 




iByFiT^' 





Straight 



Couricsy ".Save H.ilwoods League" 

Souih Dyervllle Flat, Redwood Highway 

bridge to the right, you motor several miles to Klamath 
Glen. People who are interested in this remarkable loca- 
tion are invited to make this section of the state their 
summer home. This homesite property has mam ad- 
vantages which will appeal to those interested. Klamath 
(ilen has many things to offer in magnificence and beauty, 
close proximity to ocean, river, highway and mountain 
country. Delightful, cool summer climate offers oppor- 
tunities for rest, recreation, seclusion, as well as amuse- 
ment, entertainment and sports. 

The last playground, before reaching Crescent City, is 
Giant Redwood Park, about eighteen miles south, Some of 
the largest redwoods ever seen by the writer are located 
in this park, composed of 2700 acres. It is the only play- 
ground fronting on the Pacific ocean. Mere a beautiful 
beach affords ideal bathing facilities. Many streams run 
through the property, allowing the ardent fisherman to 
fulfill his heart's desire. While cool breezes ma) | 
at the ocean side, one simply has to explore the hack coun- 
try, where you may venture into warm dells and bask in 
the sunshine. Plans are being prepared which will enable 
the management to take care of all those who wish to take 
advantage of the wonderful resources offered to those who 
desire to play in the playgrounds on the Redwood Highway. 



"1 hear that Phil went to a masquerade last week dis- 
guised as Adam." 

"He must have gotten a great kick .'in of that." 

"He did." — Yale Record. 



Gentleman Jim was polite to the last, lie even offered 
his chair to the warden when he was about to be electro- 
cuted. — Williams Purple Cow. 



Back East 

Roundtrip sumi 




to Chicago 

and the East — through beautiful Ameriean 
River Canyon, via Ogden and Great Salt Lake 
— this daily service. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Overland Limited 

Connects at Chicago with morning trains to all 
eastern points. 

Luxurious accommodations, barber, valet, maid; 
plus Southern Pacific dining car service. 

2 other trains daily this way 



St. Louis Express to Denver and St. Louis. 
Standard and tourist sleepers to Kansas City. 
Pacific Limited — Standard and tourist sleepers 
to Omaha and Chicago. 

For fares, reservations and full 
information, ask any agent. 



Southern Pacific Lines 



65 Geary Street 
Sutter 4000 



Third St. Static 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the-** 

VALLFYo/ the MOON 

Our Specially — "Sirttks U "ith Mushrooms.** 

CI ran Room.. Clean T.inrn. CI ran Everything 

\ i ii -Miinnu CoOSlj'l Fjmnm Krsnrls and Minrrnl (Warm Waitr) Sw 
Tanks From This Hotel. 

Rale* Exceptionally Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 




MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

*]hosEKent Shirts JhosEKeni 

w sXzl *m? 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
2*> Kr utmr Street Phone Kearny 3714 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
j Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club. 

TOO great an emphasis cannot be 
placed upon the value of the auto- 
mobile in the field of education. 

California is a wonderful laboratory 
for experiments of this nature and 
there is no district within the borders 
of this state that cannot be made to 
perform the functions of visualizing to 
the onlooker the backgrounds of his- 
tory. In spite of all the work that has 
been done in the field ^of educational 
psychology, in spite of the Montessori 
system, the doctrines of Freud, and the 
growth of theoretical education as a 
necessary adjunct to the preparation of 
a teacher, the teaching of history and 
English literature remains much the 
same as it was fifty years ago. 

We find visualization emphasized in 
almost every other field of education. 
In physics, laboratory work is an im- 
portant corollary of theory. In math- 
ematics and in language study, we find 
that figures and the printed page add 
the practical side to the theoretical. 
But in history we force the child-mind 
to grasp ideas beyond the scope of his 
mentality and fail to emphasize the 
important item of visualization. Here 
is where California's peculiar config- 
uration and the motor car offer pos- 
sibilities of developing that phase in 
teaching. 

The motion-picture industry has 
shown how California may be used as 



a background for practically any period 
of history and any location. The hills 
of southern California have served as 
the battleground of the warring hosts 
of Scotland in the filming of Macbeth ; 
the forest-clad slopes have provided a 
Sherwood forest for a Pobin Hood and 
in the palm-clad gorge of the San Ja- 
cinto mountains the Arabian setting for 
an Oriental story has been found. 

There is many a canyon in the rolling 
hills of Marin, Sonoma, Contra Costa 
and San Mateo that reproduces in re- 
markable fashion the English scenes 
which served as a background for the 
plays of Shakespeare. If the child in 
studying the works of the bard of 
Stratford is familiar with these scenes 
of the California landscape, he will be 
the better able to visualize the back- 
ground for the immortal dramas which 
he studies. California's gardens con- 
tain all of the flowers which the Eng- 
lish poets and dramatists have /em- 
ployed in the decoration of the fahric 
of their handiwork. 

Historical scenes can be recast in 
California settings. The plains of 
Marathon, the snow-capped Olympus, 
the vale of Chamouni, the Lake dis- 
trict of England, the grove of Fontaine- 
bleau and the fields of Picardy, the rich 
delta regions of the Netherlands, the 
desert wastes of the Sahara, the tem- 
perate clime of Sicily and the colorful 
bazaars of the Orient — all are pictures 
that may be reproduced in California. 

There is no scene in the whole range 
of history or literature which may not 
be brought more forcefully to the mind 
of the student by a close acquaintance- 
ship with the scenic lands of California. 
Lake county is a fitting background 
for an appreciation of the poems of 
Wordsworth ; Tamalpais may be trans- 
formed by the imagination into the 
Horatian Soracte; while the wild for- 
est-clad banks of the northern Sacra- 
mento are as inspiring to the observing 
eye as are those of the scenic lands of 
the Rhine. 

Truly this golden state of ours is 
an ideal natural laboratory wherein 
may be visualized the pageant and 
progress of the world. 



First Shade — All my illusions about 
St. Peter have been destroyed. 

Second Shade — Go on. 

"When I came to the pearly gates he 
swore at me. 

"What!" 

"Go to hell," he said. 

— Yale Record. 



SNOWY SHASTA'S CHARM 
By Eleanore F. Ross 

THAT part of our Golden State 
where Coast Range and high 
Sierra Nevada meet, at the juncture 
of which lordly Shasta rears his white 
head, should prove the Mecca of the 
motorist at this time of the year ; for 
the meadows through which one jour- 
neys are still green in many places ; the 
streams are full and tumultuous, and 
when the mountainous district is 
reached, the sparkle of snowy peaks de- 
lights and refreshes the eye. 

Unlike the rounded hills of the bay 
region, the Coast Range in Siskiyou 
rise with rocky formation of granite 
and slate into rugged and precipitous 
peaks. The Sierra in Siskiyou, p.lso, 
consist in great part in rough and 
rugged buttes, much of the country 
comprising canyons, gorges, ravines, 
abrupt mountain walls, precipices and 
pleasant valleys. 

I remember the first time I beheld 
"Castle Crags." It was towards morn- 
ing, from the drawing room window of 
a train, and almost all of the night I 
had watched from my couch near the 
window the strange new country 
through which we were passing. We 
swept along through small sleeping 
towns; on the verdure hung banks of 
rushing rivers; into the cool blackness 
of mountain gorges. The resinous 
breath of pines and fir came through 
the casement, mingled with the sig- 
nificant odor of burning brush, and the 
night was hot and still, and faintly il- 
lumined with a new moon. 

With the first grayness of coming 
day I glimpsed the strangely ancient 
looking buttes peering over the forest- 
clad hills, a whitish dun color; as if 
weathered and aged by aeons of time, 
and having the form of towers and bat- 
tlements of a group of remote and long- 
forgotten castles. I think these strange 
buttes impressed me more than even 
Mt. Shasta itself, for I had never seen 
anything like them before, while snowy 
peaks were familiar objects to my eye. 

I wonder when again I will behold 
that interesting country, and I envy the 
driver of the Jordan "scout" car. sent 
out recently by the Chase-Morrill 
Company, to visit this scenic section, 
which brought back numerous photo- 
graphic records and news of road condi- 
tions in that vicinity. 



A woman doesn't always get the last 
word — sometimes she is talking to an- 
other woman. — Pitt Panther. 



Look for the 
GREEN and 
WHITE 
SIGN 



GENERAL 

GASOLINE & 
LUBRICANTS 



Meet Your 
General 
Dealer Today 



July 4, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



Mr. Blabbitt on the Fourth 



u 



THE Glorious Fourth is with us again." The foregoing 
statement is not original and hasn't been for a hundred 
years or so. I should say "The glorious 'fourth of one per 
cent' is with us still." Either is true — we glory in one and 
are depressed by the other. 

Parades, picnics, orations and mellow liquors were the order 
of the day, not so long ago, in celebrating the anniversay of 
American Independence. Firecrackers were fired. Firecrackers 
fired houses and barns and fire engines clanged noisily to scenes 
of firecracker fires. Well lubricated bands played patriotic airs 
and red faced marchers stumbled over squirming urchins in 
the wake of the mayor's chariot. Lines of spectators, ten deep, 
strewed the path of the paraders with peanut shells and deter- 
mined individuals fought equally hard for the privilege of gain- 
ing the front ranks or of leaving them for a visit to resorts 
equipped with swinging doors, glassware and saw dust. 

In the parks, perennial Fourth of July orators gave stock- 
speeches — ostensibly spontaneously ; actually, by following the 
methods of the man who recognized the famous Addison Sims, 
of Seattle, after ten long years. Pre-prohibition speakers 
always insisted on a pitcher, containing water, and a jelly glass 
being placed on a table at their right. The pitchers, at any rate, 
were never touched and the glasses, in no event, were lifted. 
Water does not mix well with the stuff of which orations are 
made. 

At night, skyrockets and other pyrotechnic concoctions ca- 
reened drunkenly across the heavens and. toward morning, 
revellers made their way homeward in more or less the same 
manner. 

Now, all the foregoing is written from plain unadulterated 
hearsay, so don't lake offense, Historians arc notoriously in- 
clined to exaggerate. 

The vacuous Fourth of today comes as a result of regular 
and insidious changes, spread over a period of years. Befo' 
the wall, reformers and underwriters took a stand against un- 
dertakers and made Independence Day sanitary by making it 
sane, in doing away with fireworks. This was a good dim;;, a- 
fireworks are not worth the powder to blow them up. \ few 
years later, however, other reformers, after ages of plugging, 
succeeded in doing away with fire water also. This made the 
greatest number of corns suffer. 

Nowadays it is almost certain death to celebrate national lib- 
erty alcoholically. "Say It With Flowers" is the aftermath for 

unwise citizens. Children used to suffer as the result of pla\ - 
ing with fireworks. Grownups and adolescents get theirs, to- 
day, from playing with lire water. 

You may say, quite correctly, that my reasoning is narrow. 

as it deals only with the city, its dwellers and a contraband sub- 
ject, This leads to my conclusion. 

(. it\ folks (lock to the country every Sunday and holiday. 
Therefore, one might reasonably believe. "Every holiday is 
Fourth of July on the farm." There are few restrictions on 
shooting off fireworks in meadow- or wools and. seemingly, 
none on tearing down fences or scattering papers and sardine 
cans along highways and over fields. The "wide, open -paces" 
have come to be wide open, in every way. City folks simply 
must have vents for their fiery patriotism and a Fourth in the 
sticks gives them an opportunity — when the ranchers have 
gone to the cit) to celebrate. 

What has brought about the change — the automobile or pro- 
hibition ? 

Which i- the more necessary to a Glorious Fourth — gasoline, 
firecrackers or fire water? 

For the best answer. I am tempted to otter a quart or a docen 

of cither. 



Your reply must be in before midnight, if you are not all in 
before then. 



J Graney's 

1 Billiard Parlor 

The Finest in the World 



924 Market Street 



San Francisco 



-TRADE MARK. _. _ ^^ ^ 

VALvoliNE Motor_Oils 

Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 
VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 



462 Bryant St., San Francisco 



122 Center St., Los Angeles 




I - TEL. FRANKLIN 38K5 

IMetnl Work Apper- 
tninlng to Automo- 
lil lew — Ox y- Acetylene 
Welding — Ulnck- 
Nilifthing, 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

have: your cars washed and greased 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rate*, 35c per day! 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floor* for Service and Storage of Automobiles 




Travel to Europe via 

"The Comfort Rout*" 



Atk for Illustrated Book 

Norway Cruises From England 

Bt the L*ry«*t I'mumi Ship "Arrirlun" 

THE ROYAL MAIL LINE 



570 Markrl Slrert. Sin Fraaeiics 



The Best Costs No More 



! La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 TWELFTH ST., S. F. 



PHONE MARKET 916 j 

............ . . . 4 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1925 



SUMMONS TO ESTABLISH TITLE 



Dividend Notices 



NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE UNDER 
DEED OF TRUST 



Action No. 38,652. 

In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

William N. Gerrard, et al., Plaintiffs, vs. 
all persons claiming any interest in, or lien 
upon the real property herein described or 
any part thereof. Defendants. 

The People of the State of California: To 
all persons claiming any interest in, or lien 
upon, the real property herein described or 
any part thereof, defendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and an- 
swer the complaint of William N. Gerrard, et 
al., plaintiffs, filed with the Clerk of the 
above-entitled Court and City and County, 
within three months after the first publica- 
tion of this Summons, and to set forth what 
interest or lien, if any, you have in or upon 
that certain real property or any part there- 
of, situated in the City and County of ,San 
Francisco, State of California, particularly 
described as follows: 

First: Beginning at a point on the north- 
erly line of Broadway Street, distant thereon 
one hundred (100) feet westerly from the 
corner formed by the intersection of the 
northerly line of Broadway Street with the 
westerly line of Octavia Street and running 
thence westerly along said northerly line of 
Broadway Street thirty -seven (37) feet, six 
(6) inches; thence at a right angle northerly 
one hundred (100) feet; thence at a right 
angle easterly thirty-seven (37) feet six (6) 
inches; and thence at a right angle southerly 
one hundred (100) feet to the point of begin- 
ning; being part of WESTERN ADDITION 
BLOCK Number 192. 

Second: Beginning at a point on the north- 
erly line of Broadway Street, distant thereon 
eighty (80) feet easterly from the corner 
formed by the intersection of the northerly 
line of Broadway Street with the easterly 
line of Laguna Street, and running thence 
easterly along said northerly line of Broad- 
way Street, forty-one (41) feet, six (6) 
inches; thence at a right angle northerly one 
hundred and thirty-seven (137) feet, six (6) 
inches; thence at a right angle westerly 
forty-one (41) feet, six (6) inches; and thence 
at a right angle southerly one hundred and 
thirty-seven (137) feet, six (6) inches to the 
point of beginning. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless 
you so appear and answer, the plaintiffs will 
apply to the Court for the relief demanded in 
the complaint, to- wit: That it be adjudged 
that the plaintiffs are the owners of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that their 
title to said property be established and 
quieted; that the Court ascertain and deter- 
mine all estates, rights, titles, interests and 
claims in and to said property, and every part 
thereof, whether the same be legal or equi- 
table, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consists of mortgages 
or liens of any description; that plaintiffs re- 
cover their costs herein and have such other 
and further relief as may be met in the 
premises. 

Witness my hand and the Seal of this Court. 
Dated April 22, 1925. 

(Seal) H. I. MULCREVT. 

Clerk. 
By J. J. RAFFERTY, 

Deputy Clerk. 
L. W. LOVEY, 

Attorney for Plaintiffs. 



Phone Sutteh 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

[Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street at Grant A venue 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

526 California St. (and Branches), 
San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending- June 30th, 192.", 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four and one-quarter <4 J /i, per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, payable on and after 
July 1st, 1925. Dividends not called for are 
added to the deposit account and earn in- 
terest from July 1st, 1925. Deposits made on 
or before July 11th, 1925, will earn interest 
from July 1st, 1925. 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 



BANK OF ITALY 

Head Office and San Francisco 
Branches 



For the half year ending June .10, 192T.. a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four <4> 
per cent per annum on all saving's deposits, 
payable on and after July 1, 1925. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same 
rate of interest as the principal from July 1, 
1925. Saving's deposits made on the first busi- 
ness day of any month (or on or before the 
tenth day of January. April, July and Oc- 
tober) will earn interest from the firsl "f 
that month; deposits made after said date 
will earn interest from the first of the fol- 
lowing" month. 

JAMES A. BACIGALTJPI, President. 



ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and 
Sacramento Streets. 

North Beach Branch, 

Corner Columbus Avenue and Broadway. 

Columbus Branch, 

Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets. 



For the half year ending June 30, 1925. a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
and one-quarter (4 1 /, ) per cent per annum on 
all savings deposits, payable on and after 
July 1. 1925. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same 
rate of interest from July 1, 1925. Deposits 
made on or before July 1ft, 1925, will earn 
interest from Julv 1, 1925. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY 

Main Office. 

Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets 

Mission Office. 

Corner Valencia and 22nd Streets. 



For the half year ending June 30. 1925. a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four (4i 
per cent per annum on all deposits, pavable 
on and after July 1. 1925. Dividends not 
drawn will be added to depositors' accounts 
become a part thereof, and will earn divi- 
dends from July 1. 1925. Deposits made on 
or before July 10. 1925. will earn interest from 
July 1, 1925. 

E. J. TOBIN. President. 



HUMBOLDT BANK 

783 Market Street, near Fourth 
Bush-Montgomery Branch, Mills Bldg. 



For the half year ending June 30, 1925, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four (41 
per cent per annum on savings deposits pay- 
able on and after July 1, 1925. Dividends 
not called for bear interest from July 1 1925 
Money deposited on or before Julv 10 ' 1925' 
will earn interest from July 1 1925" 

H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier 



WHEREAS, Stephen H. Risdon and Amy 
Risdon, his wife, both of the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California, did 
execute a certain deed of trust, bearing dale 
the 14th day of July, 1921. in City Title In- 
surance Company, a corporation, as trustee, 
for the benefit and security of Alvah M. John- 
son, which deed of trust was recorded in the 
office of the County Recorder of the City 
and County of San Francis..-. .. Slate of Cali- 
fornia, .m the 19th day ..I' .Inly. 1921. in 
Liber 912 of Official Records of Deeds, at 
page 205: and 

WHEREAS, the said Alvah M. Johnson 
thereafter sold, assigned and transferred 
unto Catherine M. Johnson all of his right, 
title and interest as beneficiary in and to 

the said note and deed of trust, in and by 
a certain assignment recorded on November 
5th, 1921. in Liber 919 of Official Records al 
page 106, in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California; and 
WHEREAS, default hns been made i.v the 

Said Stephen H. Risdon and Amy Risdon, his 
wife. In the payment of do- promissory not, 
secured by said deed of trust, and 

WHEREAS, the said Catherine Al. Johnson 
has demanded that said trustee, City Title 
insurance Company, a corporation, should 
forthwith proceed to sell a part of th, ,, ., 
property described in said deed of trusl to 
satisfy said indebtedness; and 

wi-i EREAS, ill.- first 1..11 ci 1 of real eats ti 
described in said deed of trust has bei 1 
heretofore released t.. said Stephen 11 RIs- 
don and Amy Risdon, his wife' 

NOW. THEREFORE, in a, rdanee with 

Ho- terms and under the authority of said 
deed ..I trust, the said City Title Insurance 
1 ompany, a corporation, as such trustee does 
hereby give notice that on Saturday, the nth 
day ..I July. 1925. al the hour of 1] o'clock 

a.. m - pl said day, at the office of t 

rttle Insurance Company, a corporation, al 
216 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, it win sell at public auction to the 
highest bidder, tor currenl lawful monei ol 
the United sen 9 of Amerli a, thai part of 
the real estate described In said deed of 
trust hereinafter described In order to sat- 
isfy and pay Ihe amount due and unpaid 

on the aforesaid promissory n..t.-. together 
with the expenses of sale necessarily in- 
curred, and together with all further 'sums 
which have or which may hereaftei becom. 

due said Catherine M. Johnson, purauai 

the terms of said deed of 1 1-1,-1 

That the said real property, with the im- 
provements thereon, described In said deed 

pl trust and t., be sold as above indicated 
IS situate lying and being In th.- City and 
l ounty ol San Francisco. State of California 
and more particularly described as follows! 

Commencing at a point on the easterly 

line of Thirty-eighth Avenue distant 
thereon one hundred and fifty (150) 
feet southerly from the polnl formed by 
tile intersection of the easterly line of 
Ihirty-eighth Avenue with the' souther- 
ly line of Lincoln Way. and running 

thence southerly along th- si ust. -,-lv 

line of Thirty-eighth Avenue twenlv-llv'e 
i2m feet, thence at a right angle east- 
erly one hundred and twenty feel tl^O) 
thence at a right angle northerly twenty' 
hve <2i. 1 feel, and thence at a right angle 
westerly one hundred and twenty 11:11 
teet to the easterly line of Thirty-eighth 
Avenue and the point of mencement 

numY?er a G3T ti0n "< °" tSi "" Land BI °<* 
CITY TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 

H. W. Mlloxi, 

rse a n BERT D ' PAOLmELLi"*' 

l&eau Secretary. 

Dated: June 16th. 1925 Trustee. 

GLENSOR, CLEWB AND VAN DINE 

Attorneys for Catherine M. Johnson 



T N h a ° me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther It be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com* 
plete sa t i sf ac- 
tion. There Is a 
grade for e ,- ery 
need. Ask your 
, . _l- _- . -. *, _ printer or sta- 

WESSm m n you n s e amP?es ShOW 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 







« ■.'; : i ! ) 






ffiw^Si 



One Hundred and Fifteenth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



SAVINGS 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 



COMMERCIAL 






One of the Oldest Banks In California 
the Assets of which have never been increased by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 



Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



JUNE 30th, 1925 
Assets — 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other Bonds and 

Securities (total value $28,882,870.85), standing on books at $26,161,714.02 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 64,950,692.16 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 983,955.72 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value $1,765,000.00), 

standing on books at 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value over $95,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value $479,081.25), standing on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 10,134,239.43 



Total $102,232,604.33 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $98,132,604.33 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,100,000.00 

Total $102,232,604.33 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of fune, 1925. 

(SEAL) 0. A. EGGERS, Xotary Public. 



js 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4:H) per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 

AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 
Deposits made on or before July 11th, 1925, will earn interest from July 1st, 1925. 












~)ach car Ojberafed\^ 
by reliable 
c/iaujfeurs 
u/Ao //loroud/r/y under- 
stand tlte/r Jjust/tess 



This means that jrou 
can dispense \<. Ith a II 
worries as i«> personal 
Security when vising 
our oara Our d i 
are careful and they 
n.'v. i ur de- 

a for safe 




Phone Qrajalone -"" 
I63S rim* Street 

Snn rmnclnco 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 

Snn Frnnrliiro — Burllncnnic 

West. TIKI JTs 



^Hjgjgp* 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 




N W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GRAY FOLDING TRUNK RACKS 

Afford Safety and Convenience 




Gray Folding Trunk Racks add to the appear- 
ance and increase the usefulness of every car. 

Sturdily made of the finest materials, mechani- 
cally correct and easily attached to any car Distributed by 
without drilling the car frame. 



Prices $20.00 to $55.00 



THE SAFETY HOUSE INC. 

Automobile Safety Essentials 
1157 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



SAVE MONEY! 

Motorists Should Travel Via 

Golden Gate Ferry 

Between 

Sausalito a?id San Francisco 

Summer Schedule Now Effective 



FOUR FAST BOATS 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 



A. O. Stewart 
President 



Harry E. Speas 
lice-Pres. and Gen'l. Mgr. 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

£ RATES— Ter "Day. single, £urof>ean Tlan 



The tenter 
for ThtatTC, 
^Bankt, Shopt 

e Ptea*t it-rite 
for ^Booklet 



$2.50 lo S4.00 
3.50 to 5.00 
6.00 to 8.00 



120 rooms with running water 
220 rooms with bath 
160 rooms with bath 

Double. $4.00 up 

Also a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
lites, some in period furnishings with grand piano. 



' fire place and bath. SJ0O0 up. 

LARGE AND WELL EQUIPPED SAMPI E ROOMS 

r^A^CHO QOLF CLUB] 

L available to all guests J 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 

^Manager 



nk 



HOTEL/ 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles 



jJL. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 185b 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PM 



"*? 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JULY 11th, 1925 



LOS ANGELES 




COASl Si'lTF, S. P. R. R. 



PHOTO BY MOULIN 



El Pi/mo Beach 
Where the bread wren leans against the land. 



The Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society 

HIBERNIA BANK 
Incorporated 186 + 

HEAD OFFICE 

Cor. Market, McAllister and Jones Sts. 

mission office 

Cor. Valencia and 22nd Sts. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

ASSETS ------ $82,069,645.96 

RESERVE FUND- - 6,173,442.29 



OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A. M. TO 3 P. M. 



OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY FROM 
10 A. M.T0 8 P. M. 



SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AT MISSION OFFICE 



CROCKER NATIONAL BANK 

of San Francisa i 



Condition at (he close of business 

JUNE 30, 1925 

RESOI'RrE? 

Loans and Discounts ...$29,283,607.99 

U. S. Bonds and Cert'ficates 15.350.015.85 

Other Bonds and Securities 1,482,683.46 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of S. F 225.000.00 

Customers' Liability Under Letters ol Credii 3.114,959.27 

Cash and Sight Exchange 7,079.207.42 



$56,535,473.99 
LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 2,000.000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 7,385,674.56 

Circulation 2000,000.00 

Letters of Credit 3J95.620.65 

Deposits 41,454.173.78 

,. 

$56,535,473.99 " 



OFFICERS 

Wm. H. Crocker, Pretidenl 



Jas. J 
I. B. 
WillJu: 
F. G. 
D. J. 
C. W. 
B. D. 



Pagan \ ice-President 

McCargar \ ice-President 

n W. Crocker Vice-President 

\\ illie \ ice-President and Cashier 

Murphy Vice-President 

Fhner Assistant Cashier 

Dean \ssislanl Cashier 

H. C. Simpson, Manager Foniun Department 
H. H. Hai-lil. Assistant Manager Foreign Deparl 
G. Fen- Baldwin, Auditor 



A. C. Bead ..... 
W. D. Lux 
J. A. Bounds 
E. T. Harrison 
Geo. J. Kern 



Assistant Ca: 
Assistant Cai 
Assistant I ., 
. Assistant Cat 
Assistant c.i 



J. F. Sullivan. Jr Assistant Cashier 



Wm. H. Crockei 
Tcmpleton Crock, 
Jas. J. Fagan 
George W. Scott 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

er \t illiam W. Crocker 

B. S. Moore 
Chas. E. Green 



S. F. B. Morse 
J. B. MeCargoi 
A. G. Griffin 
Atholl MeBear 




; : 



I u 



OVERHEAD VALVE AND V-MOTOR SPECIALISTS 

(syd) CONNELL & I'Akl'lX (jim) 

Ins pecti on Free 
Guaranteed (O&Htlctfld) Service 

Phone Prospect 387 H2i Ellis St., San Fiiancisco 

Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 



~7 
t 
t 
t 



I 







sti'iiion i.\ i i.i. 

I'ltlM'll'AI, l I'll US Oh 

(' VI.IFtlltN I \ 



Oiikliind 
III*. 14. h Street 
sun I'^rnnclatcu i 

41 firnnl Avenue | 



Do Your Linens Justice 

La Grande & Whi'e's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 TWELFTH ST., S. F. 'PHONE MARKET 916 i 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

£ RATES— 'Per "Day. single, £urope<in <Ptan 



The center 

for Theatre) 
'Bon*.. Shopt 


120 rooms with running water S2.50to J4.00 
220 room* wiih bath - - - 3.50 co 5.00 
1 60 room* with bath - - 6.00 to 8.0O 


T tea it •write 

for -Booklet 


Double. $4.00 up 
Also a number of large and beautiful room* and 



suite*, *ome in period furnishings with grand piano, 
fire place and bath. S1V 00 up. 



LARGE AND WELL EQUIPPED SAMP1 E ROOMS 

r^A'TiCHO gOLF CLUB] 
L available to all guestsJ 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 
Stfanagtr 



nk 



HOTEL 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles N . . 




Established July 20. 1656 

SAN f^©5S5) 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 



Th c nn Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriot' 
t> f r nm 1RS4 to 1925 Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephon. 
<3»ttPr 8535 Entered at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. London, 
suiter o ';g n gi ailt i Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., JULY 11, 1925 



No. 2 



In or Out of Love 



Teamster or society Beau Brummel, each is affected the 
same way; with a desire to carry off the beloved (no mat- 
ter how much she weighs) to some remote spot, — he hasn't 
the least idea where. 

* * * 

The beloved, whether laundry worker or society bud or 
matron, is generally willing to be carried off (no matter 
what her avoirdupois) to some remote spot ; only her ideas 
are more definite regarding destination. 



The lover is always imbued with the idea that this is the 
only time he has ever really loved, although this particular 
passion doesn't differ in the least degree from other af- 
fairs in the past. 

* * * 

The beloved loves to hear him repeat the_above, al- 
though she knows that his love for her is a 17th or 30th 
edition of all his other affairs in the past 



The right kind of a lover take- a delight in buying 

presents for the beloved, and the right kind of a mistress 

is always delighted with them, whether they happen to 

be fur coats or boxes of candy. 



Both the man and the woman air possessed with the 

knowledge that their particular case i- very, very different 
from anyone else's! 

* * * 

Love hits the middle-aged human much harder than it 
dor- the young stripling. It is like the last final flare 
of the burning log before it flickers into ashes. 

* * * 

It is like the song the -wan sings before it- death. 

* * * 

It is a fragrance made stronger because it- principals 
realize how evanescent it must be. 



The man -ee- youth and beauty in the woman, no 
matter how wrinkled -he may he: tin think- of 

the man as manly even though he doesn't possess half 



her strength. 



"The sensation-love can weary," states Luis Debayle, 
"the sentiment-love always enchants. The former has, by a 
physiological law, its limits; the latter, like every sublimity 
of the spirit, has not yet been measured. The former is sub- 
ordinate to conditions of life and health; the latter is un- 
limited and transcends at times the confines of the tomb." 

* * * 

He says again: "Love is the principle, the reason and the 
aim of all human actions." 

* * * 

Each is to the other a nucleus, round which an indifferent 

world revolves. 

* * * 

To be in love is to be miserably happy or happily mis- 
erable. 

* * * 

Say- Sophocles: "Love. love unconquered ... no mortal 
can escape thee, nor any among ephemeral men." 

( hie ha- never lived who has not felt love in his heart 
at least once. 

* * * 

< hie must love truly to make himself loved. 

* * * 

"In true love it i.- the soul that envelops the body," 

affirms Nietzsche. 

* * * 

Xo heart loves only once. The hidden fountain of sen- 
timent bursts forth among the very rocks of disillusion- 
ment throughout one'- whole existence. 

* * * 

Dante called love the fountain of all virtues. 

* * * 

Love i- a gem which the lowliest pauper can posses-, 
and which i- often denied the wealthiest man. 

* * * 

Those who scoff the loudest at love, often fall the deepest 
in it- meshes; so beware! 

* * * 

To love one person honestly, means to love the whole 

w i irld. 

» * * 

Love is the great Commoner. 

* * * 

It i- an hat elevates the lowly and level- those 

of ee. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1925 



There will be money wasted on 
The Agreement Is Legal the legal fight which the 

enemies of the city threaten to 
wage against the agreement, giving temporary power for 
the disposal of the Hetch Hetchy power. It will be money 
wasted, we repeat, for the agreement is sound and will 
stand. It is an agreement of agency; that is all there is 
to it. It may seem to be involved, that is only a matter 
of words. It is not really involved ; it is a matter of agency. 

The best lawyers analyzing it have arrived at the con- 
clusion that it is an agency agreement. The attorney for 
the Chamber of Commerce says: "A contract should come 
within the clear terms of an agency agreement, under which 
the gross revenue of the city would be dependent on the 
rates charged and the return to the agent for his services 
would be in the nature of a fixed fee or a unit price per unit 
of power handled. A contract would be definitely fixed on 
the interim that is expected to develop and should be 
terminable by the city upon an agreed period of notice and 
the city can fix the date on which it can secure possession 
of its own distribution facilities." 

There are the essentials as stated by an outsider, so 
to speak, who looks at the matter from a common sense and 
practical point of view, as well as from an essentially pro- 
fessionally technical point of view. 

Does the agreement meet those conditions? He would 
be a bold man who could argue otherwise. The city legal 
staff approves of the way in which it is drawn. The con- 
formity with the Raker Act appears to be very obvious 
and there is no doubt at all in the minds of most students 
of such matters that the contract is a valid contract. 

But as we have already said, there are those who must 
litigate and such will not be satisfied until they have spent 
money and time in a vain chase after nothing. 



Recent investigations appear to prove 
A Jest of Fate that Mary Queen of Scots was wrongfully 
punished by imprisonment for eighteen 
years, prior to her execution. That imprisonment was based 
upon the hypothesis that she was guilty of participation 
in and connivance with the death of her husband, Lord 
Darnley. This notion of her guilt again was based on the 
statements in certain letters that were found in a silver 
casket and which are known as the "casket letters." In 
these letters, written to Lord Bothwell, her lover, were 
statements which seemed to implicate Mary. All historians 
have accepted these letters and the general estimate of Mary's 
character has been based on them. 

It is practically certain now that the letters are for- 
geries. The handwriting experts with the British Home 
Office, putting them to the same tests as they put hand- 
writing today are convinced not only that Mary did not 
write the letters, but that they were written by her private 
secretary and that they were slipped into her silver port- 
folio by those in the pay and confidence of her enemies. 
Mary always maintained that she had never written them, 
that they were fraudulent and forgeries. Now modern 
science comes to her aid and rehabilitates her reputation. 

Of course, these letters ruined her life. Without them 
there would have been no imprisonment and she would 
not have incurred the hatred of Elizabeth, who, on the 
strength of the letters, considered her a shameless mur- 
deress. Without the imprisonment, she would not have 
been tempted into the plot against Elizabeth which destroyed 
her. Her enemies for once were utterly triumphant and' no 



power of truth came to the aid of the vanquished queen. 

Photography and an expert study of handwriting has 
done more than all the speculations of historians or the 
reflections of philosophers. 



Some of us have labored long and ardu- 
State Economy ously, also thanklessly, through the period 
of extravagance to point out that we 
shall have to pay for the careless and wanton habits which 
grew upon us during the war and which we do not seem 
to forget in times of peace. This paper has been one of the 
small band which has insisted, in and out of season, that 
there be a limit put to the reckless municipal, county. >tate 
and national expenditure. 

Now, however, the facts of the situation are beginning 
to dawn upon some of the leaders, who have not exercised 
the discretion which belongs to prudent and statesmanlike 
control. They have taken alarm and at a recent meeting 
in Maine have insisted upon the need of a nation-wide 
non-political organization to conduct a campaign of re- 
trenchment in these public expenditures. 

Needless to say. Brig. Gen. Herbert M. Lord, director 
of the budget, in his address before the seventeenth annual 
conference of state governors, was most positively for the 
retrenchment program. As he put it, "While public ex- 
penditures, taxations and indebtedness of small divisions 
of government in this country have been rising higher and 
higher," the federal government has begun to set an example 
of reduction in spending. 

On the other hand, some of the governors, notably the 
governor of New York, took a position antagonistic to that 
of the President, whose statement of retrenchment by the 
federal government has been very strongly accentuated. 
The governor of New York said: "The expenditures have 
been reduced because the war is at an end, and because 
it is no longer necessary to maintain the government "n a 
war basis." We find nothing to object to in that fact. In- 
deed, it would be better if every department of the local 
governments were to understand that the war reallv is over 
and that expenditures must come down. 



The United States Supreme Court 
Compulsory Education on June 1st settled once and for 
all the attempts of the extremists 
to impose further legisla'ion upon the citizens in the matter of 
compulsory education in the public schools. The legislature 
of the State of Oregon had passed a law that any person 
having the care and custody of a child between the ages 
of eight and sixteen must send the child to the public 
schools during the period that the schools are open. 

The opinion of the court in this matter is just received. 
It very clearly and comprehensively denies the right of 
the legislature to pass any such legislation. It is a direct 
interference with the rights of parents in many particulars. 
It conflicts with the rights of parents to send their children 
to schools where they will receive appropriate mental and 
religious training. Of course, that is just what the act 
intended, as it was aimed at the Catholic schools. It also 
clearly interfered with the right of schools and teachers 
therein to engage in a useful business or profession. In 
this respect it is obviously and completely repugnant to 
the Constitution. 

The interference with the property rights involved by 
this sort of legislation is unquestionably "arbitrary, un- 
reasonable and unlawful." 

As the court is careful to state, there is no question here 
of the right of the state to reasonably regulate all schools 
and to inspect and examine them to see if they are living 
up to the state requirements. As long as teachers and 
schools do that, there cannot be any real question of their 
right to exist and to teach as they will, provided they do 
not teach anything which is inimical to the public welfare 






July 11, 1925 



SAX FRANCISO > NEWS LETTER 



The court has stressed the property rights of both 
parents and teachers and they needed to be stressed, for 
according to the view of many, parents have no longer any 
rights. 



There is an idea slumbering 
Chinese Treaty Revision somewhere in the American 

mind that this Chinese question 
can be solved by some sort of treaty revision ; that the 
whole matter of the differences with the Chinese can be 
thus gotten rid of and the decks cleared for a proper de- 
velopment of commerce and the development of our civil- 
ization in the Orient. 

We are always making this sort of mistake. It comes 
out of our lack of experience of national and racial conflicts 
on any large scale. We seem possessed with the notion 
that where two men can talk a thing out, two peoples can 
do the same thing. But there is all the difference in the 
world between two men, as men, and as the exponents of 
racial cultures and historic growth. 

So we called a little conference and it broke up, forth- 
with. The Chinese would not play the game at all. They 
said that they refused to discuss the Shanghai incident, as 
an incident, and wanted to open up the whole question of 
the relations of the white peoples and governments with 
China. Our representatives having the notion to which we 
have made reference, were rather in favor of a determina- 
tion of the matters in dispute. 

Not so, the British delegates. They refused to discuss 
anything with China, until order was restored. Their argu- 
ment was to the effect that if China wanted to be recognized 
as a nation and to have the consideration which is accorded 
to a stable government, she would have to give proof 
of stability. Great Britain would not talk to a people that 
were running amuck into mob rows and threatening to kill ; 
striking and boycotting and making themselves a spectacle. 
It was a very British statement; you can almost hear the 
accent. 

In other words, it simply maintained the old doctrine 
of racial supremacy. Whether that can be maintained is 
the question. Only time will show. 

( )ur industrial supremacy i> not in the 
Foodstuff Exports least interfering with the old estab- 
lished position which we have won as 
an exporter of food commodities. (In the contrary; today 
the United States leads the world in the value of its fori ign 
trade in foodstuffs. Exports for 1924 were in advance of 
(hose for 1923 by about 15 per cent, while it appears already 
that 1925 will see us well over the billion mark. 

Tin- steady growth is pronounced by Department of Com- 
merce to be largely due to the larger shipment of cereals 
and fresh, canned and dried fruits, together with a larger 
export price. There is. according to the conclusions of the 
pamphlet, a gradual change in the trend of demand. The 

recognition of this and the development of our trade in 

accordance with it. make for the future securit) and devel- 
opment of the commercial side of our agricultural activity. 

Thus, in pre-war years, vegetable food products made up 
59 per cent of the total of the exported food stuff-, whereas 
in the post-war years these amounted to 68 per cent of the 
total. So that there has been an evident increase in 
export- over meat exports and animal fats and oils. Meat, 
one would think, would come second in the demand; riot 
so. however, meat only ranks third, and animal fats and <<^ 
second. 

The British market is our best market, worth $270,0 
in 1924, a long way ahead of other market-. The - 
next market was Canada, according to the report. Tins is 
merely technically so. for the food products i 
Canada are in process of re-exportation and are si nl again 
to Great Britain, which therefore become-, trai scendentally, 
the best customer. Germany come- next, then the Nether- 
Cuba, Italy. France and Mexico, in the order D 



Traffic Test for Ferries 

The recent out-pouring of people from the city into the 
country-side and back again, during the Fourth of July holi- 
day s. proved the splendid efficiency of traffic handling by 
the Golden Gate Ferry. Eleven thousand automobiles, with 
an average of four persons in each, were carried over the bay 
by this company in the three days, Friday, Saturday and 
Sunday, running on a fifteen minute schedule. 

The Northwestern Pacific took over more than 3000, 
while the Southern Pacific ferries to Oakland carried 2000. 
The Richmond ferry handled something more than 1000. 



"Dolling Up" for the Diamond Jubilee 

The "only Market Street in the World" as some one once 
called our main thoroughfare, is going to primp and oaint 
like a flapper for our great celebration, September 5 to 12th. 
This idea was launched recently at a meeting of lower 
Market Street merchants, Frank E. Carroll, presiding. Mr. 
Carroll stressed the importance of "dressing up San Fran- 
cisco" for this occasion as it has never been dressed before, 
and his audience pledged themselves to a scheme of inten- 
sive decoration unrivaled by anything since the days of the 
Exposition. 

Owners of buildings will clean and paint their possessions 
and have them in glistening condition for the great week, 
and plans for lighting, for draping and bunting have been 
consummated. The streets will teem with the gay colors of 
the Jubilee, — red, green and yellow, and part of the lighting 
scheme will include a Spanish Arch which promises to be- 
come as famous as the Tower of Jewels at the Pan-Amer- 
ican Fair. 



Piffling Prohibition 

1 lere are the opinions of clergymen and others regard- 
ing the fallacy of prohibition : 

In Wisconsin, Rabbi Samuel Hirshberg says: "It (pro- 
hibition! lias been the fruitful source of the most shame- 
ful corruption and hypocracy. It has brought law into dis- 
respect. It has notoriously failed in exterminating drunk- 
enness. It has been the immediate occasion for the drink 
habit in folk who otherwise would have known naught of 
it. It has fostered clandestine vice." 

In Massachussetts, an Episcopalian, the Rev. Ralph M. 
Harper, questions "the wisdom of moral reform through 
prohibition. The illogical thing that has been done is 
the wrong use that ha- been made of the law. Law is that 
which is inherent in the thing itself. Law is not made. 
It makes itself." 

\ Protestanl weekly, the Congregationalist, has ven- 
tured to publish an article against prohibition by the chair- 
man of the trustees of the Boston City Hospital. Dr. George 
i '.. Scar-, who -ays : 

" \t a time in our history when moral value- are. at a 
discount and the country need- the leadership and the sup- 
port of the church, its attitude is undermining its authority 
in spite of the few sane men within it who have spoken 
with courage and conviction, while its co-operation with 
the bootleggers ha- introduced an element of the ludicrous." 

Prohibition is declared by Assistant Secretary Andrews 
of the Treasure to have created a new class of criminals 
and to have developed an outlaw industry of greater mag- 
nitude than that with which any government has had to 
deal. He was addressing Trinity College students. 

"The Government recently took a daring, determined 
>tep in the matter of regulating community life." he said, 
"for the improvement of social and economic conditions 
of the whole community. It in effect wrote an eleventh 
commandment for the conduct of the individual: Thou 
-halt not drink, and made it a crime against the State 
to furni-h intoxicating beverages to those who have per- 
termination to drink them." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, r 




>LE/ISUI$'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

_ lorn Moore, 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



Curran 

"■VJO, No, Nanette." a musical play in three acts as -re- 

i->l sented by Edward D. Smith and H. H. Frazee at 
the Curran Theater last Monday evening is a great -,how. 
These gentlemen are to be congratulated in having given 
us a great treat, and in having demonstrated perfectly that 
the Coast can produce just as good, if not better, shows 
than the average run of so-called "road shows." It isn't any 
wonder that the capacity audience Monday evening, greeted 
them with such enthusiasm. Lillian Albertson directed the 
show, and it was as usual, perfect in every detail. 

Taylor Holmes has the leading part, — that of a success- 
ful printer of Bibles, with a penchant for helping adventur- 
ous females who happen in his way. He has an inimitable 
line of comedy, and he wins his audience from the moment 
he steps upon the stage. It is a matter for mutual con- 
gratulation that in his curtain speech, he told us he intends 
making his home out here. And Angie Norton ! What a 
comedienne ! Her song, "Oh, Doctor" brought down the 
house. Petite little Nancy Welford, sung and danced her 
way right into the hearts of her audience. Her work is 
delightful, and she is possessed of a charming personality 
that will carry her far. 

Willard Hall as the irrepressible Billy Early makes an 
excellent foil for Holmes. He and Marie Wells, as his 
wife, do some fine team work, as do also Gardiner Hart and 
Jean Nash. Dorothy Whitmore, Mia Marvin and Pauline 
French provide much fun as the three lady Adventuresses. 

There is a splendid chorus of men who can sing and 
dance, as well as a delightfully good looking bevy of girls, 
beautifully costumed. The opening number of the second 
act is one of the loveliest stage pictures imaginable, and a 
word must be said for the attractive and beautifully lighted 
stage sets. The music is of the lilty, catchy kind, and there 
are two big hits in the piece, — "I Want To Be Happy," and 
"Tea for Two." 

* * * 

California 

Next week the California is presenting "Kiss Me Again," 
Ernst Lubitsch's newest screen production, featuring Marie 
Prevost, Monte Blue, Clara Bow. Willard Louis, and John 
Roche. This picture, flavoring of Paris provides an excel- 
lent vehicle for these five players to run the gamut of love, 
ridicule, sarcasm, pathos, and humor. 



Imperial 

This theatre is still playing to capacity audiences daily, 
where is being shown that stupendous moving picture. 
"The Ten Commandments" with Theodore Roberts in the 
role of Moses. There is a fine musical score, and a splen- 
did supporting cast. 

* * * 

Granada 

At this theater this week will be seen Raymond Griffith 
with Betty Compson in a comedy special, "Paths to Para- 
dise." All the way from the Cliff House to Ensenada the 
funny adventure of a flourflusher and a clever crook girl are 
certain to provide much amusement. 



Wilkes 

With Carol Wines replacing Edith Ransom in the role 
of Tondeleyo, Leon Gordon's dynamic play "White Cargo" 
continues packing 'em in at the Wilkes Theater. 

There is a strong cast comprised of Richard Tucker, Carol 
Wines, Rex Cherryman, Frank Dawson, Olaf Hytten. Bar- 
ney Gilmore, David Munro, Norman Feusier, Knox Harri- 
son and William Bryant. 



Columbia 

"The Passing Show of 1921," the annual New York Win- 
ter Garden Revue — opened a bit late at the New Columbia, 
last Sunday evening. It is a whirling kaleidoscopic pan- 
orama of color, girls and beauty — but it is too bad that the 
Messrs. Shubert didn't send us something a bit new vhile 
they were at it! However, the theater was packed on the 
opening night and applauded the efforts of ( ieorgie Price 
and I.. Brendel to the echo. There are some splendid scenic 
effects, notably at the end of the second act, — the living 
chandelier — a beautiful effect with beautiful maidens act- 
ing as the supports, in a striking lighting production. 



President 

The amusement loving public is daily showing its satis- 
faction in Henry Duffy's beautiful theater on McAllister 
Street where "The Best People" goes into its fifth week 
tomorrow. Duffy has announced that the President and 
the Alcazar are to be kept on an absolute entertainment 
par. Certainly "The Best People" is a worthy attraction 
and is being staged with a clever and talented aggregation 
of players. Eveta Nudsen. .Marion Lord. Norman Hack- 
ett, David Herblin. Earl Lee, Florence Roberts, William 
Macauley. Robert Adams, Marion Sterly, Olive Cooper, 
John Mackenzie and Eugene Baranowski make up the big 
cast. 



Golden Gate Theater 

There is an unusually strong bill on at the Golden Gate 
this week. Headed by that popular songstress and maker 
of phonograph records. — .Marion Harris. She is a great 
"blue" singer, and will be assisted at the piano by Edwin 
Weber. 

Another strong feature of the bill this week is Ernest 
Evans and his company of beautiful girls in an elaborate 
song and dancing act called, "Ripples of 1925." Mr. Evans 
is comparatively a newcomer to the coast, but he has an 
unusually artistic and beautiful act and his offering is re- 
ceived with acclaim wherever he appears. 

Al Herman. "The Black Laugh," recognized as the fore- 
most blackfaced comedian of the day, is another str. ing 
feature on the bill. 

On the screen will be seen "Stop Flirting" a feature 
length Christie Comedy adapted from the musical play 
of the same name. John T. Murray. Wanda Hawley and 
■\ era Stedman are chief among the fun makers. 



July 11. 1925 

Amusements 



NKXT 


WEEK 




AZTEC 

Market nr Eighth 

EGYPTIAN 
Market at Jones 


Pictures 





ALEXANDRIA I 
Geary and 18th 


Pictures 


ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell nr. Powel 


I "Irene" 

( Henry DuffyPlayers 


CALIFORNIA 

4th and Market 


r 

; 


"Kiss Me Again" 


CAMEO 
936 Market St. 


F 


'A Woman's Faith" 

Alma Rubens 

and Percy Marmont 


CASTRO 

429 Castro 


I 


Pictures 


COLISEUM 
Clement and 9th 


\ 

r 


Pictures 


COLUMBIA 

Eddy and Mason 


} 


"Passing Show" 


CURRAN 

Geary, Nr. Mason 


)' 


'No, No, Nanette" 


GOLDEN GATEl 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor] 


Vaudeville 


GRANADA 
1066 Market St. 


} 


"Paths 
to Paradise" 


HAIGHT 
Haight at Cole 


I 


Pictures 


IMPERIAL 
1077 Market St. 


i 

r 


"The Ten 
Commandments" 


LUllW'S 
WARFIELD 
988 Market St. 


\ 


"A Slave 
of Fashion" 


MAJESTIC 
Mission Between 
20th and 21st 


I 
\ 


Pictures 


METROPOLITAN 

2055 Union St. 


\ 


Pictures 


NEW FILLMORE 

NEW MISSION 


\ 


Pictures 


ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell and Powel 


1 


Vaudeville 


PANTAGES 

Market at Mason 


} 


Vaudeville 


PORTOLA 
779 Market 


1 


Pictures 


PRESIDENT 

Market &. McAlliste 




The Best People" 


ROYAL 

1529 Polk 




Pictures 


Lull C.K 
Sutter and Steiner 


s 


Pictures 


UNION 
SOUARE 
O'Farrell nr. Powell 


\ 


Pictures 
and Vaudeville 


WILKES 

G"*'-v and Mason 


1 


"White Cargo" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Orpheum 

Beginning tomorrow the Orpheum 

has provided a hill just brimful of 
beauty, youth and talent. The head- 
liner is Adele Rowland, that charming 
star of the stage and screen, in a cycle 
of "Story Songs" of the variety she is 
most noted for. Another great favorite 
on the bill will mark the vaudeville de- 
but of our own native son, Charles 
Ruggles, who will appear with his own 
company in a brand new comedy, en- 
titled, "Wives, Etc.," written for him 
by Roy Briant. 

Roy Cummings, always a great fa- 
vorite, is also on the bill with a comedy 
offering called, "One Afternoon," in 
which he is ably assisted by charming 
Irene Shaw. There is also a real treat 
for the kiddies, — Pearl Hickman's Kid- 
dies, a bevy of youngsters in a new re- 
vue under the personal direction of 
Pearl Hickman. Maurice Diamond 
and his company will present a song 
and dance offering ; Ted and Al Wald- 
man, known as the world's greatest 
harmonica players have a novel turn 
called "Blu-O-Logy ;" Brent and his 
partner have an entertainment of flex- 
ibility, grace and art. 



WIGWAM 
Mission and 22nd 



Pictures and Revue 




ADVANTAGES 

OVERLOOKING BELMONT 
YACHT HARBOR AND 
LINCOLN PARK GOLF 
COURSES • • • 
ANEW NOTEL-700 ROOMS 
OPENED EARLY IN 1924 
ALREADY FAMOUS FOR 
ITS HOSPITABLE 
ATMOSPHERE ■ • ■ 
<• •:• ■> 

SUMMER RATES 
WRITE FOR BOOKLET 

G.E.Billinqslei) 





■ ■.taxes ia*» 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




Horse back riding 



Gallop across the open coun- 
try, or canter along mountain 
roads — fine mounts are avail- 
able at Feather River Inn. thp 
mountain resort of all out- 
door sports. 

Swimming-, fishing, tennis, 
golfing on a wonderful green. 
Dancing every night. Write 
for folder and rates to Walter 
Rounsevel. 



Feather River 




Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the Edge of the Berkeley Hills 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
jark between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



I 



818 Emerson St. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Flappers of Long Ago 

A -FLA ! Here's a morsel for meditation and gossip. 
Modern flappers are as old as time ; and flapperism is 
bared as ancient stuff, according to an authentic article 
which appeared not long ago in the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

That the fair sex, "flapped" in the early days of 1 867, 
much against the protests of their elders, has been chronolo- 
gically and collectively declared. 

A newspaper clipping signed by a "Girl of the Period of 
1867" let the cat out of the bag, "spilled the beans," as it 
were, and we now know that our great-great-great grand- 
mothers were duly criticised for being "vain, full of folly, 
and irresponsible." 

So there! How's that for a revelation? 

If the flapper of today were to take a leaf out of her great- 
great-great grandmother's "memory book" some of them at 
least might find terribly shocking things. For instance : 

It was not an uncommon thing for the ladies of long, long 
ago to keep late hours ; to dye their faces with coloring ; to 
indulge in elaborate toilettes, and to wear false hair. Ter- 
rible! But listen to what I found in an ancient newspaper 
clipping: 

"We who love late hours and pomps and vanities are like 
our grandmothers. Ladies who are without the blush of 
health substitute the blush of art and add a bit of jewelry 
to enhance their charms and thus deceive their lovers." 

I became so interested in these delicious foibles and 
frailties of great-great-great grand mothers that I went 
still further back in my search for feminine traits and an- 
cient-old flapperism. 

What did I find? Why something like this: 

Throughout the writings of Horace and Juvenal and 
in some of the writings dated as far back as 65-68 B. C. allu- 
sions of criticism are made to various perfumes used ex- 
travagantly in feminine adornment, and Terence, the an- 
cient writer, speaks in one of his scathing articles of women 
who "spent a year combing their hair." 

Petronius alludes to the dyed faces of charming debu- 
tantes and points the finger of scorn at their coquettish 
glances and the way they walked. He calls their style "in- 
cessus compositus" which, authorities tell me, meant what 
would now be called the Broadway walk, or at least the 
Broadway walk of their period. 

Seneca, the Roman philosopher, who wrote in the year 
A. D. 65, speaks sarcastically of fashionable women who 
spent two fortunes on one pair of ears. The same author 
criticised young ladies of "passing a day between a comh 
and a looking-glass." He also said that the smart set of 
his time were "more anxious about their headdress than 
they were about their virtue." 

Just imagine such a thing! 

The Roman satirical poet, Juvenal, in the years of his 
writings, A. D. 60 and A. D. 140, came in for some Having by 
other writers, also who, in their turn, followed him. For 
these other writers rising to the defense of voting ladies 
living in their time said this, if you please : 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

nr,o lluMh Street, Between Powell and Stockton. San Francliico 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



"The vanities of Israel and early Christendom, no doubt, 
continued in spite of the denunciations of prophets and 
fathers, just as the vices of Roman matrons survived the 
oitter invectives of Juvenal." 

Then the writer went on to say that the young misses' 
sins made good copy and excellent food for sermons since 
the beginning of time. But, joyfully comments the ancient 
old author in speaking of their writings, "all their vitupera- 
tions have not altered their merry course one iota." 

And to think that we, in this day and age, were inclined 
to listen to those who deign to criticise young girls of today. 
In reality, the modern young lady is but a lovely and charm- 
ing "will o' the wisp" to make merry our hearts and to 
cheer sordid old folks who forget the days of long, long .->go. 



Wedding of Elena Folger 
and Cyril McNear 

Society and all the fashionables from San Francisco. Bur- 
lingame and bay cities assembled last Thursday noon, Jul)' 
2, at St. Mary's Cathedral to witness the wedding cere- 
mony of Miss Elena Folger, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ern- 
est Folger of San Francisco, and Cyril McNear, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. McNear also of this city. Monsignor 
Charles Ramm officiated at the marriage. 

The bride, an exceptionally attractive young girl of the 
petite blond type, made a pretty picture in her graceful 
bridal gown of white chiffon. It was fashioned with the 
graceful bateau neckline and long tight-fitting sleeves. A 
court train finished the gown, which was elaborately em- 
broidered in seed pearls. The bridal veil was of tulle, also 
embroidered in pearls to match the gown, and was held in 
place across the forehead with a narrow bandeau of pearls. 

The bride's bouquet was made of white gardenias and 
lilies of the valley falling in a shower with tiny ribbon at- 
tachments. 

Ernest Folger gave his daughter into the keeping of her 
husband, and she was attended only by her sister, Mrs. 
Robert Miller. The matron of honor was in a pink chiflon 
frock, trimmed at neck and sleeves with ruchings of the 
same material, and with it she wore a small pink velvet 
hat. She carried a sheaf of flowers in various shades of 
pink. 

Mrs. Folger was in tan lace with a large brown tulle hat. 

William Wallace of Salt Lake was best man, and the 
ushers were Messis. Leon Brooks Walker, Carroll McNear, 
Tallant Tubbs, William Hillman, William A. Magee, Jr. and 
Kenneth Walsh. 

Mr. and Mrs. McNear will make their home in San Fran- 
cisci . The bride attended Sacred Heart Convent in Menlo 
Park, and since her debut has been an ardent worker in the 
Junior League. She has taken leading parts in several of 
the Junior League winter entertainments, and the Mardi 
(iras pageants. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 
1 ,...« 



July 11, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Flashes of 
notable for perfect diction 



Chamber of Commerce in Beautiful 
Sacramento City Give Banquet for Stars 

Sacramento society assembled at the lovely 
new Hotel Senator last Thursday night to pax- 
tribute to notables from Hollywood who were 
visiting their city during the filming of a new- 
picture, "The Pony Express." 

It was a gala event with state and city of- 
cials presiding and Sacramento's fairest daugh- 
ters in attendance at the sumptuous banquet 
given in honor of the celebrities, author, pro- 
ducer and screen stars. Mr. Harold McCurry, 
postmaster and president of the Sacramento 
Chamber of Commerce, opened banquet pro- 
cedures and then presented the toastmaster of 
the evening, Mr. George W. Peltier, president 
of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank, who 
took cha"ge of the noteworthy event. 

Mr. Peltier has the remarkable faculty of 
presiding with dignity and scholastic skill vet 
at the same time contributing a constant flow 
of wit and humor. He introduced the guests 
with appropriate encomiums, * always giving 
exactly the correct and complimentary tribute. 
humor punctuated his remark 
and understanding. 

Seated in the center of the long table adorned with flowers 
of rare coloring and the honor guests, Mr. Peltier first 
introduced the Honorable Albert Elkus, mayor of Sacra- 
mento, who extended the official "welcome" to the guests. 

Typical of the usual civic pride manifested by the ,>romi- 
nent citizens, Mr. Peltier called attention to the scenic 
beauties of northern California for motion picture purposes 
and with due consideration and careful delineation, Mr. Pel- 
tier reminded the distinguished assemblage of the mar- 
velous products in this part of the state. So well informed 
was the speaker and so splendidly did he stress the advan- 
tages of the Sacramento Valley and adjacent counties and 
environments that his address was a revelation to most of 
us who apparently had not fully realized the value of our com- 
mercial and scenic advantages. Sacramento is to be con- 
gratulated in having a citizen like Mr. George \V. Peltier, 
whose extensive knowledge of state and commonwealth 
affairs make him a distinguished figure in the world of 
big attainments and progressive affairs. 

Prominent guests at the Chamber of Commerce banquet 
given at the Hotel Senator, in compliment to the screen 
luminaries, included lames Crure, director of the Fai 
Players Lasky Corporation; Betty Compson, star in the pic- 
ture, "The Pony Express," jusl completed in the Cit^ oi 
Sacramento; Walter Woods, author of "The Ponj Express"; 
Wallace Beery, Ernest Torrence, Ricardo Cortez, Miss Du- 

pont, all prominent members of the cast, who will later be 
seen in the picture in \\ hich all Sacramento, especially, will 
be intensely interested. 

Honored guests at the banquet also included liar. '1.1 

Schwartz, assistant director to James Cruze; Karl Brown, 
lames Cruze's first camera man; Jeanne Cohen of New 
York, private secretary to the Jesse I.askv Company; Paul 

Wing, location expert; Percy Morris, location and construc- 
tion expert: Rachel Linden, scenario expert; Robert Don- 

tlldson, publicity man for the Cruze production; 1. ( I. Dill, 
master of properties, a great detail man. and United States 

Senator Samuel Shortridge, » ho gave an eloquent address 
All of the screen celebrities gave interesting talk-, at 

j SANTA MARIA INN 

i Swta Mama, Cuiforxia 




liOTlglj CAIMTI'lltllllltl 
73(1 Sutler street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 
250 Kooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per di 



On Ih* Cn««l Hithws* H«1I»«t R*lw*»n 5«. 
An Inn »t I naiatl Exr 



Fr»n«»co tnd I J, Aafalw, 



the banquet, paying high tribute to the co- 
operation received from the people of Sac- 
ramento in the making of their picture, and 
attributing much of the forthcoming success 
of the photoplay to the assistance offered by 
the city officials, the Sacramento Chamber of 
Commerce and the citizens of the city in the 
"heart of California." 

Dancing completed the perfect evening, 
over which Mr. George W. Peltier was the 
guilding genius of a most interesting and 
memorable event, bringing into prominence 
not only the people assembled there and creat- 
ing anew the camaraderie for which Sacra- 
mento is famed, but renewing one's estimation 
of California's great advantages and arousing 
one's loyalty to the Capital City of the State. 
* # # 

Demise of Celebrated Actress 
Well Known in Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Arnold, who make 
their home in Oakland, near the beautiful Lake 
Merritt, received the sad news on Friday, July 
3, of the demise of Mr. Arnold's cousin, the celebrated act- 
ress, Florine Arnold of New York. 

Florine Arnold, who visited this city a few years ago as a 
member of the theatrical company headed by Mrs. Fiske. 
was probably one of the best known stage celeb~ities in 
America. She has played leading character parts k. distin- 
guished companies, both in this country and in all parts of 
the world. She was a great favorite among the theatrical 
people as well as a celebrated stage star in the estimation 
of the theater-going people. During one of her most recent 
visits to this city, where she played in Mrs. Fiske's com- 
panv, Florine Arnold was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Harrv 
B. \rnold. 

Dearly loved for her merry nature and her great big heirt, 
as well as highly praised for her histrionic art, Florine 
Arnold had a hold upon the affections of all who knew her. 
She played the character parts assigned her as no one else 
seemed quite qualified to do, and was as original as she was 
skillful in her portrayals. 

She leaves a daughter well known in New York society, 
Mis 11. C. Spratley, a charming young matron of promi- 
nent family connections, and a son, who also makes his 
Imine in the eastern metropolis. 

Florine Arnold, the famous stage actress, will long be re- 
membered and her passing deeply mourned by a host of ad- 
mirers throughout America and in European theatrical cen- 
ters as well. 

* * * 

Writer Honor Guest 

l-'stelle Margaret Swearingen, well-known author of the 
fam. his st,,rv. "Pickaninny" was a special guest at the ban- 
quet given by the Sacramento Chamber of Commen 
Thursday night at the Hotel Senator. The prominent writer 
was seated as a guest at the table of which Mr. George W. 
Peltier was the host. Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Morris, of the 
Senator Theater were also guests at Mr. Peltier's tabic. 
which was beautifully decorated with garden flowers of 
radiant colorings. 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Wirt or uritr ft* 



i on vnur a«zt trip soaiA. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — Xew dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1925 



•swws" 



^sys* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



-^SayS* 



c/S*" 




V! 



When Vic Meets Vic 
r IC PALMER— a Standard Oil product of 
the "gusher" type — was out prospecting for 
some oil of joy in a sluggish golfing market. 
He spied Vic Klinker, hanker and equestrian, 
riding by on foaming steed. Vic, the oil mag- 
nate, knowing that Vic, the banker, had 1 mg 
since forsaken the greens and fairways for the 
bridle path and wooded dells, smiled in secret 
glee and communed with himself thusly: "He's off hh game 
and fit for the slaughter, and subsequent donation." What 
could be more fitting and apropos than to draw a draft on a 
banker who is supposed to be round-shouldered from carry- 
ing coin ? By much speech of an oily variety, and more coer- 
cion — Vic, the banker, accepted the challenge of Vic, the oil 
magnate, to a finish fight on the links — weapons to be con- 
fined to clubs. 

To make the match respectable and provide a suitable 
audience to act as witnesses and eliminate alibis — two other 
oil magnates were invited to make it a foresome. After 
five years of intermittent endeavor to decisively vanquish 
this exuberant golf orator, Vic, the banker, was about 
to reap his long-deferred dividend. Palmer lost the first 
nine, which subsequently decided the match. Adjustment 
was had and a new contest was arranged for the last nine. 
A three-hole carry-over was continued to the 18th, where 
each was on the green with a 3. Klinker sunk a 25-foot 
putt for a birdie four and Palmer dropped his with a long 
drive of 15 feet. The last nine was halved, but the game 
lost to Palmer. Klinker has gone back to his stirrups with 
a feeling of satisfaction, while Palmer avers that even the 
19th was a "dry hole." If there is a moral to this tale it 
should be: "Give a Banker a Horse he can Ride; give an 
Oil Magnate a Game he can Play, and ne'er the twain shall 
meet." * * * 

Whalen Wins . 

The Marin County Golf and Country Club has been host 
to Mutual Business Club golfers, and a new record was set 
for long distance driving. The Mutualities teed off at 
Sausalito and drove to San Rafael. Thereafter their drives 
were shorter and more numerous. 

Jack Whalen negotiated the course in the fewest number 
of strokes, thereby winning the tournament with a 68. He 
will have his name engraved on the Golden Gate Ferry 
Company's perpetual trophy — a four-gallon silver cup which 
is destined never to be filled with the liquid substance that 
cheers. Al Ferreira was runnerup with a net score 'if 72 
that netted him a merchandise order on the Palace Hotel, 
good for One Standard luncheon of Lamb and Peas. George 
Amies copped third prize — one round trip ticket. Sausalitd 
to San Francisco, via the ferry, or over the Golden Gate 
bridge to be erected in 1992. The guest's prize was de- 
livered to Ed Peterson, whose card showed a net 83. Some 
thirty other players "also ran" but their handicaps were 
not sufficient to win any prizes. Norman "Kid" Kidwell 
and Grandpa Charley Goodwin were paired in a foresome 
against George Amies and Commodore Speas. At the 
Fourth Hole the Commodore became marooned in a water 
■hazard and "Dry-Dock" Amies and "Nod-Skid" Kidwell 
had to tow him into the fairway. Rod Guyett, Chief 
Starter and Chairman of the day, engaged two caddies — 
one to find his ball — the other to replace turf. All three 
labored industriously throughout the aftern l. 

Andy Nelson and Al Ferreira. the latter, winner of the 
previous tournament, had wonderful cards. Each kept 



bis own score. Van Lyons tried out a pair of his new horn- 
rim magnifying glasses, which make a golf ball look like 
a cannon ball, and the holes appear as large as the Twin 
Peaks Tunnel. On the fairways he used a mashie, as the 
grass loomed up like Sutro's Forest. The canny Scot, Fred 
Small, was delayed in starting. It took some time to find the 
ball. When "Pants" Poheim, Roy Staniford, Bill Carson 
and Joe McMullen teed off, there was much confusion 
and discussion n\ei' bets. Bill Carson bet Roy Staniford 
an Edison Record that he could drive farther with his putter 
than Roy could with a brassie. "Pants" Poheim wagered 
McMullen a pair of golf breeches against a bolt of blue 
serge. At last reports, Carson had broken his record, but 
the serge was still on the shelf. 

A dinner at the Hotel San Rafael followed the golf battle 
of 18 holes, under the genial- supervision and personal direc- 
tion of Harry Annan. No one missed a "put" over the 
several "courses." 

Other ball hunters who joined in the day's hunt with 
varying success were Hal Ballentine, Courtenay Barter, 
Ralph Bybee, Howard Bernhard, Herb Bilsborough, Doc 
James C. Browne, Bill Carson, Tom Doherty, Jack Houston, 
Lincoln Johnson, Reginald Meller, Marshall Scobey, Frank 
Taylor, Louis Thynnes, George Williams, Jack Whalen. 
Harry Fowler, Herbert Holt, Al Ferrerra, Al Evers, Lee 
Bowman, Franklin McCormick, Norman (Kid) Kidwell. 
Ben Newsome, Jack Ellery, and Claude Alexander. 




ijntd 1*1 C0r0ttaJn0 

American Plan 

SUMMER RATES: 

$6.00 per day and up without bath 
$8.00 per day and up with bath 

Golf Tennis Motoring 

Aquaplaninc Swimming Boating 

Indoor attractions arc frequent, and there is dancing every night 
except Sunday to music by 

EARL FEGAN'S CASINO ORCHESTRA 

San Francisco Agent, W. H. Ramage, Oceanic Bldg., 2 Pine Street 
Phone Douglas 5600 

Mel S. Wright, Manager 

Glormiafcn Iparij, (Ealtforma 






July 11, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LET'i 



11 




THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 
Official welcome to more than 400 col- 
lege undergraduates and alumni from all 
parts of the state was extended hy his 
Honor, Mayor James Rolph, Jr., yesterday, 
Friday, July 10, at the Fairmont Hotel at 
the opening session of the seventy-eighth 
annual convention of the Theta Delta Chi 
fraternity. 

The Theta Delta Chi is one of the oldest 
college fraternities in America and held its 
last convention (which, by the way, was the first ever 
held on the Pacific Coast), 'in this city during the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition. 

The annual memorial services, which are an impressive 
part of the convention proceedings will take place on Sun- 
day morning in the historic chapel of the Leland Stanford, 
lunior. University, in Palo Alto. This service will mark 
the reunion of two retired ministers, who were classmates 
more than fifty years ago. They are the Rev. Adelbert S. 
Coates, D. O. of Vacaville, and Rev. Francis Henry Robin- 
son of Berkeley. They were members of the class of lis74 
at Hamilton College, New York. 

William F. Love, district attorney of Rochester, New 
York, national president of Theta Delta Chi, is presiding 
over the convention now being held in San Francisco. 
The local reception committee is headed by Mr. Frank H. 
Buck of this city, and formerly president of the fraternity. 

* * * 

T. T. Gregory, director of the city-wide appeal for San 
Francisco's share of the $5,000,000 endowment fund for 
American war orphans, announces that, although the cam- 
paign for funds docs not begin until Tuesday, July 14, con- 
tribution- have already hen entered at campaign head- 
quarters, 609 Market Street, 

Among the first to register their contributions and the 
amounts they subscribed were Joseph I. Tynan, $250; Har- 
old I,. Mack. $200; Louis Welch, $500; Joseph Beusmans, 
Annie Beusmans, Samuel M. Shortridge, Pro,, \. Kutner, 
Warren Olney, fr., W. P Dutton, \nue Tallant Brodie 
and Tallant Tubbs, $100 each. Other subscriptions are 
coming into headquarters each .lav with splendid rapidit) 
and in substantial sums. 

* * * 

"The optimism of the people of Santa Barbara i- or 

derful. They are not down-hearted a hit and do not 
in their efforts t i clean Up the city and start rebuilding.' 
said William Carl Hunt, manager of the Pacific 
branch of the National Red Cross, who returned to San 
Francisco alter a four-day inspection trip to Santa Bar- 
bara. 

"Accounts of the general damage has been much over- 
drawn. There is not a dearth of shelter or supplies. The 
Red Cross ha- furnished several hundred tents to people, 
and at least half of these were for people whose homes are 
considered unsafe for occupancy until repairs can be made, 
he said. "For those who suffered a total 1 
home-, the Red Cross is the 

Up to Salurd.n night less than 300 familii _:stered 

lor aid. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

A specially appointed fleet committee welcomed the 
midshipmen of the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, 
Maryland, at the ball which was given in their honor yes- 
terday, July 10th, at the Fairmont Hotel. 

James D. Phelan and Mrs. W. B. Hamilton were ap- 
pointed as host and hostess of the brilliant ball, for which several 
hundred invitations were issued. Among the hosts and 
hostesses chosen for the ball were, Admiral and Mrs. John 
H. Dayton and Generals and Mesdames Charles T. Meno- 
her and Wendell Neville and Captains and Mesdames Rob- 
ert Morris, Frank H. Ainsworth, Cyrus Cole, Charles Huff. 

Messrs. and Mesdames H. H. Yerrington, William B. 
Hamilton, Andrew Welch, H. Clay Miller, Jerd Sullivan, 
Edward G. Bowles, C. W. Durbrow, Lawrence Harris, Al- 
bert Jannopoulos, McClure Kelley, W. S. Leake, Charles 
McCormick, John Rosseter, Harry H. Scott, Van Allen 
Haven, Vernon Alvord, Charles Fay, John Rothschild, W. S. 
Berry. William Denman, J. Downey Harvey, Daniel C. 
Jackling, Arthur Flood, William Klink, Walter Martin, 
Edward Rainey, A. R. Rule, Harvey Toy, Fred Vincent. 

Doctors and Mesdames Alanson Weeks, D. E. F. Easton, 
T. Edward Bailly. 

Mesdames Mildred Pollock, Frederick Funston, Ashton 
Potter, George Landenberger and a number of others. 

* * * 

Newly appointed chairmen of departments of the State 
Federation of Women's Clubs will meet in conference be- 
ginning Saturday, July 11. at the Hotel Whitcomb at 9:30 
a. m. to discuss the programs of the various departments 
of the federation for the coming year. The chairmen hail 
from all parts of the state and they, with Dr. Mariana 
Bertola, president of the organization, will consider plans 
for federation activity in American citizenship, public 
health, international relations, applied education, American 
home work and other kindred subjects. The state pro- 
gram, it is understood, will follow closely the policy of the 
general federation. 

The sessions of the conference will last until Monday or 
until the state program has been completed for the coming 

\ ear. 

* * * 

( )rcclla Rexford, the color expert, who is giving a series 
of interesting lectures at the Fairmont Hotel, was the 
guest of honor at a luncheon given at the studio of Mrs. 
Emerson on California Street-, where a number of promi- 
nent writers and musicians, artists and architects gath- 
ered to pay tribute to the charming and brilliant young 

lecturer. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mr-. K. Percy Young of Santa Cruz, sailed on 
the Mongolia last Saturday for New York City by way of 
the Panama Canal. The Youngs will spend some time in 
the eastern metropolis and later spend a number of weeks 
in Washington. D. C. returning home by way of Denver. 

Miss Dorothy Ledyard. overseas Red Cross nurse and direc- 
tor of nursing for the American National Red Cross in seven 
\\ estern states and Alaska, hack in this city from Santa Bar- 
bara, is full of praise for the unidentified person who thought 
of parking Southern Pacific dining cars in the stationyard 
eed relief workers. 

(Continued on Page 13 1 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1925 




-/ picturesque spot on the Redwood Highway 
between Cwnmings and Eureka 



The little town of Cummings is the gateway to the great 
Redwood district on the northern coast of California. A 
score of pretty little brooks wind in and out of the can- 
yons in this district and flow into the Eel River. Between 
Cummings and Eureka there are thousands of acres of 
heavily timbered country comprising the principal red- 
wood forests of the world. Several of these groves of gi- 
gantic redwoods are now state domain and all of them af- 
ford accommodations for the motor camper as well as at- 
tractive districts for the lover of Nature. — Photo by the 
National Automobile Club News Bureau. 



July 11, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



THE BRAVE AND THE FAIR 

(Continued from page 11.) 

"There is always some cool head in every panic," Miss Led- 
yard said. "Some railroad official, bless his memory, thought 
of dispatching dining cars to Santa Barbara so that hot and 
healthy food might be dispensed to the hungry. That kind 
of forethought is the sort of thing that saves great situations." 

Miss Ledyard said that the hotel food served by the porters 
of the Southern Pacific diners were a "godsend" to men and 
women relief workers who labored twenty-four hours with- 
out a break in the ruins of Santa Barbara. The only other 
food obtainable was sandwiches and coffee at the Red Cross 
and volunteer canteens. 

The Los Angeles emergency police force of 200 men. Miss 
Ledyard said was so uniformly courteous in the exciting 
hours that "one might have thought they had been trained on 
the San Francisco force." 

* * * 

The first play of the summer session at Stanford Univer- 
sity will be given Friday night in Assembly Hall at the 
University when Hughes Hatcher's play of the Southern 
mountaineers. "Hell-Bent-fer-Heaven," will have its first 
performance on the Pacific Coast. This play took the 1923 
Pulitzer prize as the best play of its season. Rehearsals 
have been under the direction of Gordon Davis, who will 
also play the role of Rufus Pryer, a religious fanatic. 



Prof. — What are the habits of a wasp? 

Frosh. — Yerv bad. 1 assure you. — West Point Pointer. 



He — What size shoe do you wear? 

She — Well, seven is my size, but eights are so comfortable 
wear nines ! — Judge 



NEW VENTURE 

The ROYAL MAIL Steam Packet Company, pioneers 
in ocean travel, are again venturing off the beaten path by 
today announcing "4 in 1" cruise to the West Indies, South 
America, South Africa, and the Mediterranean bv the fam- 
ous S. S. ORCA, 25,000 tons displacement. 

The "ORCA" will sail from New York January 19th, 
1926, calling at : Trinidad, Rio de Janeiro, Santos, Monte- 
video, Buenos Aires, Capetown, Port Elizabeth, Durban 
(Natal), Delugoa Bay, Boira, Mozambique, Zanzibar, Moa- 
bassa, Port Sudan, Cairo, Alexandria, Naples, Monaco, Gib- 
raltar, Southampton, New York. 

The cruise lasts three months and the itenerary has been 
carefully outlined to bring the traveler to the countries vis- 
ited at the most delightful season in the year, — also pas- 
sengers may leave the "ORCA" on arrival at Naples, in 
April, and spend the summer in Europe, returning via any 
steamer of the ROYAL MAIL Line from Cherbourg or 
Southampton to New York. 

Shore excursions have been arranged at the principal 
ports of call and as it is the first cruise of its kind, it is 
expected the limit set for the number of passengers carried 
will be reached long before sailing date. 

The exceedingly low rate of $1,250.00 for the minimum 
accommodations, including shore excursions, will also be a 
great factor of early booking this wonderful cruise to 
capacity. 

A handsome illustrated booklet — describing the entire 
cruise — is now in course of preparation and will be mailed 
to any person interested in the cruise. 



"I [ave you any reason for marrying her?" 
"No, I have no reason, I'm in love." — Washington Cougar's 
Paw 



"Don't you know when you've bad enough to drink: 
"Sure, but by that lime I'm unconscious!" — Judge 



Bank President — But why do you wish to work in a bank' 
Serious Youth — I believe there's money in it. — Boston Tran- 
script 






At Nippon Mura 

Between Saratoga and l.n~ Gatos, 
nestled in the rolling foothills that stretch 
upward towards the forested heights ol 
the Santa Cruz Mountains, this unique 
resort was given its name because oi the 
similarity of the scenery surrounding it 
to certain districts of Japan, where the 
owner, Mrs. Theo. Morris, bad spent 
mam years. Aside from its title, and a 
somewhat Japonesque architecture. 

"Nippon Mura" is essentially high- 
class American in its cuisine and its va- 
rious comforts and conveniences. 

It is immaculately clean; its beds are 
made up with snowy linen sheets; there 
is a home-like atmosphere about it that 
few resorts, which we have visited, can 
boast; and above all. cream, real, thick, 
fresh cream is always on the table, in a 
generous sized pitcher, and fresh vege- 
tables and eggs are served the guests. 
grown" chickens and the 
very best oi meats. It is a place to rest, 
day dream, take interesting walks, play 
croquet, and above all. experience the 
wonderful sleep at night, that generally 
comes to us only in childhood. 



PACIFIC GAS and ELECTRIC CO. 

A California enterprise with a national reputation. Owned by 32,000 stockholders 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 
Common Stock Dividend No. 38 

cA regular quarterly dividend of S"2.00 per share upon the common capital 
stock of this company will be paid on July 15, 1925, to shareholders of 
record at the close of business June 30, 1925. 

EARNINGS STATEMENT 12 MONTHS TO MAY 31ST: 

1925 1924 Increase 

Gross Operating Revenue . ... S46.067.918 S41.335.730 54,732,18 8 

Net Income S17,675,672 S16,462;837 SI. 212.835 

Bond Interest and Discount... 7,021,961 6,598,375 423,586 

Balance $10,653,711 S 9.864,462 S 789,249 

Reserve for Depreciation __3 Z 313,526 3,151,902 161.624 

Surplus $ 7,340485 S 6,712,560 $ 627,625 

ACCRUED DIVIDENDS FOR 12 MONTHS: 

On Preferred Stock (6 1 $ 3,261,922 $ 3,214,425 S 47,497 

On Common Stock (8 ) J493.920 2,848,559 445,36 1 

Balance $ 784,343 $ 649,576 $ 134,767 

The Company during 1924 expended upwards of$}0,000,000 in the construction of 
additional facilities to be placed in the terrier of its hundred* of thousands of cus- 
tomer;, materially aiding California's industrial, commercial and tociat development. 

Listed on New York, San Francisco and other Stock Exchanges 

A. F. HOCKENBEAMER 

San Francises. California Vice-President and Treasurer 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tulv 11. 1925 




AMONG the activities which Los Angeles so clever.y j 
plays up and which bring her fame and fortune we 
must note the Pan-American Exhibition of Oil Paintings 
to be held at the Los Angeles Museum of History, Science 
and Art, from November 3rd to the end of the year 1 his 
includes all portions of American territory. North and 
South, and will be unique. 

* * * 

James S. Alexander, Chairman of the Board. National 
Bank of Commerce, New York, says that there are three 
developments of outstanding importance in American bank- 
ing since the war. He expresses them as follows: Ihe 
putting into operation of our Federal Reserve System the 
change in our gold holdings, and the reversal of the debtor 
relation of America with the rest of the world. There is 
no doubt that the banking position of this country has been 
enormously strengthened, and this fact has in itself revolu- 
tionized our relations with the rest of the world. 

* * * 

The Board of Trade of San Francisco has just published 
its forty-eighth report. This organization has reached al- 
most its fiftieth anniversary, and has been an institution 
of the greatest possible value to the community. It started 
with five members and now has 50 employes and 18 ad- 
justers, working for a membership of nearly 400. 

* * * 

Plans are being made for the second annual Pacific 
Radio Exposition, conducted by the Pacific Radio Trade 
Association to be held at the Civic Auditorium from August 
22 to 28 inclusive. This exposition has been established as 
a buying mart for the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast 

States. 

* * * 

There are over five thousand manufacturers in Northern 
California, the majority of whom are in the Bay district. 
We are getting to be an industrial center and one way of 
having this fact impressed, is to visit the California In lus- 
tries Exposition. The Exposition exhibitors in 1924 reached 
340,000 actual buyers. The California Industries Exposi- 
tion thus becomes one of our most important institution-. 

* * * 

Government ownership of vessels meets with the greatest 
disapproval from those who have had experience. The 
president of the United States Fleet Corporation, Admiral L. 
C. Palmer, goes on record as distinctly against it. Private 
ownership will require, however, some initial government 
aid in order to enable successful competition. 

* * * 

The president of the San Francisco Chamber of C m- 
merce, Mr. Clay Miller, says: "San Francisco is the un- 
disputed financial center of the Western United States and 
is rapidly taking its place among the great financial centers 

of the world The bank clearings of San Francisco 

in 1924 amounted to approximately eight and one-half bil- 
lion dollars." 

It may come as a surprise to most of our readers, but 
we have as authority the president of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce that the value of the water-borne 
tonnage of San Francisco Bay is greater than the aggregate 
value of all Pacific Coast ports combined. 

* * * 

J. F. Jarrell. manager of the agricultural department of 
the Santa Fe, considers the crop situation as favorable in 
the country tapped by the Santa Fe, in spite of many dis- 
couraging circumstances. Conditions in California are the 
best of any section served by the Santa Fe, says this expert. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS' COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 18G8. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fu id 479,081.25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-1'RESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7tli Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J£) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Pnld Up Cnpllnl (20.000.000 (20,000.000 Itmierve l-iinU 

All Kinds ul COMMERCIAL RAMvlXO Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE UuutrhL, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES OVEU BOO BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and al LONDON, I5NG.; MOW VORK: 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

Sail Fruilfixeo Oilier: l.-.u I 1IIIIHIMA STUI'.KT 
inn t i: HE ATIM "TIC \\. .1. Oil I Til AICII 

llunajrer AnnI. MnitltKt'r 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
WALTER W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 22+4 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. 

^Innufnt'ttirerM of 

uiVRTRn «tf,f.i, impk, tanks, cv 

PR\«TOrKS. r.ASHOI.DRRS. SMOK 
Snn FrnnHfucn. Cnllf. 
414 Mnrkrt «*«. 


of California 

I-VKItTS. Fltl'MF.S. 
R STICKS. F.TC. 

I,«m An eel en. Cnllf. 
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W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC — INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building fOppositp Palarp Hntplt San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



11. 1925 



SAX FRANCISO i NEWS LETTER 



15 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

( )nc of the largest and most enjoyable parties given last 
weekend was a supper dance at Uplands, the home of Mr. 
and Ms. Charles Templeton Crocker, in San Mateo. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crocker entertained eighty of their friends. 
Tallies were placed on the terrace, and during- the dancing 
a display of brilliant fireworks amused the guests. Some 
of the participants in the affair were : 

Messrs. and Mesdames William S. Kuhn, Fentress Hill, 
Robert Hays Smith. Gerald Rathbone, Mountford Wilson, 
Rudolph Spreckels, Stewart Lowery, George Leib, Harry 
Poett, William Parrott, Laurance I. Scott, Alexander Ham- 
i'ton, William Van Antwerp, Walter Martin, Daniel C. 
Jatkling, Alan Lowery, William W. Crocker, Raymond 
Welch, Kenneth Walsh, Harry Horsier Scott. 

Mesdames Cheever Cowdin, Fullam Sands, Jennie 
Crocker Whitman. 

Misses Marian Zeile, Mary Martin, Eleanor Martin, Kath- 
arine Kuhn, Claudine Spreckels, Frances Ames, Evelyn 
Poett. Helen Garritt, Helen Crocker. 

Messrs Richard Schwerin, Roy Pike, William Leib, Wil- 
liam S. Tevis, Jr., Cordon Johnson, Douglas Alexander, Au- 
gustus Taylor, Jr. 

The following' guests registered at Feather River Inn dur- 
ing the past week : 

July 2nd — A. P. Andrews and Lorraine Andrews. San Fran- 
cisco; Mr. an 1 Mrs. F. .\. Kales, Franklin A. Kale^, Jr., Ala- 
me 'a. California; Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Burpee, Piedmont, Cali- 
fornia; Mr. an 1 Mrs. lingo kamaciotti. Misses Constance and 
Ca'herine Kamaciotti. San Francisco; f. D. < *sbome and Fam- 
ily, San Francisco; T. ('. Tilden, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew G. McCarthy, San Francisco. 

Friday, My 3rd, 1925— Mr. and Mrs. 11. E. Hoffman, Hono- 
lulu, T. H.; Mr. and Mrs. William Dodge. Berkeley; Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward T. Ford, Ed-ward T. Jr. and Lawrence C, 
San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Henry < .. W. Dinkelspiel, San 
Francisco; Sam I. Schwabacher, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. 
L. Feigenbaum, San Francisco; Joseph Magnin, San I ■ in 
ci9co; Miss Carol Brownstone, San Francisco; Martin and 
John Walter Dinkelspiel, San Francisco; F. P. Basler, B. M. 
Basler an I MPs Basler, Sacramento; Mr. ami Mrs. George 

R. Gay, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. M. \\ . Sahlberg, Sac- 
ramento; Mr. and Mrs. Herbert K. Baker, Betsj Ro9s Baker 

an 1 Robert P. Baker, Sacramento; Mr. and Mrs. Gi 

I lu 'nut, Marcta Gay Hudnutl an I George D. Hudnutt, Jr.. 

Sacramento; Mr. and Mrs. A. R, McNeill, Jr.. San Fran 

Mr. and Mrs. \. S. I'.rou nice. Marysville; Mr. and Mis. \. 

I .auritzer, Marys\ die. 

Saturday, July 4th. 1925— Mr. Philip J. Danke and R. W. 
Crook, San Francisco; S, < >. Bi wl i yril Magnin, San 

Francisco; I eo M, Friend, New York Cit) ; Mr. P. I.. VVyche 
and wife and Mr. and Mrs. P. \ an P.uien. Berkeley, California. 

Sunday, July 5th, 1925 -Mr. and Mrs. 1. P. Crawford, Los 
Angeles; Mr, an I Mrs. John S. Staats, San Francisco; Mrs. 
B. M. Stich, San Francisco; V S. Lesser and wife, ' lal 
K. E. TremoureUX and wife and Noble Hamilton an 1 wife. 
San Francisco; Martin O'Brien and wife. San Francisco; Miss 
Florence P. Harper, San Francisco; Mrs. Bertha Coo] 
11 isco, 

Monday. July 6th, PL's — Mr. I. P.. Keating and wife, and 
lack. Jr.. Piedmont; Miss Margaret Dougherty, San 



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One mile north of Cloverdale, along the route of the Redwood High- 
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for many years for its splendid table and home-like atmosphere and 
Southern hospitality. 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
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Telephone 110 



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Atk for Iltutlraled Book 

Norway Cruises From England 

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San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club. 

ROBERT Louis Stevenson suggested 
an attitude of mind for the modern 
tourist which is the key to the enjoyment 
of motoring and which makes familiar 
scenes the more interesting and every 
highway an attractive volume of absorb- 
ing lore. 

"He who is indeed of the brother- 
hood," wrote Stevenson, "does not voy- 
age in search of the picturesque, but of 
certain jolly humors." These humors of 
Stevenson represent an attitude of mind. 
It is a thought which might have been 
credited to a follower of Buddha. It sug- 
gests the close relationship of mortality 
to the infinite. It is the same thought 
which lies behind the often quoted lines 
of Shakespeare — "Sermons in stones, 
books in the running brook," and it leads 
to an appreciation of the backgrounds of 
life which may be attained in no other 
way. 

The great difficulty with the average 
tourist is that he closes his eyes and 
mind to the beauties of Nature which are 
often close at hand. He does not. like 
Thoreau, create a world about him by 
exercising his powers of observation. 
Communion with Nature is one of the 
most potent means of stimulating the im-> 
agination and of developing a sense of 
the fitness of things and the power to 
visualize matters with a sane perspective. 



The motorist who will try out this pre- 
scription and search for new beauties in 
places near at hand, will discover that he 
is improving his powers of observation 
and deriving a far greater interest from 
the use of his motor car. 
* * * 

Speed Doesn't Pay 

Have you ever considered the mathe- 
matics of safety? 

The legal limit of speed in California 
on the open highway is thirty-five miles 
an hour. In a trip of 175 miles the mo- 
torist who can maintain an average of 
thirty-five miles an hour will reach his 
destination in five hours. On the other 
hand, the man who maintains an aver- 
age of forty-five miles an hour, or ten 
miles in excess of the legal limit, will 
reach his destination in about four 
hours, but the strain of driving at the 
faster pace is more than twice that of- 
fered to the man who stays within the 
legal limit. 

Likewise, the strain on the motor car is 
increased a hundredfold while the ele- 
ment of time registers only a saving of 
twenty percent. Every mile added to 
your speed in excess of thirty-five miles 
an hour increases the strain on driver 
and car not by the percentage of increase 
maintained in the first thirty-five miles, 
but in geometrical progression for every 
ten-mile increase. In other words, the 
strain at forty miles an hour is twice that 
of thirty, the strain at fifty miles an hour 
is twice that at forty, and the strain at 
sixty miles an hour is twice that of 
fifty. 

The hazard of accident increases in the 
same scale so that the man who proceeds 
at an average speed of sixty miles an 
hour has eight times the chance of ac- 
cident as the man proceeding at thirty 
miles an hour. Excess speed with a 
motor car is hardly worth while. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 



Attention Club Members! 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. No. 41,989. 
Dept. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
John Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court of the 
State Of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within four (4i 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice to the said administrator, at his office, 
858 Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
ornia, which said last-named office the under- 
signed selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of John 
Oliver, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, July 7, 
1925. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY. 
Attorneys for Administrator. 




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July 11. 1925 



SAX FRANCISO i NEWS LETTER 



Mr. Blabbitt on Short Skirts 



THE title of this column is a misnomer, for women do 
not wear skirts nowadays. However, since short skirts 
would, theoretically, cover the subjects concerned, I will 
let the heading stand. After all, "skirt" sounds better than 
"kilt." The latter might be confusing as well as shocking. 
Kilts are worn by Scotchmen and the Scotch aren't given 
to spending money, while American women are. That's 
the first explanation of my preference. In the jungles of 
Tennessee, where monkeys play the live-long day, "kilt" 
has another usage, somewhat beside the point, but interest- 
ing, nevertheless. For instance, mountaineers living within 
the scope of the great commonwealth men ioned, are wont 
to say, "Maria, I just come from back in them thar hills, 
where I and Hank has got our still an' I calkerlate I kilt 
a revenooer." This is conclusive proof that "kilt" cannot 
be substituted for short skirt, it's too extreme — nothing 
could be shorter than a revenue agent's life in the Tennessee 
mountains. 

So much for the title. Now for the subject. Any woman 
will do, for "you just know she wears them." Short skirts 
are a blessing in some cases and an evil in others. In any 
event, they create a state of affairs exceptionally hard on 
masculine eyes, of inestimable benefit to oculists. Short 
skirts leave the business of street sweeping to professionals. 
A few years ago, long skirts threatened to wrest the white- 
wings' livelihood from their very brooms and shovels. The 
only industry that abbreviated skirts harm now is that of 
textile manufacturers. A yard of cloth will now make a 
shockingly adequate dress for miss or matron, whereas it 
used to be that ten yards would barely suffice for a bodice 
or a pair of sleeves. 

It is not a spirit of economy on the part of our women 
that has brought about the present skimpiness but. rather. 
one of obligingness. When hems bung lower, editors 
reformers and other near-sighted individuals set up a 
continual outcry against rolled stockings. Women tired 
of hearing denunciations and wisely resolved to capitulate 
Short skirts came, as a result, bringing with them a need 
fur rolling them higher. Rumor has it that s : lk -tucking 
dealers engineered this change anil of their success there 
can be no doubt. 

Short dresses have not brought about short prices lor 
women's garments. You can ge\ some very nice ma: 
for thirty or forty dollars and a dressmaker's services tor 
a like amount. When the garment i- Finished, you can sew 
in the label of some exclusive couturier, wear it (the dre--, 
not the label) two or three times and then donate it as a 
golfing course for moths — enabling them to pass the time 
pleasantly until woolen goods are decamphorized. 

An already assembled dress will set you back about the 
same amount as would the custom built, in season. F. O. 
B., at any Parisian modiste'- Bronx factory. ( hit of s< 
the same creation can be purchased in any basement for 
three ninety-eight — no alteration or return. 

Women's clothes are like automobile-. An unusual mi del 
stain's by itself for very few days, at the end of which 
time several thousand arc rushed on the market — alike in 

ever) detail, except quality. So. with society women 

with each other in the shortness and transparency •<( their 
drc-ses, it will only be a question of hours before 
Woman ami girl will be outfitted in what use 1 to be the 
latest Style, This seems to be the case todaj 
no longer things of which fleeting glimpses n d at 

streetcar -top- and windy corners. They ire in evidence 
everywhere. It'- getting so that men are beginning to look 
at faces, more and more. 



Something must be left to the masculine imagination, 
which, every woman will admit, is remarkable. <)l course, 
some members of the weaker sex would just as soon leave- 
certain things to the imagination. These wise souls are 
in the same class as timid men who scorn, with good reason, 
knickerbockers and bathing suits. Perhaps it',- an excellent 
thing. 

\\ hat will we see next? 

What is there left to see? 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 



Alcazar 

"Irene," the first musical comedy so far presented by the 
Henry Duffy Players at the Alcazar, has proved one of 
the most notable attractions of the season and is to be re- 
tained for a sixth week, starting tomorrow night. This pro- 
duction is the last word in completeness and attention to 
detail. There is a sprightly chorus of talented girls and 
boys, and most of the principals have been playing "I.ene" 
ever since it was originally in New York. 
* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

San Francisco is rapidly becoming the center of things 
in a movie way — the movie people are planning now to 
make a first showing of their attractions, as San Francisco's 
reception of them is certain to be a discerning and unbiased 
one. This week is the world premier of Norma Shearer 
and Lew Cody in "A Slave of Fashion." It is an unusual 
story of the present day — full of suspense and thrills, and 
lavish with luxury. The scene is laid in New York City, 
with a girl from a little Middle Western town suddenly 
thrust upon the ultra smart section of the sparkling me- 
tropolis. Samuel Shipman wrote this very convincing story 
for the screen, and llobart Henley directed it. 

The many admirers of George Lipschultz will be glad 
to welcome him back after a short absence in Sacramento. 
He and his Music Masters will delight with an especially 
interesting program. Fanchon and Marco have another 
of their famous "Ideas" to offer, making a well rounded 
evening's entertainment. 



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Opp"sit,' Palace Hotel 
II* VIC HUH c»!'.s \\ A-lll l> AMI GHKASIKII 

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PHONE DOUGLAS 243 
Mil II. mi-* for Srrrlce and Slornsre of SutnmnhllrH 



18 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1925 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry)" 



PHONES: 
San Francisco— BarUneame 

West, 703 478 



Dividend Notices 



NOTICE OP TRUSTEES' SALE I XDEIt 
>UUl DEED OF TRUST 



j =Vr,' rrsnriwo State of California, did 
&££ a F ce;»ee?o, trust bearing date 
the Uth day of July, 1924. to cits iiue i 
surance Company, a corporaUon. "trustee 
for the benefit and security of Alvah M. Jonn 
son. which deed of trust was recorded in the 
office of the County Recorder of the City 
and County of San Francisco, State ofCali- 
fornia on the 19th day of July, 19-4, in 
Liber 912 of Official Records of Deeds, at 

Pa wHE RE\s a the said Alvah M. Johnson 
thereafter sold, assigned and transferred 
unto Catherine M. Johnson all of .his right 
title and interest as beneficiary in and to 
the said note and deed of trust, in and by 
1 ceriain assignment recorded on November 
Ith 1924 in Liber 949 of Official Records at 
page 406. in the City and County of San 
Francisco State of California; and 

WHEREAS, default has been made by the 
said Stephen H. Risdon and Amy Risdon, his 
wife in the payment of the promissory note 

Se ^^ P ^\ S , ai t hfs\ a id cl r trerin a e n M. Johnson 
has landed that said trustee. City Title 
insuraoce Company, a corporation, should 
fSrfhwith proceed to sell a part of the real 
propertv described in said deed of trust, to 
satisfy "said indebtedness; and ... 

WHEREAS, the first parcel of real estate 
described in said deed of trust has been 
heretofore released to said Stephen H. Kis- 
don and Amy Risdon. his wife: 

NOW THEREFORE, in accordance will 
the terms and under the authority of said 
deed of trust, the said City Title Insurance 
Company, a corporation, as such trustee, does 
hereby give notice that on Saturday the Uth 
dav of Julv. 1925. at the hour of 11 o'clock 
am of said day. at the office of the City 
Title' Insurance Company, a corporation, at 
»16 Montgomery Street. San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia it will sell at public auction to i 
highest bidder, for current lawful money of 
th! United States of America, that part of 
the real estate described in said deed of 
trust hereinafter described in order to sat- 
isfy and pay the amount due and unpaid 
on' the aforesaid promissory note, together 
with the expenses of sale necessarily in- 
curred and together with all further sums 
which have or which may hereafter becomi 
due said Catherine M. Johnson, pursuant to 
the terms of said deed of trust. 

That the said real property, with the im- 
provements thereon, described in said deed 
of trust and to be sold as above indicated 
is situate, lying and being in the City and 
Countv of San Francisco, Suit, of ' alifo 
and more particularly described as follows. 

Commencing at a point on the easterly 
line of Thirty-eighth Avenue dis'nnl 
thereon one hundred and fifty (150) 
feet southerly from the point formed by 
the intersection of the easterly line of 
Thirty-eighth Avenue with the souther- 
ly line of Lincoln Way. and running 
thence southerly along the said easterly 
line of Thirty-eighth Avenue twenty-five 
(25) feet, thence at a right angle east- 
erly one hundred and twenty feet (120), 
thence at a right angle northerly twenty 
five (25) feet, and thence at a right angle 
westerly one hundred and twenty (1201 
feet to the easterly line "f Thirty-eighth 
Avenue and the point of commencement. 
Being a portion of Outside Land Block 
number fisn. 
CITY TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
H. W. DIMONLi. 

President. 
BERT D. PAOLTNELLT, 
(Seal) Sec-etary. 

Trustee. 
Dated: June lfith. 1925. 
GI.EVsnR. CLEWE AND VAN DINE. 
Attorneys for Catherine M. Johnson. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

526 California St. (and Branches), 
San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending June 30th, 192."). 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
foDr and one-quarter <4Vt ) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, payable on and after 
July 1st, 1925. Dividends not called for are 
added to the deposit account and earn in- 
terest from July 1st, 1925. Deposits made on 
or before July 11th, 1925, will earn interest 
from Julv 1st, 1925. 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 



BANK OF ITALY 

Head Office and San Francisco 
Branches 



For the half year ending June 30, 1925, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rati, of four c -I > 
per cent per annum on all saving's deposits, 
payable on and after July 1, 1925. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same 
rate of interest as the principal from July 1. 
1925. Savings deposits made on the first busi- 
ness day of any month Cor on or before the 
tenth day of January. April, .July and Oc- 
tober) will earn interest from the Hrsl o1 
that month: deposits made after said date 
will earn interest from the first of the fol- 
lowing month. 

JAMES A. BACIGALUFI, President. 



ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK 

P. E. Corner Montgomery and 

Sacramento Streets, 

North Beach Branch, 

Corner Columbus Avenue and Broadway. 

Columbus Branch, 

Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets. 



For the half year ending June Mm, 1925, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
and one-quarter ) -I ' , t per cent per annum on 
all savings deposits, payable on and after 
July 1. 1925. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same 
rate of interest from July 1. 1925. ]'.-■[.. <s i i s 
made on or before July in, in 2 5, will earn 
interest from July 1. 19 

A. K. SBARBOHO. President. 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY 

Main office. 

''■tiio i- Market, McAllister and Jones Streets, 

Mission ■ ifflce, 

Corner Valencia ami L'L'nd Streets. 



For the half year ending June 80, 1925, a divi- 
dend has i.e. n declared at the rate of four <4i 
pi i cent per annum on all deposits, payable 

nn and after July 1, 1925. Dividends not 

drawn wiit !•«• added to d< posil i s' accounts, 
become a part thereof, and will earn divi- 
dends from ruly I. 1 925 I >eposits made on 
or before .luiv 10, 1925, will earn interest from 
July 1. l 926 

E. ,i. ti IBIN, President, 



HUMBOLDT BANK 

7> 3 Market Street, near Fourth. 

Bush -Mom gomt ry Branch, Mills Bldg. 



For the half year ending June 30, 1925, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four <-i, 
per cent per annum on savings deposits pay- 
able on and after July 1, 1925. Divid 'nd 
not called for bear interest f-om July l. 19?5. 
Money deposited on or before July in. 1925, 
will earn interest from July 1, 1925. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL., Cashier. 




-the better it gob- 




GEO. \V. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cupx were nerved at the Pan- 
ama Pnelflo International Exposition 



Xn i n;.:::pi 



SUMMONS 



in the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 

of California in and for the City and 

County of san Francisco, ami the complaint 

Bled in tin- office oi the County Clerk of said 

< 'ily and County. 

Frederick Marriott, Plaintiff, vs. X. F. Wil- 
son. 1 >efendant. 

The People of the State of California semi 

greeting to: x. F. Wilson, Defendant. 

Von are hereby directed to appear and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 

above, brought against yon in the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City ami County of San Francisco, within 

ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and I'nunlv: 

or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 

appeal and answer as above required, th« aid 

Plaintiff will take judgment for any money 

or damages demanded in the complafnl as 
arising upon contract or will appfj to the 

Court for any other relief demanded in the 

complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the Su- 
perior Conn at the City and Countv oi San 
Francisco, state of California. 
Mated April 30, 1924. 

Seal] II. I. WULCREVY, Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAGNETT) '.. 

Deputy clerk. 
AUSTIN LEWIS. Attorney for Plaintiff, 173 
Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 



Phone Sitteti 3JTR 




Wm. Herbst & Company 

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Grays tone 

3100 3101 31(12 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 

DINfSEF^AW 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 






134 Sutter St. 



Douglas 71 IS 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think thut a i It-oraiu hruNkins once or twice a Uiiy Ix 
taking very (rood care of them. UruMliliig 1m only n part of the 
| liroeeMM. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
| competent dentist eau take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
I ihey may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
* trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
I 1'here are gum troubles th»* will destroy teeth faster than 
I decay. Are your teeth soref Do your gums bleed; Call la today 
I nud talk it over. It will cost nothiag. My nerve blocking sys- 
| lem blocks off nil nerves and pain. It will please you. 

i DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 



| "THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

j 908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif 

I Phone Garfield 335 

J SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges; 

I Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



£Ceanoi\5 



14". Powell St.. 

San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



L 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50— Also a la Carte 
.Mr cliant'9 lunch M a. m. to 2 p, m (a la carte). Private <ii 
miis for banquets and parties, seating 76 to L0Q peop] 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



BLANC O'S 



llfoil t I I SHU |i 

IT. U «. I, It!.* 

it. s.ni<ht> - s.mi Itwtliln.. n 



n i he finest cafe In Arm 
ii. in.) 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

oreakfasts 35c 50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c i 

A la carte orders at all times 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPICRJOR 



»■» — ---- ■ ■ ■ ■ ' •-——.... ..................4 



I'll lllltl l-.-tikin Mreets I'l e Krilnktln II J 

Nil visum should leave the oily without dining | 



7a. ; 

W.TS 



i NOAH'S 
ARK 

I ':! Third V\<>nm\ S \ "\ M \ I 'BO 



Rpnturfng Southern Cooking 
From 

[tO p. m. 
p. m. 
ii Holidays 
■ 
n.osisn ei cm hum) \^ 

rialf m..rk from llltrhwny 




I Mil lmi's CuiM 

14. M if Hot t 



RESTAURANT 

OPEN IM \. Mi TO ll-M P. M. 

1 n surpassed i i isinb 
Cau. Lkowhardt 

formerly nf 
G*M«n Gate Park Casta* 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the I 

Direction of the Sisters or St. Dominic l 

A WARNING! | 

in, headache, dieziness, nausea, nervousness, cai- J 

table vision. Boating apols, poor memory, ~stig- t 

cross eyee, styes, disr!iarr;i.:s cr watery eyes, J 

leu or crusty eyelids, itoli> or i iflnnrd eyes, Fa-sisbt- J 

in nearsightedness, or if one Bye is weaker than the other J 

these symptoms should receive immediate earn and atlcn- J 

W- advise thai you consult 




.10 Years Ex. 



George Mayerle, Optometrist 

• Optical Practice Market St 



Francis en 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SllOr' 

No. 2 Till man n Place, at 2-11 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 
Rare Books — First Editions— Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc.. of I d 

Commissions in London Rxeculed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 58 ' fl 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained | 

^PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ICI.Iir.lCS I. IHIt AIM 

239 Post Street San Francisco. Calif | 
■»■■■■,,■»,, ■■■■!■■ ■■ ■■■■■-4 

DR B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 



Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell Hours 9 t^ 

San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 



















p 

583 

Is 


arisian 

-mi - Prwssed 
Pot StueBT 

Vncmu Horn, 


Dyeing and 

Rv Uaad Only— Soils Called For 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

/'(i-nmn /'m in< and Cleaning 


CI 

■id II. 
Pno 


eaning 

iMired 

^n ftUMCI ' fi 

.E FtUHKLIM 2510 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes. Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 



| ' Russ ! 



Phone Hemlock 170 



San Francisco 



BEAUTY 

Wherever It Is Found 

Whether it's the living beauty 
of the "human form divine,'" 
the placid charm of a sun-lit 
lake, or the exquisite handwork 
of world-renowned artist — the 
beauty of the universe is cap- 
tured and reproduced in the 
pages cf The Chronicle Rota- 
gravu e. Don't miss it even for 
one Sunday — 

The 

^an iFraunaro 

(Hjwmirle 

ROTAGRAVURJ 

SAVE MONEY! 

Motorists Should Travel Via 

Golden Gate Ferry 

Between 

Sausalito and San Francisco 

Summer Schedule Now Effective 



FOUR FAST BOATS 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 



J A. 0. Stewart 
President 



Harry E. Speas 
lice-Pres. and Gen'l. Mgr. 



• : 



Time 




Card 



TIIK DEPEND \ nil . AUTOMOBILE FERRY Route offers 
motorists i In- shortest and most direct means of transporta- 
tion from Oakland, Snn Francisco, and nil points south, to 
Vnllejn. Sacramento, Sonoma, Napa and Lake Counties and 
nil points north. 

Automobile Fare. 55e; Adults, 10c; Children, 5c. 
The lowest ferry rates on San Francisco Bay. 



Leave Onk 


and 


III 


l.eave Vallejo 


Side at 




O 


Side 


at 


"SIIOICT-H 


A V" 


> 


MORROW 


COVE 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


t«:lllt 


2:40 


111 


t.1:45 


2:20 


0130 


3:00 


U) 


0:15 


2:40 


7:0(1 


3:20 




0:45 


3:00 


7:30 


3:40 


111 


7:15 


3:20 


8:00 


4 :00 


H 


7:45 


3:40 


8:20 


4:20 


3 


8:20 


4:00 


8:40 


4:40 


Z 


8:40 


4:20 


DlOO 


S:()0 




0:00 


4:40 


0:20 


5:20 


E 


0:20 


5:00 


0:40 


5:40 




0:40 


5:20 


10:00 


0:00 


X 


10:00 


5:40 


10:20 


8:20 




10:20 


0:00 


10:40 


6:40 


I 


10:40 


0:20 


11:00 


7:00 


1 

> 
< 


1 1 :00 


0:40 


1 1 :20 


7:20 


11:20 


7:00 


11:40 


7:40 


11:40 


7:20 


NOON 


8:00 


S 


NOON 


7:45 


12:00 


8:30 




12:00 


8:15 


P.M. 


0:00 


H 


P.M. 


8:45 


12:20 


9:30 


K 


12:20 


0:15 


12:40 


10:00 


O 


12:40 


0:45 


1:00 


10:30 


I 


1:00 


10:15 


1:20 


11:00 


CO 


1:20 


10:45 


1:40 


•11:30 




1:40 


•11:15 


2:00 


•12:00 


m 


2:00 


•11:4.". 


2:20 


•12:30 


I 




•12:15 




•1:00 


H 




•12:45 



- Sntnrdnj n. Sundays. IlolldnyM — Extra Trip* DurlnK lleiivy 
Trnlllc. tSimdiiyN and HolldavM only. 

AVF.X .1. fltVFnim. Pro*, n ml Ren, Mjrr. 




TOPS 

SEAT COVERS 

ENCLOSURES 

UPHOLSTERING 

BODY BUILDING 

REPAIRING 



"SI*. 



-j&* 



American Auto Painting Co. 

Incorporated 

Van Ness Avenue at Eddy Street 

W'm. B. Gibson, Mgr. Prospect 4296 



«*T 



"^ 







ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 




ATURDAY, JULY 18th, 1925 




$5.00 PER YEAR 



.OS ANGELI 



And ne'er did Grecian chisel trace 
A Nymph, a Naiad, or a Grace 
Of finer form or lovelier lace." 




The first of the new three-cylinder Southern Pacific type locomotives to arrive at Sacramento General Shops. 

Sixteen of these powerful locomotives have been ordered by the Company and will soon be placed in freight and 

passenger service over the Sierra Nevada and Siskiyou mountains 



FIRST of the sixteen new three- 
cylinder Southern Pacific type loco- 
motives are now in operation. 

The first two arrived at Sacramento 
General Shops the middle of June, 
where they were quickly placed in con- 
dition for active service. The other 
locomotives of this type are now in 
course of delivery. 

The new locomotives, which were 
built by the American Locomotive 
company with the co-operation of 
Southern Pacific's mechanical experts, 
attracted general interest on their way 
to Sacramento from the East. On their 
arrival at Sacramento they were the 
center of attention of employes and 
the leading citizens of Sacramento, in- 
cluding officers of the Sacramento 
Chamber of Commerce, joined with 
Southern Pacific representatives in 
holding a christening ceremony for 
"Locomotive 5000," shown in the cover 
photograph. 

The new locomotives will be used to 
haul passenger and freight trains in 
mountain territory. Thev embody 
many improvements and refinements 
of design and were described in detail 
in the February issue of the Bulletin. 

The outstanding feature of the loco- 
motive is a third cylinder placed inside 



the main frames, slightly above and 
between the two outside cylinders. 

The addition of the third cylinder 
corresponds to the increasing of the 
four cylinders in an automobile to -ix. 



mj#^.n* 




i ^p^ /^^^^^fltfeAl /Jfcic 


K^« .**« 


-% SmiJI £' 





This view of Locomotive No. 5000 
shows location of the three cyl- 
inders, one on each side and one in 
the center, 



with consequent smoother application 
of power. The locomotive has a 
"4-10-12" wheel arrangement and is a 
step in advance of the "2-10-2" and 
"4-8-2" types which heretofore have 
been considered the most modern de- 
velopment of locomotive construction. 
It is the most powerful, non-articulated 
or single unit locomotive yet designed. 

The new locomotives are 101 feet 1 
inch in length, weight 685,600 pounds 
and have a maximum tractive power 
of ''o,530 pounds. 

If a railroad inn be judged by its 
motive power, then every Southern Pa- 
cific employe can realize that he is a 
part of one of the best and most mod- 
ernly equipped transportation organi- 
zations. The placing of these locomo- 
tive- in service marks another forward 
step in the operating efficiency of the 
Company. 

Besides increasing power, the loco- 
motive is designed for fuel economy. 

In addition to these 16 Southern Pa- 
cific type locomotives, the Company i- 
now adding eighteen "4-8-2" mountain 
type locomotives which are under con- 
struction in its Sacramento -bop-. 
These locomotives are of the same type 
which have been making through runs 
of SI 5 miles between Los Angeles and 
El Paso. 




E.t.blkhed July 20. I&S6 




fll 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. 

Jr from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Sutter 8535 Entered at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill. E. C. London, 

England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 18, 1925 



No. 



LIBERTY! LIBERTY! 



This being Vacation time, and nothing much doing in 
the way of killing people off — except as regards some of 
these rum fights we are having, heat spells in the east, tor- 
nadoes in the middle west, etc., some of the people feel 
a mulish desire to stir up Old Man Trouble, as it were, 
and break the monotony of drowsy summer days ; in other 
words, throw a monkey wrench into the erstwhile smooth- 
running machinery of the good old U. S. A. 

* * * 

So — Now comes William Jennings Bryan and proves 
conclusively, by his actions, that there was much truth in 
the Darwinian theory. 

* * * 

Not content with trying to force wishy-washy soft drinks 

down our throats, instead of g 1 red wine, he assails our 

right to indulge in any religion that appeals to us. 

* * * 

He belongs to the class of rabid reformers who believe 
that our verv thoughts should be governed as well as our 

actions. 

* * * 

He has been bitten by that bacillus which wants to make 

mummies of us all. 

* * * 

We can imagine him compiling a questionnaire to be 
presented to everyone every morning, by a Federal officer, 
running something like this: 

* * * 

"Good Morning! Have you used Plum's soap?" 

* * * 

(Having specified a certain make of soap, woe be unto 
the citizen who dares to use any Other I) 

^* * * 
"Have you taken your iron today:" 



(Whether we need it or not, doesn't matter.) 

» * * 
"What did you do, Sunday. Mary or John?" 



(If you had a good time, and admit it. you must serve 

thirtv da\ s | 

* * * 

"How many times did you ki~- your wife last nicht." 

* * * 

(The official number of times allowed is ut the 

U. S. Inspector, catching a guilty glint in r eye. ar- 
rests you on suspicion, i 



"Have you bought more than two suits this year? If 
so, how many? Also, how many hats, shoes, B. V. D.'s, 
etc., etc.?" 

(If you have bought more than your specified quota of 
clothes, you will be forced to don a striped suit.) 

* * * 

"Have you ever had any monkey glands transplanted? 
If so, they must be removed, on pain of death!" 

* * * 

(Goat glands are allowed to stay. In fact, the Govern- 
ment believes in making goats of us!) 

* * * 

"Have you had a little drink, just a little drink?" 

(The U. S. Official smells your breath: Another "pinch" 

■ in suspicion ! I 

* * * 

"How many times did you laugh yesterday?" 

* * * 

(You must produce witnesses to prove that you have 
not been more hilarious than the law allows.) 

* * * 

"Have you imbibed any deleterious drinks, such as coffee, 
tea, chocolate? Consumed any candy, or other confec- 
tions?" 

* * * 

(Everything of this kind is taboo, along with tobacco.) 

* * * 

"Have you been guilty of producing more than your of- 
ficial allowance of offsprings?" 

* * * 

(You have two or three hidden in the cellar, but they 
won't be safe long, as they are beginning to raid the neigh- 
borhood. ) 

* * * 

"1- your number on straight?" 

* * * 

I Names are passe. We will all be numbered, and must 
apply to the local City Hall for licenses to live.) 

* * * 

"Has your breath-o-meter been read yet?" 

* * * 

(If you have been breathing too deeply, you will be 
fined for wasting air. i 

Continued indefinitely. 
Oh. Liberty, Liberty! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1925 




The delay in taking up the 
Street Railroad Purchase matter of the purchase of the 

Market Street Railway is one 
of the most inexplicable neglects of the municipal govern- 
ment. Here, we have a municipality which has taken in 
hand, with much bravery and quite considerable sagacity, 
the very difficult and intricate, to say nothing of violently 
controversial, matter of the Hetch Hetchy Power. Yet this 
municipality is quite dilatory on a matter of at least equal 
importance' the purchase of the Market Street Railways. 

It is not as if the subject had not been discussed. It lias 
been argued at length and the preponderance of valuable 
opinion "is all on the side of the purchase of the roads, with- 
out which there cannot be any proper manipulation or man- 
agement of the municipal railroad system. 

Where, then, does the trouble lie? It rests for the most 
part in the fact that there is not and has not been public 
agitation on the matter. The public is not interested, be- 
cause it is of the opinion that in a verv short time the fran- 
chises will expire and the property of the Market Street 
Railwav will become attainable without any trouble, a sort 
of ripe plum to fall into the mouth of the public. 

But this is far from the truth. Some of the franchises 
have quite a long time to run yet. Only 20 per cent of the 
total mileage of the Market Street Railways will come under 
the expiring franchises, which do not extend beyond 1930. 
The greater portion of the property of the roads is ii"t 
touched by franchises which expire so early. Very impor- 
tant franchises extend beyond 1940. and there is quite a con- 
siderable mileage covered by franchises which extend to 
1952, and even as far away as 1965. 

Let the wise citizen take heed. 



The situation in China does not 
The Chinese Situation really look any better. We have 
again to complain that the news 
service is not what it should be. An examination of the 
British papers, which are now arriving, with accounts of 
the trouble, show very clearly that we are not being well 
served and that the real points of the matter are not being 
revealed. That is quite important. 

The fact, of course, is that the American Association at 
Shanghai notified the American government that Americans 
needed protection for life and property. Now, just what do 
they mean by property? If they mean security for their 
personal effects, that is one thing; if they mean security for 
their investments, that is something else, again, for the se- 
curing of investments abroad is not yet a recognized duty 
of government. 

Then comes the question of extra-territoriality. Do we 
want to abolish that system? The British will not consent 
to its abolition, for the British do not think that the Chinese 
are stable enough and developed enough to secure fair play 
to foreigners in their courts. On the other hand. Senator 
Borah is against extra-territoriality. and Senator Borah is 
not popular with American citizens whose business compels 
them to live in China. It is so easy to be generous at the 
expense of other people! Such generosity is by no means 
the noblest thing when it eventuates in putting innocent 
people to the risk of their lives and liberties and the loss of 
their property. 

The Chinese question is by no means settled yet. 



M. Caillaux was sent for to repair the 
M. Caillaux' Task financial system of France. He is 
having a very hard time. He is a 
genius at finance, so we are all assured and there is no doubt 
that he possesses qualities of sagacity and address which 
few men have possessed and which are possibly unequalled 
today. But there are times when hard conditions make it 
impossible for able men to achieve anything more than 
mediocre men. One needs to have the time and the place 
for showing off one's talents. A fast runner will do no bet- 
ter than a clodhopper in a morass. 

The fall of the franc is so far unremedied. The means 
that M. Caillaux is taking to meet the occasion are such as 
should be apparent. They were apparent even to the out- 
siders. More taxes have to be raised, but how the govern- 
ment is going to have the nerve to properly raise those 
taxes is still the problem, which even the ability of M. Cail- 
laux has not yet solved. 

And yet. France is very prosperous. She has no unem- 
ploved problem, such as confronts Great Britain, where the 
tale of the unemployed is just as great as it was during the 
worst times of the liquidation, at the close of the war. In 
fact, the industries of France are in such good order that 
she has actually been importing mechanics from Italy. 

Now comes the Moroccan war. which will add greatly to 
the governmental expenses and render the position of the 
franc still more insecure, if the war is prolonged as it gives 
obvious signs of being prolonged. 

The franc problem is purely a governmental problem and 
surely a country so productive of ability should be able to 
find a better solution than has so far been offered to the 
world. 



We have a President who is at 
Income Tax Reduction least persistent. That is in itself 
a tremendous asset and one of 
the greatest attributes of men of conspicuous strength. His 
quietness is misleading to the critics. In these days of ad- 
vertising it is hard to understand a man who is self-confi- 
dent and needs no assurances from the mob. Sure of his 
purpose. Calvin Coolidge goes his way in strength and calm. 

Nowhere is this better seen than in his treatment of the 
matter of the reduction of the income tax, on which he has 
set his mind, and which is unquestionably of the greatest 
importance to the development of trade and the stimulation 
of industry. Income taxes. <ay.^ the President, should be 
reduced all down the line. He is right. 

Tax reduction hills must be introduced in accordance 
with his wishes, the drafting of them will be left to the ways 
and means committee of the House and to the officials of 
the treasury department. The only point being that the 
bills should be so drawn as to afford the greatest income, 
consonant with the most complete reduction in taxation. 

The President is of the opinion that the reduction of the 
surtax to 25 per cent would be the best method of attack- 
ing that form of taxation. Experts go beyond that, how- 
ever, and think that a cut to 12 per cent would meet the 
case and produce greater returns to the government as well 
as stimulate business. 

The President also is in favor of the abolition of the in- 
heritance tax. He would like to see it completely abolished, 
but it is more than doubtful if this could be done in the 
present temper of the House. 

There is no doubt at all about the correctness of the posi- 
tion of the executive great benefit will come to all of us if he 
can have his way. 



It is quite a question if we know much about 
Earthquakes earthquakes, after all. (If course, we know 

what happens. We have the most accurate 
and elaborate machinery and apparatus to tell us when we 
have an earthquake. That is something; but not so verv 



July 18, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



much. It seems to this humble scribe that we are always 
pretty well-informed about an earthquake when it happens. 
There is a sort of lingering impression that when an earth- 
quake does come it shakes things. Some things also tumble 
and are quite dangerously and noisily evident at the time. 
It would seem as if we did not need much apparatus to tell 
us when we have an earthquake. 

But says the scientist, the people in Rome and Paris and 
New York, and even in Moscow, when Trotzky is not speak- 
ing, can now also know that there is an earthquake somewhere 
else ; on the Pacific Coast perhaps. Yes, that is very clever ; but 
it does not appear to make much difference to the fact of the 
earthquake at the time, nor does it seem to help us to know how 
it happens,, when it may be expected, and when, if ever, we may 
have the ability to control or deal with earthquakes. 

This science about earthquakes is so very much like medi- 
cine, which ha s made such strides that a doctor can often 
come very near to telling you what is the matter with you! 
This is very interesting, but not altogether what you want. 
There is a feeling in the mind of the ordinary person that he 
does not want to be sick or, if sick, wants to be well again 
as soon as possible. 

We have somewhat the same feeling about earthquakes. 
If that science which we all so highly respect could only 
tell us just what causes those earthquakes we should' 
have learned something. At present, however, the only per- 
son of much use at an earthquake is a Red Cross nurse. 



There is much trouble over the new 
When Is Open Sea? ' twelve-mile limit and nobody seems 
to know where he is in the matter. 
Two federal courts have given very different opinions and 
the Department of Justice has decided to take the whole 
subject to the Circuit Court of Appeals for determination. 
Of course, it all arises from the question as to how far off 
shore a bootlegging craft must be in order to be immune 
from arrest and seizure. 

The case which will determine the issue as far as the 
Circuit Court of Appeals is concerned, relate-, to an Ameri- 
can ship called "Underwriter." which was ordered released 
by the District Court of Connecticut, upon the ground that 
the coast guard officials could not seize ships beyond the 
twelve mile limit fixed by the tariff act. 

i >n the other hand, Federal Judge Hutchinson of the 
Southern District of Texas, in the case of the British ves- 
sel "Panama," held that coast guards did have die right to 

search and seize vessels beyond the twelve-mile limit. This 
judge went to the extent of deciding that a vessel could 
be forfeited in one district for an offense committed in an- 
other district. 

The whole thing i-- very mixed at present and no one 
seems quite to know where lie is. in the presence of all the 

contrary and conflicting opinions. A- regards the liquor 

treaties between the United States and various foreign 

governments, tin agreement is that vessels suspected ol 

carrying contraband liquor may be searched, up to an hour's 

[sailing from the shore, but there is no definite distance set 
out. We do not understand, however, that the Department 
of Justice will ha' e that question in the case under appeal. 



California's Diamond Jubilee 

Belgium today joined the list of foreign nations that have 
accepted imitations to participate in California's Diamond 
Jubilee to be held in San Francisco. September 5 to Septem- 
ber 12. Acceptances had previously been received from 
England, Germany ami Mexico. 

News of Belgium's acceptance came in the form of a let- 
ter to Mayor James Rolph, Jr.. from Jules Simon, c 
general of Belgium at San Francisco. The letter follows: 

"Pear Mr. Mayor: Mr. Vandervelde, minister of foreign 
affairs at Brussels, informs me that you tendered to the Bel- 
gian Government an invitation to be officially represented 
at the celebration oi the seventy-fifth anniversary of the ad- 
mission of California as a state ^i the Union. 



"In the name of the Belgian cabinet, Mr. Vandervelde 
requested me to convey to you his sincere sentiments of 
appreciation for your courtesy and entrusted me with the 
mission to represent the Belgian government on this memor- 
able occasion. 

"Believe me, dear Mr. Mayor, 
"Yours faithfully. 
"Jules Simon, 

"Consul General of Belgium." 

Indications now are that in addition to England, Ger- 
many. Belgium and Mexico, participating in the fete, there 
will also be France, Italy, Japan, China and Cuba. 

Marshal Hale, chairman of the Jubilee's foreign participa- 
tion committee, has written to Angelo J. Rossi, general 
chairman, from London, stating that he had taken up the 
matter of participation with M. Dejon, minister of foreign 
affairs for France, and that it had been decided to have Am- 
bassador Daeschner at Washington represent France. How- 
ever, this action awaited official confirmation by Foreign 
Secretary Briand. 

Italy has tentatively promised to participate, Hale wrote, 
and the invitation had been formally given to Switzerland 
through Giuseppe M|otta, chief of the political department 
at Berne. 

Hale also said that he was working through R. M. Tobin 
of San Francisco, American ambassador to the Netherlands, 
to have action taken by Holland on the invitation. 

Hale is making particularly strenuous efforts to obtain 
the presence of King Alphonso of Spain at the fete. The 
Spanish monarch is planning a visit to America and Cali- 
fornia in the near future and as California's history began 
as a province of old Spain, it is not unlikely that the king 
will lend a willing ear to the proposal. 



The New Market Street Railway Cars 

The new gayly painted Market Street Railway Cars have 
attracted attention from all wdio have seen them. The pub- 
lic in general, however, is under the impression that these 
cars are not new Iv built ; it has the idea that they are simply 
old cars painted blue and gold. This is an erroneous idea, 
for these cars are new cars, equipped with the latest safety 
appliances and arranged for the comfort of the passengers. 

There has been much comment as to why these vehicles 
have been adorned with this coat of blue and gold, but be- 
fore deciding upon the color, the management of the Market 
Street Railway placed ballot boxes in the cars, on June 9th, 
1925, and a ballot was given to each passenger, to vote upon 
the question of paint. The passengers cast their votes, and 
placed their ballots in tile ballot boxes, and the votes were 
counted during the day by I la-kins & Sells, certified public 
accountants. The following i- a copy of their affidavit : 

Certificate 

We herein certify that we have counted the ballots 
contained in the ballot box carried June '>. 1925, 01 
No. JU>1 operated by the Market Street Railway Company 
to -ecure an expression from the passengers as to their 
opinion of the blue and gold car. and find that the box con- 
tained 849 votes reading Yes, indicating approval and 36 
votes reading No, indicating disapproval. 

i Signed i Haskins & Sells. 
San Francisco, fune 9, 1925. 



Auto Service Plus 

"I didn't recognize my own car when 1 got it back from 
LUtO Service Plus," said a friend of ours recently, who 
had just come home from a strenuous trip over California 
mountain roads. "It was cleaned, washed, vacuumed and 
polished until it shore like a mirror, and it certainly did not 
bear the least resemblance to the shabby old vehicle that I 
brought to til;- at the northwest corner of Van 

Xc- \vcn::c and Ellis street. Take your car to this place, 
no matter what condition it is in. and have it rejuvenated.'' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1925 




>LE/ISURE'SWW 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moore. 




Columbia 

Guthrie McClintic, one of the lead- 
ing young directors of New York pro- 
duced the comedy. "Mrs. Partridge 
Presents — " by Mary Kennedy and 
Ruth Hawthorne, running for six 
months at the Belmont Theater, with 
Blanche Bates as the star, which com- 
mences an engagement at the Colum- 
bia theater Monday evening. 

This is said to be a thoroughly mod- 
ern work. It joshes the Lucy Stone 
league, spoofs mob psychology and 
flouts that formidable octopus, mater- 
nal authority. It shows the struggle 
of a self-reliant business woman to 
give her children all the advantages 
denied her. 

This role is said to fit Blanch Bates 
charmingly and added another link to 
her already long chain of successful 
interpretations. 

There is a strong cast, including 
Charles Waldron, Edward Emery. Jr., 
William Worthington, Edmund 
George. Edwin H. Morse, Katherine 
Revner, Carlotta Irwin. Augusta Havi- 
land, Muriel Kirkland. Suzanna Feday 
and others. 



California 

"Marry Me," a romantic story of a 
butter and Qgg merchant, is the feat- 
ure at the California this week. This 
picture was directed by James Cruze 
and features Florence Vidor and Ed- 
ward Everett. 



President 

"The Best People." Avery Hop- 
wood's lively comedy, has proved a 
notable attraction at Henry Duffy's 
President Theater, and starts on its 
sixth week tomorrow. The Tuesday 
and Sunday matinees have proved to 
be very popular indeed. 



Beatty's Casino 

After many vicissitudes since it was 
vacated by Will King, the Casino The- 
ater, closed for two months, will re- 
open its doors this afternoon. Under 
the same name, Beatty's Casino, the 
playhouse at the corner of Ellis and 
Mason Streets, will henceforth be op- 
erated as a motion picture theater. 
Douglas Fairbanks' "Thief of Bagdad" 
will be the opening feature under the 
new regime. 



By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 

Curran 

The Curran reports capacity busi- 
ness at their theatre, and this is quite 
as it should be. "No, No, Nanette," is 
great entertainment. The music is 
catchy, it is a beautifully staged pro- 
duction, and there is never a dull mo- 
ment from start to finish. 

There is a splendid chorus, and they 
sing and dance well. If you haven't 
yet arranged to see this show, by all 
means do so at once. 



Alcazar 

Henry Duffy's splendid production 
of "Irene" continues as the attraction 
at the Alcazar for a seventh week be- 
ginning tomorrow. Nothing has been 
left undone by the management to 
make this revival of "Irene" a notable 
one. Duffy's wisdom in bringing most 
of the New York Company for his pre- 
sentation of this popular piece is borne 
out by the smooth performance. The 
complete cast includes: Walter Regan. 
Henry Coote, Dorothy La Mar, Ralph 
Murphy, Walter White, Bernice Ber- 
u in and Henrv Caubisens. 



Imperial 

Crowds continue to throng to the 
Imperial to see that great spectacle, 
"The Ten Commandments." Theo- 
dore Roberts as Moses, and a strong 
supporting cast are the players. There 
is a fine musical score accompanying 
the picture. 



Loew's Warfield 

"The Talker." featuring Anna Q. 
Nilsson and Lewis Stone, with an un- 
usually strong supporting cast, is now 
being shown at the Warfield. This 
Story was adapted from Marion Fair- 
fax's stage play of the same title. It 
is said to be an ultra modern story, 
picturing the life in a home managed 
by a talky wife who is continually ex- 
pounding her theories of sex equality. 
Lipschultz and his .Music Masters have 
a special score in classical concert 
music arranged for this bill. 

Golden Gate 

Golden Gate Patrons will enjoy one 
of the musical treats of the season this 
week as Isham Jones, famous New 
York and Chicago jazz band leader, 



with his well-known Brunswick record- 
ing orchestra, is the headliner. They 
will present a selection of popular num- 
bers featuring many of Mr. Jones' lat- 
est numbers including "It Had To Be 
You" and "Headin' Home." 

The screen feature is "The Awful 
Truth," a comedy drama adapted from 
the famous stage play, with Agnes 
Ayres in the feature role, supported 
by Warner Baxter and Phillips Smal- 
ley. Others on the bill are Jones and 
Kenyon, banjo artists, assisted by a 
trio of dancing beauties and Dinty Mc- 
Shey, the Irish Cop, in a monologue. 
The usual short films, music by Grace 
Rollins Hunt, organist, and Claude 
Sweeten's orchestra complete the bill. 



Granada 

The latest Zane Grey novel, a book 
which sold over a million copies, has 
just been completed by William K. 
Howard for -Paramount release, and 
will be seen at the Granada this week. 
It is said to be one of the most graphic 
and faithful visualizations of the re- 
maining vestige of frontier America, 
when banded outlawry made its final 
stand against law and order. Jack 
Holt and Noah Beery are the featured 
players. 



Capitol 

It was the dream of Frank Bacon's 
life to some day appear in San F.an- 
cisco in "Lightnin'," the play which 
brought him world-wide success and 
fame, and to have with him in the cast, 
his wife and daughter. The actor- 
author had written a part for Mrs. 
Bacon. — "Ma Jones," but on the eve 
of his New York premiere. Mrs. Bacon 
was taken ill, and could not appear. 
Then just when it seemed as though 
his wish might be fulfilled. Fate stepped 
in, and shattered the dream of a life- 
time. Now, many months after the 
shock of the famous star's demise. 
Mrs. Bacon will appear in the part 
written for her by her famous husband. 
She will be co-featured with Thomas 
Jefferson in the production which 
opens at the Capitol Theater this eve- 
ning. 

With her will be her daughter. Bes- 
sie Bacon. Miss Bacon has been :\ 
member of the original company ever 
since its first presentation. 



July 18, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



AZTEC ) 
Markt-t nr. Eighth (. 
EGYPTIAN I 
Market at Jones '_ 



Pictures 



ALEXANDRIA 
Genry and 18th 



ALCAZAR 
O'Fnrrell nr. Powell 

CALIFORNIA 

4th and 3Iarket 

CAMEO 

»3(! Market St. 

CAPITOL 
Market and ElliH 



CASINO 
Mason and Ellis 



CASTRO 
420 Castro St. 



COLISEUM 
Clement and Oth 



COLUMBIA 
Eddy and Mason 



CURRAN 
Geary nr. Mason 



GOLDEN GATE 

G. G. Ave. and Taylor 



GRANADA 
10(1(1 Market St. 



HAIGHT 
HalKht at Cole 



IMPERIAL 
1077 Market St. 



LOEWS WARFIELD 
B88 Mnrket St. 



MAJESTIC 
Mission between 
20th and 21st 



METROPOLITAN 
2o.it. Union St, 



Pictures 



Henry Duffy Players, 
"Irene" 



"Marry Me" 



"Silent Sanderson" 
with Harry Carey 



"Lightnin' " 



"Thief of Bagdad" 



Pictures 



Pictures 



Blanche Bates, 
"Mrs. Partridge" 



"No, No, Nanette" 



Vaudeville 



"The Light 
of Western Stars" 



Pictures 



"The Ten 
Commandments" 



"The Talker" 



Pictures 



Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE ) 
1820 Fillmore (^ 



NEW MISSION 
ZG50 Mission 



\ 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM 1 

OFarrell and PowelM Vaudeville 


PANTAGES | 

.. . . . m _ { vaudeville 

Market n( Mnson \ 


PORTOLA 1 

..„.. . . i Pictures 

770 Mnrket ) 


PRESIDENT J _. „ 
«„,t.,*«a r | "The Best People' 


ROYAL 1 

UW Polk St. t Pictures 


SUTTER 1. 

sutt.r nn.l stelner \ Pictures 


UNION SQUARE } 

«.l..rrell nr. Powell ( Pictures 


WILKES | Lenore Ulric 

t;enry nnd Mason \ "Kiki." 


WIGWAM 1 
■tataniai ( Pictures 



Orpheum 

Patrons of this theater are promised 
a big surprise this week, sure to be a 
delight to all lovers of vaudeville and 
this surprise will make the bill at the 
Orpheum one of the outstanding sen- 
sations of the season. 

William Caxton and his company of 
six players will be seen in a delightful 
one act play, entitled "Kisses" which 
is from the pen of that noted news- 
paperman, S. fay Kaufman. Mr. Cax- 
ton is a San Francisco boy and was a 
protege of the late Nat Goodwin. 

William Frawley and Edna Louise, 
big' musical comedy favorites will also 
be on the bill with an offering called 
"Hey, Red." The Herbert and Bolt 
Trio, marvelous slow motion athletes 
will also be seen. 

"Oklahoma" Bob Albright will pre- 
sent a characteristic song cycle, as- 
sisted by Jean King and Leonard Ste- 
vens ; Roy Cummings, the comedian 
who tears his clothes, does many funny 
falls and gets off many "wise" cracks 
will remain over for a second week 
He is assisted by Irene Shaw; Jane 
Green, great singer of "blue" songs, 
has been persuaded to stay over for a 
third week. 



Wilkes 

Monday evening marks the opening 
of a limited engagement of David Be- 
lasco'> adaption of "Kiki." Andre Pi- 
card's character study, starring Le- 
nore Ulric. Miss Ulric has been 
playing to capacity audiences in New 
York City for over two years in this 
role, and she has been acclaimed by 
many critics as one of three outsand- 
ing figures in the history of the con- 
temporary American stage. 

Heading the cast in the support of 

ilii— great star is Frederick Vogeding 
in the role of Victor Renal, manager 
of the Follies Monplaisir Music Hall, 

This -terling actor was last seen in 
San Francisco in support of Doris 
Keane in "Starlight" and won a host 
of friends and admirers through his 
splendid interpretation of the part. 



Capitol 

July ISth marks the date on which 
"Lightnin"' will open at the Capitol 

Theater with a splendid company, 
headed by Frank Bacon's widow and 

daughter. In the hands of Thomas 
Jefferson, Lightnin' Bill is the same 
gentle vagabond that his father made 
of "Rip Van Winkle." and it is pre- 
dicted that the younger Jefferson will 
occupy the same spot in the hearts of 
today's theater-poers that his distin- 
guished -ire he'd with their grandpar- 
ent-. 



Laugh and the world laughs with 
you : weep and the world laughs any- 
wav. 



<lL 



m 



Be&ioni 

CHICAGO 



AD VANTAG ES 

OVERLOOKING BELMONT 
YACHT HARBOR AND 
LINCOLN PARK GOLF 
COURSES • • • 
ANEW MOTEL-700 ROOMS 
OPENED EARLY IN 1924 
ALREADY FAMOUS FOR 
ITS HOSPITABLE 
ATMOSPHERE • • • 
•> «s« «s» 

SUMMER RATES 
WRITE FOR BOOKLET 

G.E.Billingslei) 




The big ones are biting in lake 
am) Stream) Come to the moun- 
tain reson where outdoor recre- 
ations abound. Swimming— golf- 
ing — horseback riding. Dancing 
f\ er> night. Write for folder 
and rates to Walter Roun-rwl. 



Feather River 




Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the Fdice of the Berkeley Hills 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



NORTHERN California the locale for motion pictures' 
Why not? 

This was the significant keynote sounded at the Hotel 
Senator in Sacramento, Capital City of the State, quite re- 
cently. 

The distinguishing occasion was a beautiful banquet and 
ball given by the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and 
other prominent citizens of the great commonwealth in 
compliment to James Cruze, director, and the stars appear- 
ing in the cast of a new picture, "The Pony Express" which 
was filmed in Sacramento. 

Postmaster Harold McCurry, president of the Chamber 
of Commerce, opened the banquet proceedings and immedi- 
ately placed the program into the capable hands of the 
toastmaster, Mr. George W. Peltier, president of the Farm- 
ers and Mechanics Bank. With skill and thorough under- 
standing, Mr. Peltier enthusiastically and logically pro- 
claimed Northern California as commendable scenic and 
historical ground for motion picture purposes. 

"From a motion picture viewpoint we have within the 
radius of a few miles of Sacramento more scenic and out- 
door attractions than are to be found in any other area 
of similar size in the world," declared Mr. Peltier, in mak- 
ing his memorable speech, "And all of these points are 
easily accessible by railway and highway." 

In enumerating what Mr. Peltier chose to term, "Cali- 
fornia's Wonderland" he pointed significantly to the incom- 
parable Yosemite Valley with its matchless scenic wonders. 
He reminded the audience of the beauties of Lake Tahoe, 
of Donner Lake, Lassen Volcanic Park ; of Mount Shasta, 
the Summit of the rugged Sierras, and stressed their world- 
famed historical value and sequences as well as their natural 
beauty. 

Mr. Peltier drew a graphic word picture in describing the 
beaches of the Pacific Ocean, the rivers, canyons, valleys 
and mountains. 

"Do you know that we have empires within empires in 
Northern California?" and Mr. Peltier, toastmaster for the 
memorable Chamber of Commerce banquet, presented glow- 
ing statistics to prove his assertions. The speaker made 
facts and figures so fascinating that they reverberated with- 
in one's memory and sank into the mind like pleasing tonic 
and awakening elixir. The best part of it all was that the 
sound and substantial arguments were clothed in their own 
glory, arousing high respect and lofty consideration. 

"One can ride through twenty miles of sugar beets with 
approximately 80,000 tons maturing in August," said Mr. 
Peltier, "and it will take a special beet sugar train of 40 
cars, fifty days, daily, to transport them to the sugar mills." 

Mr. Peltier then called attention to the illuminating fact 
that the largest and best agricultural development in the 
world is at Sutter Basin with 75.000 acres under the plow. 
He told us that the largest lemon orchard in the world is 
located at Maxwell, Colusa County, within a short distance 
of Sacramento and quoted authorities to further substanti- 
ate his statement, adding that this lemon orchard consisted 
of 800 acres of land. 



M/my stirring facts were inculcated in the famous ad- 
dress made by the President of the Sacramento Bank, while 
with civic fervor he recounted the advantages and privi- 
leges wdiich amazed even those who long have lived in 
California. As he revealed the glorified facts which were 
nothing short of a revelation, Mr. Peltier emphasized the 
scenic, as well as the commercial urge, for motion pictures 
in this part of the western empire. 

"Do you know that one of the largest and finest orange 
groves in California is located near Hamilton, Colusa 
County?" inquired the prominent citizen. "This remark- 
able orange grove contains 350 acres. Also let me remind 
you, ninety-five per cent of all canned asparagus in the 
world is raised in the deltas of the Sacramento and the 
San Joaquin rivers and there are twelve asparagus fac- 
tories on the Sacramento River, alone," he said. 

Calling our attention to the scenic value of the Sacra- 
mento River and its environment for motion picture pur- 
poses, Mr. Peltier reminded the assemblage that ninety-five 
per cent of all the almonds produced in America were 
handled through the great almond packing plant in Sacra- 
mento. 

Every California!! should know all of these things, of 
course, but we didn't know, or at least we didn't fully real- 
ize what a prodigiously opulent land is ours until the pre- 
siding genius of that memorable banquet 'presented some 
mighty revelations. We had assembled, ostensibly, for the 
purpose of admiring the screen celebrities and bestowing 
upon them the homage that is their due. We were given 
in addition, some substantial food for thought at that note- 
worthy event, and I'm a-thinking we shall always remem- 
ber with pride Mr. Peltier's awakening address and be 
grateful to this man-of-affairs for acquainting us with the 
privileges and advantages of this "part of Paradise." 

Society was intensely interested in all that transpired 
at the banquet given by the Sacramento Chamber of Com- 
merce and particularly concerned with all that Mr. George 
W. Peltier said. Participating in the deliberations as they 
did at the Hotel Senator, society folks are acclaiming anew 
the remarkable advantages in this part of the western em- 
pire for motion picture productions, and the filming of 
more mighty pictures. 

It was a superlative treat to be so splendidly informed 
as we were at that banquet, and to be part of the loyal fer- 
vor and enthusiasm which encompassed the occasion. 

Lofty information of such a nature stirs the appreciation 
and stimulates the mind of him who elects to have and to 
hold its purport and to value its significant revelation-.. 

Impressive Mare Island 
Wedding Last Saturday 

An impressive wedding took place last Saturday. July 11. 
in the St. Peter's Chapel at Mare Island navy yard, when 
Miss Mary Gorgas, daughter of Captain Miles Gorgas, 
U. S. N., retired, and Mr. Henry Carlisle, son of Mr. and 



COLONIAL HOTEL 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 



050 iiuni, Street, iietvree* Powell and Stoekton. Son FrnnclHco j Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

Telephone Sutter 3560 j J 401 Crocker Building 

HOWARD T. BLETHBN. Proprietor j Telephone Sutter 6J30 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



lulv 18, 1925 



SAN FRANCIS* '< > VI'AVS LETTKR 



Mrs. George Lister Carlisle of New York, were 
united in marriage, the service being read by 
Rev. .Mark Rifenback of St. Clement's chapel, 
Berkeley. 

About 150 guests attended the 3 o'clock cere- 
mony in the little navy chapel, and the recep- 
tion afterward at the quarters of Rear-Admiral 
and Mrs. John H. Dayton at the navy yard. 

Miss Gorgas was given into the keeping of 
her husband by Captain Gorgas. 

The bride wore a gown of soft ivory satin. 
A bertha of Carrickmacross lace fell at one 
shoulder in a cascade to the hem of her frock. 
Carrickmacross and rose point lace ornamented 
the full tulle wedding veil, a possession of the 
late Mrs. Miles Gorgas. The veil fell to the 
hem of the train, and at the coiffure it was held 
by a coronet of rose point lace decorated with 
clusters of orange blossoms. She carried lilies 
of the valley. 

Mrs. William Shaw, the matron of honor, 
was in lettuce green georgette. Her frock and 
the frocks of the three bridesmaids were made 
alike with bouffant skirts in graduated godets 
and short capes of georgette. Streamers of ribbon fastened 
the capes, falling slightly below the waist, and they all 
wore drooping hats of horsehair decorated with petals ot 
green at the edges and a cluster of soft petals at one side. 
They carried sheafs of rose snap-dragons and delphinium. 

The bridesmaids were Miss Mary and Miss Caroline 
Nielson, cousin of the bride, and Miss Elizabeth Stuart 
Cooper. 

Mrs. Carlisle for her going away wore a frock of flat 
crepe in navy blue with a small navy blue hat. She is a 
Junior League girl, and a popular member of the younger 
set in San Francisco, where she has made 
her father since his retirement. 




151. ( \ VllOltlll it\ 
Sllltn- Street 

Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 
250 Itoums 
From $2.!io jn-r day 



Dr. and Mrs. Janke Go on 
Vacation to Canada 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter E. Janke left recently 
for a two months' vacation tour of the United 
States and Canada. Mrs. Janke is one of the 
pretty, talented young matrons of this city 
whose dramatic work is art, itself.: Her char- 
acter portrayals are skillfully given and her 
manner of presentation typical of her charm- 
ing and dainty personality. 

# * * 

Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle, who is passing 
some time at Wawona, has extended her plans 
and will not return to her San Mateo home 
until July 23. 

Miss Dorothy Crawford, the young com- 
poser of San Francisco, who is now traveling 
in Europe with Mrs. C. C. Moore and Miss 
Mary Bernice Moore is now at present in Ger- 
many, according to word received here. Dor- 
othy Crawford is one of the California musi- 
cians whose work registers high achievement. 
Mr. and Mrs. James Crawford of 



her home with 



Griffin-McDonald Wedding 

At a charming simple ceremony at < )ld St. Mary's on 
Grant avenue recently, Miss Effy Griffin was married to 
|. A. McDonald, Rev. Father Bradley officiating. 

The bride was given in marriage by her father, William 
H. Griffin, and Miss Ethel Griffin, a -i-I.T. acted as matron 
of honor. The groom was attended by his brother. Peter 
McDonald. The bride wore a simple, graceful frock of 
white chiffon with a picture hat of white chiffon, and her 
attendant was in peach chiffon, with a black bat. After 
the service a breakfast was served at the (lift. 

Mr. and Mrs. McDonald arc motoring through the South, 
and at the conclusion of their honeymoon will make their 
home at Fresno. * * * 

Wife of Author Goes to 
Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. E, A. Mclnnes of San Francisco recently accom- 
panied Mrs. Peter I'. Iwnc. wife of the California author. 
Upon a short motor trip from New York 
ton. D. C. While in the capital Mr- 

Mclnnes are guests at the Mayflower. 



Citj to \\ ashing- 

Kvne and Mrs. 



Mrs. Lorenco M. Vvenali left recently for a two months' 
mil abroad She will be met in Spain by her brother. Major 
Bertram I.. Cadwallader, I". S V Major Cadwallader has 

been an attache at the American Embassy at Her! 
some time. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTX M\RI \. CuiFORNIV 

On Ihv Q«l Hi*hw«r BalflM] Bel»»*n S»n Frsncto and I M AngtiM. 

An Inn of Uu.uil bwBkVM* 

Vv or HTUf for r«Mrrot*MU om yomr ■«« trip aoruh. 



She is the daughter of 

this city. * * * 

Mrs. Richard F. Thomlinson is one of the many San Fran- 
ciscans who have joined the summer migration to Euro- 
pean watering places. Accompanied by her daughter, Miss 
F'rances Thomlinson. Mrs. Thomlinson left recently for 
Cjuebec, where she will sail directly for France. 

* * * 

Mrs. Kluegel Entertains 

Mr. and Mrs. 11. A. Kluegel were hosts at their home 
on Canyon road in Berkeley at an open house for their son. 
Jack Kluegel, and some of his friend- among the visiting 
midshipmen. Kluegel is on leave from the Naval Academy 
at Annapolis. 

Assisting Mr-. Kluegel were Mrs, Frederick Funston, 
Mrs. Robert [verson I licks II. Mr-. Catherine Brown White, 
Mrs, Ralph Phelps, Mrs. Walter Scott Gannon and Miss 
\ erena Jennings, and some of the young girls who assisted 
at entertaining the many visitors were: 

Mis-es Helen Chase, Geraldine Gannon, Edna Chase. Kath- 
leen Gannon, Leslie Phelps, Mary Grant, Mathilde Humphries, 
Jean Leonard. Alma Spreckels, Louise Sherer, Amelie Bel 

knap, Anita Glass, Alice Bulkley, Sallie Bacon. 

* * '* 

Hold Open House 

Captain and Mr-. Robert E. Morris held open house yes- 
terday for civilian and service friend- for their son. Mid- 
shipman Robert Morris, Jr. 

Captain and Mrs. Charles I'cahody Huff also entertained 
,i contingent of civilian society at their home, asking their 
friends to meet their twin sons. Midshipman Charles, Jr. 

and Midshipman George Huff. 

* * * 

Chester X. Weaver, president of the Chester N". Weaver 

Company, ha- returned with Mrs. Weaver from a 
months' business and pleasure trip in Europe and northern 
Africa. Much of the traveling was done by motor car and 
Weaver reports American-made cars very popular in F.uro- 
pean countries, where the price of gasoline is not too high 
for I nes and the import duties are not prohibi- 

tive. 

(Continuei! on Pae< 






AGUA C ALIENTE SPRINGS - Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN. Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 192S 



^Si^ 



-sways* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



-s^ays* 



-5\J, 



y»» 



Olympic Evolutionists in Lakeside Golf Tournament 




For the Monkey 
Theory 
Hugh King McKevitt 
Phil Wand 
Jim Brennan 
Louis Ferrari 
Dr. Carney Bricca 
Dr. DeArcy Quinn 
John F. Cunningham 



Against the Monkey 

Theory 
William H. McCarthy 
Judge T. I. Fitzpatrick 
Judge Tom Graham 
judge Ed Shortall 
Dr. Floyd Russell 
Colonel Oscar Turnblad 
John Kortick 



The Mosquito Theory — Ritchie Roberts, the Farallones Fly. 

* * * 

The Elephant Theory — Charlie Ash, and Harry I. Stafford. 

* * * 

Throw a cocoanut off the first tee and if Fred Solari doesn't 

grab for it. there is nothing in the monkey theory. 

* * * 

John Cunningham wants the trees to grow faster so he can 
jump from arbor to arbor. 

* * * 

Ivan Ward is busy manufacturing monkey cages. 

* * * 

Make an extra one for yourself, Ivan. 

* * * 

Duke Du Common will furnish the paint for the cage. 

* * * 

Charlie Arata will furnish the lettuce, nuts and ear-rings for 
die monkeys. 

* * * 

Someone stole Charlie Arata's monkey from him in Cin- 
cinnati. 

* * * 

Too bad they didn't stead his hand organ, too. 

* * * 

Jim Brennan is still covering Europe and is probably 
introducing red flannels, chewing gum and toothpicks to 
the benighted Europeans. 

* * * 

The Rabbit theory — Hugo Ramacciotti. 

* * # 

Tom Delury has gone to Alaska to study the theory — 
Hope he has a one-way ticket. 

* * * 

Dr. Floyd Russell and Emperor Stafford are both tak- 
ing a course of instructions from Dr. Clayton Wheeler, 
the eminent golfer. 

* * * 

Eddie Twiggs is the sweater champion "only" ! 

Jack Houston said there must be something in the theory, 
as Joe Loughrey climbed a tree to play a mashie shot. 

Colonel Mund doesn't believe in monkey business. He 
plays golf according to Hovle. 

* * * 

Jack Wellington Houston says that the Orang-utans 
used niblicks in the Jungle eight centuries ago, to split 
cocoanuts open. 

* * * 

Judge Shortall says he has found, from his scientific re- 
search work, that the ringtail monkeys acted as caddies for the 
big Baboons. * * * 

Judge Fitzpatrick wants to know which came first — the 
monkey or the peanuts. 



Judge Graham says the Ape has a natural swing with a 
shillalah. 

* * * 

John Harrigan says Fred Solari is all wrong on the mon- 
key theory. 

* * * 

Every time Doc Mjervy tops one his Toupe laughs — So 
does Doc McDaniels. 

* * * 

Doc Weider laughs at both of them. 

* * * 

"Monkey glands are wonderful things," remarked Jack 
Percy, when he tried to shinny up a tree while on his va- 
cation. 

* * * 

A little man named Douglas 

Sits 'neath a tree and mopes, 
But just because he does this 

Is no sign he's kin of Scopes. 

* * * 

Just because Frank Klimm plays his shots out of trees 
is no reason that he will be called as a witness in the Scopes 
trial. 

* * * 

Marshall Scobey says he is tired of all this "monkey" 
business and from now on he is going to fool them all. 
(Continued on Page 15) 




i$attl Sel (ftnnma&o 

American Plan 

Where the cordiality of welcome is followed 
by efforts of every employe to obligingly meet 
all requirements for the comfort and happi- 
ness of guests. Summer Rates in effect. 

A HOMELIKE ATMOSPHERE 

With entertainment of a high character pro- 
vided within the hotel: an almost unlimited 
variety of recreation also available on land, 
bay or ocean. 

Golf On All Grass Courses 

Swimminc, Aquaplaninc, Boating, Fishinc 

Dancing Except Sunday Nights 

EARL FEGAN'S CASINO ORCHESTRA 

San Francisco Acent: W. H. Ramace 
Oceanic Bldc, 2 Pine Street 

Mel S. Wright, Manager 

CORONADO BEACH, CALIFORNIA 



July 18, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

Lewis F. Byington gave one of his bril- 
liant talks before secretaries of the cham- 
bers of commerce attending a summer 
school at Stanford University on some of 
the forthcoming activities of the Califor- 
nia Diamond Jubilee. Byington is a leader 
in the Jubilee celebration. 

Many well-known San Francisco men 
and women donned the Spanish costumes 
to be worn during the Jubilee in illustration of the lec- 
ture and festivities described by Mr. Byington. 

Joseph M. Cumming, secretary of the Down Town As- 
sociation, was one of the prominent men appearing in the 
colorful Spanish costume. Others included: Harry Gold- 
berg, Malcom Fraser, W. F. Hamilton, Mrs. M. A. Ross, 
Miss Elizabeth Hole, M|iss Eva Covert, Miss Bernice Lit- 
tle, Mrs. Myrl C. Keenan, Leroy Aubrey and Daniel C. 
Imboden. 

The secretaries of the chambers of commerce pledged 
their enthusiastic support of the Diamond Jubilee celebra- 
tion to be held in San Francisco and offered to do all within 
their power to interest the hearty co-operation of their 
respective communities. The eventful affair was one of 
the lively pre-celebration occasions which presage the suc- 
cess of the state celebration in September. 

* * * 

Announcement was made at the recent gathering of the 
Down Town Association of the coinage of 300.000 special 
50-cent pieces bearing California's bear in bas relief on one 
face and California's "forty-niner" on the other, to be used 
in commemoration of the State's Diamond Jubilee. Jo 
Mora, California sculptor, who achieved fame with his 
Junipero Serra memorial at Carmel. designed the coins. 

Once minted, the coins will be distributed through San 
Francisco and Los Angeles clearing houses. The Sin 
Francisco mint will finish the first allotment of these coins 
early in August, according to official announcement. 

Through the efforts of Congressman Raker and Sen- 
ator Shortridge, the legal process of adopting the coin 
passed through Congress and was signed by President 
Coolidge during the month of February. 

* * * 

The race between aces of the National Guard Flying 
Squadron which takes place Saturday. July IS. is elicit- 
ing excitement among citizens of the entire country. 

Nine men signed up for the race and Major C. C. Mose- 
ley is encouraging all of his men to participate. The prize 
money will he shared between officers and enlisted men 
of the three planes making the highest scores. 

Should an) unexpected emergency cripple a ship en 
route pilots and observers will he prepared to demonstrate 
the efficiency of the new parachute packs. Each man 
wears one of these life-saving devices strapped to his 
hack, and when a plane starts to fall he merely steps out 
on a wing, jumps off and pulls the string that releases his 
parachute. 

All landing fields have been carefully charted and cleared 
so that the chances of mishap are greatly minimized. The 
planes will have undergone daily tests and in-- :tion before 
they make the start. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

The Association of Pioneer Women of California is plan- 
ning an elaborate anniversary breakfast which will take place 
Saturday, August 29, at the Palace Hotel, Mrs. Clara Mundt, 
chairman of the day. 

Costumes worn by the belles of California during early pio- 
neer days will be a feature of the historical day with special 
attention to the features of the California Diamond Jubilee cele- 
bration. 

Mothers, daughters and granddaughters will participate in 
the festivities, gowns of the fifties being the mode of the hour 
and other pioneer accessories will be added to the festive atmos- 
phere. Decorative schemes will introduce something never be- 
fore attempted by women's organizations and promise to out- 
distance their preceding events of noteworthy recognition. 

As the day significantly marks the silver birthday of the Asso- 
ciation of Pioneer Women, there will also be innovations by 
way of surprise features. Invitations have already been ex- 
tended to many presidents of local clubs as the guests of the 
Association. 

* * * 

Members of the Pacific Coast Women's Press Association 
gave a "Summer Tea" last Tuesday, July 14, in honor of 
friends who were participants in the program' of their thirty- 
fifth anniversary on June 8. given at the St. Francis Hotel. 

The association will maintain headquarters during the Dia- 
mond Jubilee celebration, September 5 to 12, on the mezzanine 
floor of the St. Francis Hotel. Visiting writers, illustrators 
and composers will find a register there, it is stated, and a mem- 
ber of the association in charge to welcome them and assist 
them in locating friends and making arrangements for their 

stav. 

* * * 

The hoard of school trustees of Newcastle, Placer County, 
has supplied a practical answer for the puzzling question put 
to the State Department of Education this week by statisticians 
seeking to ascertain whether the teaching efficiency of a woman 
instructor is better or worse after she marries. Holding that 
wedding hells make for better teachers, the Newcastle board has 
selected a public school faculty for the coming term made up en- 
tirely of married women. 

* * * 

Miss Lillian 1'.. Connolly, club editor of the San Francisco 
"Chronicle," wrote an interesting and encompassing article for 
the Sunday issue of July 12. in which this young writer points 
to the better-homes movement and the stand taken by the Par- 
ent-Teachers Association. Quoting from Miss Connolly we 
find that : 

California claims a new distinction, it seems, according to a 
report coming to the Parent-Teacher Association headquarters. 
This state, with Georgia, according to the report, leads all 
other states in having parents who stay on the job watching 
out for their kiddies the whole year through. No vacations 
for parenthood, but watchfulness and care all the year around 
was adopted as a platform of the Xational Congress of Parents 
and Teachers in 1923, following the election of Mrs. Mar- 
garetta Willis Reeves of Philadelphia as president. At the 
same election. Mrs. Edgar L. De Arman of San Jose was chosen 
first vice-president. She is also junior past president of the 
California Congress. 

(Continued on Page lTi 






12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1925 



50 CENTS PER COPY 
Postage, U. S., 10 Cents. Canada and Foreign, 20 Cents 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Enclosed $ for which please send to my 

address copies' of DIAMOND JUBILEE 

EDITION OF SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Name 

Address 

Also mail copies direct to the following : 

Name 

Address 



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Address.. 



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Californians! 



WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE 
HISTORY OF YOUR GOLDEN STATE? 



The Diamond Jubilee 
Edition 

of the 

San Francisco 
News Letter 

will be published 

September 5, 1925 



112 PAGES 

Will Tie Devoted to an Historical Review of 
the Story of California. It Will Be Illustrated 
by the Finest Collection of Old Photographs 
in Existence, Depicting- Dramatic Incidents 
During the Pony Express and Vigilantes Days. 
Including- a Period From 1837 to 1925. 



Order copies now! 

The Edition Will Be Limited 



50c per copy 

Postage, U. S.. 10c 

Postage, Foreign, 20c 



lOur 60th Anniversary Number, Published in 1916, which con- 
tained a number of engravings that will be re-published in the 
Diamond Jubilee Edition, has had a ready sale at $10.00 per copy 
during the last four years.) 



July 18, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



*)ach car ojberaied\zA 
hj/ rc>I table 
cAourfeurs 
u/Jto Morou<fftly under- 
stand i/te/r Lus/ffoss 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Graystone 270 

1020 Tine Street 

Sau Francisco 



»*M§jSP« 



anTTtnn 



BY CABIN STEAMERS PROM 
NEW rORK 

Direct Soilings via Panama Canal 

THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

570 Mnrkn St., Son Franriioo 




San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES I 

Sim Frnnrliieo — Burllnjrame 

Wnl, 70.1 jjTS 



^**« 



T Na ;. PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete sat f sf ac- 
tion. There la a 
grade for every 
need Ask your 
__ printer or sta- 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street. San Francisco 





round trip 

Atlanta, Ga $109.35 

Boston, Mass 153.50 

Buffalo, N. Y.... 120.62 

Chicago, 111 86.00 

Cincinnati, O 106.30 

Dallas, Texas... 72.00 

Denver, Colo 64.00 

Des Moines, la.. 77.65 
Detroit, Mich.... 105.62 
Houston, Texas. 72.00 
Indianapolis, Ind. 99.24 
Jacksonville, Fla. 120.43 
Kansas City, Mo. 72.00 
Memphis, Tenn. . 85.15 
Minneapolis.Minn. 87.50 
Montreal, Que. . . 144.42 
New Orleans, La. 85.15 
New York, N. Y. 147.40 

Omaha, Neb 72.00 

Philadelphia, Pa. 144.92 
Quebec, P. Q.... 155.72 
St. Louis, Mo.. . 81.50 

Toronto, Ont 121.42 

Washington, D.C. 141.56 
and others 

Start Any Day — Return Limit Oct. 3 1st 

BRIDGING the distance across America the Santa 
Fe offers a wide choice of service and accomodations. Din- 
ing ca"S exclusively or meals at Fred Harvey station restaurants 
an 1 lunch rooms. Drawing-room Compartment and Section Pull- 
mans on all trains. Tourist cars Eas.bound daily effecting a saving 
oi approximately one-hali in sleeping car fares. 

See GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK en route. 

[A postcard will bring our illustrated folders and detailed information] 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices and Travel Bureaux 

601 Market Street and Market Street Ferry Depot, Tel. Sutter 7600 
SAN FRANCISCO 



back 

east. 

Santa Fe 



(I \kl \\|> 516 Fourth Slrrcl 

111 l)lh Slrrrl M\TI ROSV 

SAN JOSE 
15 Ea.t Santa Clara Slrrri 

A Splendid Party 

A lady v\ ho had given a dinner party 
met her doctor in the street the follow- 
ing day, and Stopped to speak to him. 

"I am SO sorry, doctor." she said. 
"thai you were not able to come to my 
dinner party last night : it would have 
di me J I 'ii gi " "I I" be there." 

"It has already done me good." he 
replied tersely. "I have just prescribed 
for three of the guests." — The Tatler. 



MIHIMRXTO BERKELEY 

lOMKStTMl .'III Unrr.il, Ayr. 

STOCKTON 

HI I ir-i Nalional Bank Bid.. 

"1 must see the doctor today. I don't 
like the lock of my wife." 

"That's an idea. I'll come with you, 
old man : 1 can't hear the sight of mine 
either." — Judge. 



The High Cost of Living 
Judge — You wretch! How could you 

murder a woman for a miserahle halt 

crown? 

Prisoner — Well, your honor, halt a 

crown here and half a crown there. - 

Le Hire. 



Solomon's 777th Wife — Sol, are you 
really and truly in love with me? 

Soli. m. hi — My dear, you are one in a 
thousand. 

And >he -nuggled closer. — Columbia 
Tester. 



Strategy 
"You are the most beautiful girl I 
ever kissed." he whispered to her. So 
of curse, after that, she did not dare 
ask him if she was the first. — Judge. 



Woman's intuition isn't so impres- 
sive when she is deciding which waj 
to turn in traffic. — Rochester Times- 
m. 



Physical Culturist— Do you take a 

shower in the morning? 
Another Nut— Yes : I always have 
grape fruit for breakfast. — Judge. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1925 




, notable feature of the present year is that t he e has 
A been an advance in the price of all staples of the pnn- 
cioal countries of the world. A large proportion of the 
articles King our imports show marked advances when 
measured by the prices paid in the countr.es from winch 
they are imported. 

F S McGinnis, assistant passenger traffic manager of 
the Southern Pacific Company, has been appointed traffic 
manager of the Company with headquarters at San Fran- 
cisco Mr. McGinnis succeeds to the position held b) J. 
H. R. Parsons, who retires from active service. 

* * , * 

Massachusetts was the first state to pass a law which 
assures that any person injured or the heirs of any person 
killed will receive some financial reimbursement for their in- 
jury or loss. It provides that no one can get a license un- 
less he has either deposited security or presented an in- 
surance policy of at least $5,000, to cover possible awards 
against him for injuries caused by his automobile. 

* * * 

Dr Don D. Lescohier, professor of economics at the 
University of Wisconsin, has undertaken to show the Com- 
monwealth Club a new method for dealing with the ques- 
tion of employment as distinguished from the hit-and-miss 
method in vogue at present. This comes under the head 
of the Industrial Relations section of the Commonwealth 

Club. 

* * * 

Gerard Swope, President of the General Electric Co., 
says, "Now we are beginning to understand the need for 
economic liberty— and both laborer and employer are com- 
ing to see each other's viewpoint." Very sensible and true. 

* * * 

Secretary of Labor, Davis, addressing the annual con- 
vention of the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Tin 
Workers at Pittsburgh, declared: "The employers see an 
injustice in having to pay for a full day's work when the 
actual job only takes an hour." He expressed a hope that 
the unions would ease up on the silly strictness of some 
of their rules and act in a give-and-take spirit. 

* * * 

The building permits mount continually higher. The 
American plan has, no doubt, had its share in the produc- 
ing of the state of things which is represented by figures 
like the following: First five months of 1924, $22,258,296; 
First five months of 1925, $22,556,617.^ No such figures 
appeared under the old closed shop regime. 

* * * 

Earthquake losses at Santa Barbara are not going to be 
as heavy as feared, according to the statement of L. B. 
Daniels, president of Seeley & Co.. general agents. Mr. 
Daniels says that while many of the buildings are damaged 
in the exterior, they are, in reality, not harmed to any 

great extent. 

* * * 

All records of the Western States Life were smashed for 
the second time this year, when the production for June to- 
talled $10,027,788. 'This is a gain of $3,015,535 over the 
previous record month of March for this company. 

* * * 

The effect of the modern methods of life insurance com- 
panies is illuminated by the statement of Haley Fiske, presi- 
dent of the Metropolitan Life when he says : "We believe 
we have saved 200,000 lives among our policy holders be- 
tween 1911 and 1924, over and above the saving which re- 
sulted in mortality decline among the general populace. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

A SS ets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fu'id 479,081.25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Hmcht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



J 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid In Cnpllnl $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Ollleei 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BICUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. (Ill Mil till) 

Mnnneer AMHt. Manager 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal 



Phone Hemlock 1082 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, AutomobMe Insurance 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer* of 

RIVETED STEEI, PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. FLUMES. 

PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 

Snn FranclNco, Calif. Ln» tnpt-l, ■*, Calif. 

444 Market St. R717 Santa Fe Avenue 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



July 18, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



1. 



GOLF 

(Continued from Page 10) 

Rod Guyett says that the evolution of man is from mi- 
crobe to monkey to man, and after that, back to microbe 

again. 

* * * 

Hugo Poheim says he does not evolute, but revolutes, 

when he is driving. 

* # * 

The "Descent of Man" was a favorite theme of Charles 
Darwin, but Al Ferreiria says he gets more kick out of the 

"Ascent of a Golfer." 

* * * , 

"It's a long tail that needs no twisting," says Claude 
Alexander when he played Courtenay Barter. 

* * * 

Just because Harry Speas likes cocoanut pie does not 
bear out the Darwinian theory. 

* * * 

If Andy knew as much about evolution as he does about 
revolutions, he could churn a buttermilk that would cure 

all ills. 

* * * 

"Taxicab" Smith was ruled out for trying to walk on 

all fours. 

* * * 

"Pop" Eisert announced that his tail was dragging the 
ground before the 16th hole was reached. 

* * * 

George Maltby, the Adonis of the Jungle, can't keep 
his eyes on the ball when there's a "fair" gallery. 

* * * 

Dr. McConnell finds his pleasure in watching the quad- 
rumana do their stuff on the links. 

* * * 

Hugh Tarzan McKevitt has been subpoenaed by Dar- 
row to appear at the Scope's trial as Exhibit "A." 

* * * 

After missing a six inch putt, Judge Eddie Shortal! was 
accused of jabbering like a Chimpanzee, but claimed he 
was cussin' in Gaelic, 

Bill Woodfield, the real estate juggler, denies he is a 

pithecanthropus erectus. 

* * * 

Harry McKenzie, the golfing gorilla, performed success- 
fully before the jury. 

* * * 

Ed Bernhard invented the "Baboon Brassie" shot. 

* * * 

Pete Gerhardt has declined l" perform before Harrnw. 
Malone. et al, on the grounds that he might incriminate 

himself. 

* * * 

Rudy llahenecht ^i\^ the average man makes enough 
of a monkey of himself without blaming it on hi> anci 

* * * 

Jack Houston, the "World's" Champion Golfer, has "Bry- 
anized" the Nineteenth llole. 

* * * 

Eaton McMillan did the ringtail glide around Judge Tim 
patrick and his educated mashie. 

* * * 

After watching Louie Ghiradelli's antics Frank 
announced his conversion to the Darwinian the 
» * * 

From the way George Leatherby handle I hi~ niblick, he 
must have thought he was pitching cocoanuts. 



At Marquard's 

After viewing the cabaret at Marquard's. on the corner 
of Geary and Mason streets, you come to the conclusion 
that the ten pretty girls who dance there must have been 
selected from some beauty show, while the music is superior 
to anything of its kind on the Pacific Coast. 

These ten little beauties take part in a series of college 
stunts, supposed to take place between the University of 
California and Stanford's, rowing, boxing and other games. 
Besides this, there is a wonderful quartette of male voices, 
and altogether, aside from the excellent cuisine which Mar- 
quard's has always been famous for, the features in this 
cabaret constitute a show which is worth in itself the price 
you pay for your dinner. 



"Just what do you think o' this new farm bill that's before 
the house Lem?" 

(After a long pause) — "Derned if I know what to think, 
Ez, don't know what I do think. I don't think I think any- 
thing about it." — Judge 



"What is life insurance, little Gagface?" 
"It's keepin' a man poor all his life so's he can die rich." — 
Brown Jug 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the**. 

VALLFY of the MOON 



Our Specially — "Sleaks With Mushrooms" 

Clean Room*, i !< m Linen, Clean Everything 



Famous Resorts and Mineral (\ 
Tanks From This Hold. 

Rates Exceptionally Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 



■yt'oier) Swimming 



FRANK SANUELIN 
Free Aula llu> Meets All Train; 



palace hotel 



F. W. SANUELIN 

earn Heat Throughout 

Telephone in Room* 




FETTERS' HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Mas- 
seur in attendance Healthful mineral waters; swimming 
pool. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Kates, $18 up. 
Write George Fetters. Mgr.. or Peck-Judah. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 



x JhosEKeni 



Shirts 

Pajamas 

Night Robes 



r Jhos£Keai 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
JsKrvKN^ street Phone Kearny 3714 



, GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

j Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. ISth and 19th Sts.. j 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club. 

EVERY motorist has not had the 
artistic training necessary to the 
appreciation of what constitutes beauty 
in landscape. Nevertheless, the aver- 
age tourist in the course of his travels 
unconsciously develops an artistic per- 
ception whether he is aware of this 
subtle development in his mentality or 
not. 

California offers unlimited oppor- 
tunities for the cultivation of artistic 
perception and the colors of her roll- 
ing hills and the wild floweis of her 
meadows form only one of the fields of 
art within the state. Color apprecia- 
tion is one of the necessary back- 
grounds to a thorough appreciation of 
touring in California. If you can de- 
velop this sense so necessary to an mi ■ 
derstanding of the beauty of California, 
you will have added a great deal to the 
enjoyment which you seek out on the 
open road and at the same time you 
will be developing those finer instincts 
of character which add a great deal to 
the pleasure of life itself. 

The remarkable configuration of 
California is one reason of the diversi- 
fied appeal of its scenery. The forest, 
the heavy growth of its canyons and 
dells, of its hillsides and mountain soli- 
tudes, is another element in the univer- 
sal appeal possessed by this wonderful 
state. But these two features of the 



California landscape do not form the 
entire picture for the artistic eye. They 
may be prominently in the foreground, 
they may form a great portion of the 
vista included within the range of vis- 
ion, but the inspiring background pre- 
sented by sea or lake and sky, the stu- 
pendous cloud effects of the high Sierra 
or the fleecy folds that garb the gaunt 
shoulders of Tamalpais and Diablo — 
these add to the picture that element of 
wonder which, since the days of the ab- 
original inhabitants, have given to Cali- 
fornia an atmosphere of romance that 
imparts the spark of life to the majestic 
scene. 

Follow the Gypsy Trail in California 
with an eye to the picturesque. An- 
swer the call of the open road like a 
true adventurer constantly on the alert 
for new beauties in field and hill. Go 
forth, awake to the marvels of nature's 
handiwork, and you will find a new en- 
joyment in the use of a motor car, a 
new interest in the fleeting miles over 
the concrete ribbons of road, a broader 
perspective of nature and nature's 
moods and a saner vision of the rela- 
tive importance of the practical things 
of life. 



Auto Club Appointed as Information 
Bureau 

The National Automobile Club has 
been advised of its appointment as the 
official hotels and information bureau 
for the California Association of In- 
surance Agents which is to hold its an- 
nual convention in San Francisco, Sep- 
tember 17. IS and 19. 

It is expected that fully one thousand 
local insurance agents from all points 
in the State of California will attend 
the annual conference which is one of 
the most important gatherings of its 
kind in the United States in that its 
deliberations are closely related to the 
scope and methods of protecting the 
property owners of the state in the va- 
rious forms of coverage. 

The responsibility of making the 
hotel accommodations, together with 
all other necessary reservations for the 
attending delegates, has been accepted 
by the National Automobile Club as a 
part of its service to its members and 
its announced policy of extending to 
visitors the accommodations of the 
club. In addition the local agents have 
been advised that each of the club's 
branch offices which are located in Los 
Angeles. Fresno, Stockton, Oakland, 
Sacramento, San Diego and Bakers- 
field have been notified to extend to 
the local agents of those cities the fa- 



cilities of the club in the event that 
they are motoring to the convention. 
The National Automobile Club will 
establish an information booth in the 
Palace Hotel during the convention. 



Lawn Fete at Agua Caliente 

What promises to be the social event 
of the season will be held in the ro- 
tunda of the Agua Caliente Springs 
Hotel at Agua Caliente, Calif., from 
2 to 5 p. m., Wednesday. July 29th, 
when the ladies of the Sonoma Valley 
Improvement Club will hold a Lawn 
Fete and Promenade Concert. 

The beautiful doll. Lula Vallejo 
Emparan, now shown in the lobby of 
the hotel, with her hope chest of lovely 
clothes, will be awarded to some lucky 
girl. 

The proceeds of this affair will be 
used in paying the mortgage on the 
Community House of the Improve- 
ment Club and is a worthy cause. 

Everyone is invited to attend and 
enjoy the splendid music to be fur- 
nished by a concert orchestra from 
Santa Rosa. 

Attention Club Members! 

Have 
You 

Sampled 
a 
Club 
Business 
Lunch 
at 
SINGLE- 
TON'S 
ALLEY 

CAT 
LUNCH 
INN? 
Delicious, Dainty and Decidedly Different. 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



me 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
*■ IhencwHEXEON 
process. 




ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 
SAN FIIANCISCO 



Look for the 
GREEN and 
WHITE 
SIGN 



GENERAL 

GASOLINE & 
LUBRICANTS 



Meet Your 
General 
Dealer Today 



July 18, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on Used Cars 



ALMOST any automobile is a "real good car" nowadays. 
That is, any new car is a real good automobile. You can 
never be sure about used cars. There are more abused crooked 
sixes than there are straight eights. This condition can be laid 
at the garage doors of owners, who think grease is a commodity 
used solely by cooks and cold cream manufacturers. Used cars 
are, in most cases, abused cars, unless they are purchased from 
regular dealers, who believe that a motor is an absolutely indis- 
pensable accessory to an automobile. When a used car is pur- 
chased from a wildcat speculator, it may safely be said that the 
bargain will be composed mostly of molasses, crude oil and 
sand, to keep the rattles and groans out, until the machine is 
out of the used car barn and into the repair shop. 

Used cars, not dolled up to sell, have the most remarkable 
body finishes known today. Acids and cleansing powders have 
no effect, because there is no paint or enamel connected with 
them. They form the shell game of motordom. You never know 
what's under the hood until you fork over the money. City 
slickers as well as Reubens bite on the slick salesmen's lines. 
As a result, Ponzi is out-financed and the meaning of "bunk" 
made clear. 

There are good used cars as well as bad ones. Quality 
must, in all cases, be backed by a trademark or an "Honest 
Jim" name. Americans read the ads. The ads are signed 
with the manufacturers' names and on worth of products put 
on the market the makers' names depend. Salt, tacks, ice. 
sugar, rat poison or used cars all must have a name or a mark 
behind them. With new purchases, one label is sufficient, but 
it's different with automobiles that have served their first or 
fourth owner and looking for another. 

Every new automobile bears from live to ten or more trade- 
marks — one each for its electrical system, body, spark plugs, 
clutch, bumpers and tires. Each of these lesser parts carry 
the sign of some company and arc. in the aggregate, subordi- 
nated to the most conspicuous name plate, usually located on 
the radiator shell. Obviously, when a car has satisfied the 
needs of one motorist ami has been discarded in Favor -of a 
new vehicle, the original maker- can't he held responsible for 
faults brought about by eccentric driving and. since Americans 
insist on some backing, a well known and reputable used car 
dealer's name is as essential as -alt in the soup. 

I lave you ever stopped to realize that ever) one of the thou 
-amis of cars which you pass (or pa-s you) daily arc use! 
cars — that, sooner or filer, they are all going he put on sale, 
at some place, for some price: Win 's y ing to -ell the best 
ones, in the best condition' Win. the firms that advertise, of 
course. The smaller fry take I heir cans to empty lo'S an 1 
lake what the) can get, from those who get what they can, for 
from $35 up. 

Gasoline nun care what it is poured into, hut it has no kick 
in sonic car-. That's all the good u > 

A man may not he able to look a used car in the mouth, hut 
he can. at least, bu) from a dealer that can It ok him in die eve. 
I'hc "looking" can he done either per-, nally or through adver- 
tising. 

People hate to tramp the town looking for place- to live, 
let alone used cars. 

Quality is more than paint-. K 

All of which leads to a natural query, namely: "What are 
We going to do when used aeroplanes an I dirigibles arc put ..n 
the market? If everyone trades in hi- or her automobile for 
an airship, who'- going to buy used cars? I should say. the 
timid soul- who are a'-cairt of automobiles now. 

Anyway it will take a lot more to keep an aer. pi me up than 
r does to keep an ant. mobile. The used c future is. 

therefore, sure of a purchaser. SO Far as mi -t ol US ;u 
eeri led. 



THE BRAVE AND THE FAIR 

(Continued from Page 11) 

.Mrs. De Annan has waged an enthusiastic campaign in Cali- 
fornia on the adopted platform theme and wherever she has 
addresseil Mothers' Congress and P.-T. A. members, has urged 
that vacations and teachers may come and go, but that parents 
are the big fixed reality of kiddies' lives. 
* * * 

"Much study, little talk!" Such is the recommendation of 
Mrs. Minna McGauley, new head of the international relations 
department of the California Federation of Women's Clubs. 
Mrs. McGauley is meeting, along with fifty-six other depart- 
ment and division heads of the federation, in conference over 
the week-end with Dr. Mariana Bertola to outline the federa- 
tion program for the year 1925-26. She declares that in her 
opinion California women should approach the international 
relations question with well-informed, unbiased minds. 




14-MlL.E Mm -l 
Uncle Tom's Cabin 



RESTAURANT 

OPEN 8:0ff A. M. TO 11:00 P. M. 

unsurpassed cuisine 
Carl Leonhardt 

formerly of 
Golden Cute Park Casino 



For Three Generations We Have Kept Up-to-date 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry* 1 



250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 



'Phone Market 916 



TRADE MARh. -_- — — ~ f 

il|C Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — ' 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 



4fS2 Bryant St., San Francisco 



122 Center St., Los Angeles 




II III GR WtY ST. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



Till.. I'UANKI.IN MHS 

Metal Work \|i|nr- 
t ;, i II i II u la * •■ ttiiiin- 

btlca — Oxi - \ it- it 1,-n i- 
Urlilinc — lll:nk- 
* in i I l-.ifiK. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
IIAVI" \<>l 11 r\!t« WASHBD .\r> BRKASKD 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

ftiitrn. Kit* pf-r rlny: $7.r,tt per month 

FH"> tvS 243 

M\ Floor* for *rrvlrr nnd *» t o r n c «■ of \ n lomotii lent 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1925 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. No. 41,989. 
Dept. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
"W. J. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
John Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court? of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of Pan Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within four (4) 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice to the said administrator, at his office, 
858 Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
ornia, which said last-named office the under- 
signed selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of John 
Oliver, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, July 7, 
1925. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY, 
Attorneys for Administrator. 



875 Folsom St. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 
Simonds Entertain With 
Delightful Dinner Party 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Simonds, whose 
beautiful home in Berkeley in the ex- 
clusive "Thousand Oaks" district, is 
often the scene for interesting assem- 
blages, gave a dinner party last Satur- 
day night in compliment to Mrs. L. S. 
Larkey and her two sons of Piedmont, 
now en route to Europe, where Dr. L. 
S. Larkey will attend Oxford Univer- 
sity. 

The Simonds mansion is one of the 
distinctive residences in Berkeley and 
reflects the taste and high discrimina- 
tion of both Mrs. Grace Simonds and 
Mr. Ray Simonds. 

Prominent lawyers -including Daniel 
J. Ryan, were among the guests at 
the Simonds dinner party. Dancing in 
the spacious hallway of the magnifi- 
cent home interspersed the dinner. 
Music and intellectual concourse as 
well as festivities were a part of the 
most delightful home gathering. 

* * * 

Mrs. Harry B. Arnold, Jr., of Sacra- 
mento, and young Harry Arnold, III 
and Miss Florine Robison of San 
Mateo, have been spending a few 
weeks at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. 
B. Arnold, Sr., Oakland, in the Lake 
Merritt district. Harry Arnold, Jr. of 
the capital city joined the Arnold party 
over the week-end. 

* * * 

Pen League Women 

The literary department of the San 
Francisco branch, League of American 
Pen Women, will have its opening ses- 
sion on Wednesday, July 22, at 3 p. m. 
The meeting will be held in Chickerintj 
Recital Hall, 230 Post Street, and will 
be the first of the newly organized de- 
partment. It will also be a joint meet- 
ing of the executive and advisory 
boards of the Salon of International 
Art and the League of American Pen 
Women. Mrs. Helen W. Bromfield is 
department chairman. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Flood, who 
make their home at the Fairmont 
Hotel, have been entertaining their 
son, Mr. Ormond Flood and his wife 
this past week. The young couple mo- 
tored to this city from the South, where 
Ormond Flood has built an artistic 
home. 

* * * 

Miss Geneve Shaffer, writer, society 
girl, world traveler and prominent real- 
tor of San Francisco, has just returned 
from a visit to Denver, where she was 
the official delegate to the national con- 
vention of realtors. Miss Shaffer was 
the only woman represented on the 
board, where she was included in dis- 
cussions of nation-wide importance in 
regard to real estate. 




~fhe bettor it gets- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6B54 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cups were nerved at the Pan- 
ama Paclflo International Exposition 



No. U6.330 

SUMMONS 

In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint 
filed in the office of the County Clerk of said 
City and County. 

Frederick Marriott, Plaintiff, vs. N. F. Wil- 
son, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to: N. F. Wilson, Defendant. 

You are hereby directed to appear and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 
above, brought against you in the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, within 
ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and County; 
or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money 
or damages demanded in the complaint as 
arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for any other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the Su- 
perior Court at the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California. 

Dated April 30, 1924. 

[Seal] H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAGNKTTM.. 

Deputy Clerk. 

AUSTIN LEWIS, Attorney for Plaintiff. 473 
Mills Building, San Francisco. California. 



Phone Sutter 3278 




Wm. Herbst & Company 




(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 




Clock makers and Watchmakers 




CHIME. ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 




AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 




200 Pont Street at Grant Avenue 




San Franclaco, Calif. 




Call and Deliver in San Francitco, Alameda 




and San Mateo Counties 





WHERE TO DINE 



CAFE MARQUARD 



Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 



Nightly 

Jack Holland and Miss Jean Barry 

in 

REVUE 

A. Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 7 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 





*iSS 



3.i4 Sutthr St. 



tXeanorS 



445 Powell St., 

San Francisco 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchant's lunch 11 a. in. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Frivate din- 
ing r ns for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



Douglas 7118 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



r 
j 








BLANCO' 


S 






1 


1 


oT'nrrt 


11 nnd 


l.nrkln Street* 


Ph 


onf 


Franklin [ 


! 




NO vis 


Ito 


r should leave the city wi 
in the finest cafe in Amei 


thout 
ica 


din 


ng 






l.tiiM'lir 

l> r. 

Dinner, 


in III 
Mock 
Siintln 


an 
it 


nys - - 
nnd lli'tiiiriT. 


_ 


_ 


_ 


75c j 
• 1.30 * 
•1.73 | 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



j M II 



ir,l \n-iuir, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. tO 2:00 p. m. 

p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVEIU MOMVU 

Half lllork from Highway 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day is 
taking very good care of them, Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles tbs»* will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleedf Call In today 
nnd talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks olT all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. H0AGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street tat Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone C.aiflihl 335 



SPECIAI 



1STS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridget*! 
I'oroeluiii Work nnd Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters 01 St. Dominic 








A WARNING! 




Eye strain, headache. die«neS9, nausea, nervousness 


, cat- 


Bract, (inutile vision, filiating spots, poor memory, 


astig- 


matilm, erosi eves, ntvcs, iii-i-liiir;iitie or watery 


eyes, 


swoolen or crusty eyelids, itchy or inflamed eyes, far 


ighl- 


and nearsightedness, or if one eve is weaker than the 


other 


these symptoms should receive immediate care and 


at ten- 


lion, Wc advise that you consult 





George Mayerle, Optometrist 

Optical Practice 960 Market Strt 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of .London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5S16 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

<"PAUL ELDER'S 

A\D PAIL ELDER'S LIIIRARV 



239 Post Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 



DR. B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 

Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell Hours 9 U 4 

San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 



............... ....--,-,..-.....-...-.... ■■■-*> 


p 


arisian 


Dyein 


£ 


and 


Cleaning 




Soils Pressed 


Bv Hand Only- 


Sim 


I ,11.-1 For 


ind Delivered 






MME. M. 


s. 


E. LEE 








Parisian Dvring and Cleaning 




In 


Po«t Street 
k mctM.i Hotel 








Sin FUNCUGO 
Phone Franklin 2310 
——■-■ — — -.-»-- - ■— 4 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes. Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 



130 Russ St. 



Phone Hemlock 170 



San Francisco 



The World 

IN ROTAGRAVURE 



Beautiful photographic studies 
from all corners of the earth 
are assembled for your enter- 
tainment in The Sunday Chron- 
icle Rotagravure. The most in- 
teresting figures in the news — 
whether leaders of world-poli- 
tics — dainty danseuses in char- 
acteristic poses — or heroes of 
daring air flights — celebrities in 
all ranks of life are to be found 
in this beautiful section of 
photographic art. See it every 
week. The 



&m iffrattrisni 

|| (Sfymadt 

ROTAGRAVURE 



Time 




Card 



THIS DEI* END A mi; AUTOMOBILE FERRY Route «hUtn 
mitt itrists (hi* slmrii-si .-iiiil most direct mean* »*( tran-<portn- 
i in ii from Oakland, Snn l-Ynnclaco, and all pnlntN Month, to 
\ "nlli-j". Sncromenln, Sonuiun. Napa nnd Lake Countk'N and 
nil point* north. 

liilomohlle Fare. .".%■■: \ilutis, 10c; Children, Cc. 
The lowest ferry rate* on San FrnnclNCO Ray. 



I 



Leave O 


ikland 


111 


Leave 


Vnllejo 


Side 


at 




O 




Sii 


e at 


"SHOUT 


-WAY" 




MORROW COVE 


A.M. 




P.M. 


a. 


A.M. 




P.M. 


t0:00 




2:40 


Ill 


t5:45 




2:20 


(1:30 




3:00 


CO 


0:15 




2:40 


7:00 




3:20 




0:45 




3:00 


7:30 




3:40 


111 


7:15 




3:20 


8:00 




4:00 


(- 


7:45 




3:40 


8:20 




4:20 


3 


8:20 




4:00 


8:40 




4:40 


Z 


8:40 




4:20 


9:00 




5:00 




0:00 




4:40 


8 120 




5:20 


E 


0:20 




5:00 


0:40 




5:40 




0:40 




5:20 


10:00 




0:00 


X 


10:00 




5:40 


10:20 




0:20 




10:20 




0:00 


10:40 




0:40 


1 


10:40 




0:20 


1 1 :00 




7:00 


1 

> 
< 


1 1 :00 




0:40 


11:20 




7:20 


1 1 :20 




7 :00 


11:40 




7:40 


11:40 




7:20 


NOO\ 




8:00 


5 


NOON 




7:45 


12:00 




8:30 




12:00 




8:15 


P.M. 




0:00 


h 


P.M. 




8:45 


12:20 




0:30 


K 


12:20 




0:15 


12:40 




10:00 


O 


12:40 




0:15 


1:00 




10:30 


I 


1:00 




10:15 


1:20 




1 1 :00 


(0 


1:20 




10:45 


1:40 




• 1 1 :30 




1:40 




•11:15 


2:00 




•12:O0 


III 


2:00 




•11:15 


2:20 




* 1 2 :30 
•1:00 


X 






•12:15 
•12:45 



•Satiirilii-r*. Sunday*!. Holidn-fH — Extra TrlpH Durlnic Hem j 
Trnllic. fSiindn-fN nnd IfnlldnvN only. 

A VEX J. IIWFOIII). Pre*, nnd fien. Mcr. 



SAVE MONEY! 

Motorists Should Travel Via 

Golden Gate Ferry 

Between 

Sausalito a/id San Francisco 

Summer Schedule Now Effective 



Serving the Southwest 

— through daily service via EI Paso. San An- 
tonio. Houston to New Orleans -the !\eiv 

Sunset Limited 



Luxurious travel accommodations — elul> ear; 
standard sleepers: observation car: barber, 
valet, maid; shower-baths. 

And Southern Pacific dining ear service na- 
tional standard in transportation catering. 

See, this way, Apache trail of Arizona. 

Connects at New Orleans with Southern Pacific 
ocean steamers to New York and with trains 
north and east. 



For fares, reservations, find full infor- 
mation, ask any agent 



Back East 

low roundtrip sum- 
mer excursion fares 
in effect. October 31 
return limit. 



FOUR FAST BOATS 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 




A. 0. Stewart 
President 



Harry E. Speas 
Vice-Pres. and Gcnl. Mgr, 



Southern Pacific Lines 



Ferry Station 65 Geary Street Third St. Station 
' ''Or Phone SUTTER 4000 



~» ■ 



{Vtf~ 




SAN FRANCISCO 



i— — 

SATURDAY, JULY 25th, 1925 



LOS ANGELES 




"Like <i stately shift, 
with all her bravery 
on, 

And tackle trim, saif.\ 
filled and streamers 
ving" 



From the painting by Charles It. Grant, vek*St / 
ot battle ship* me treating an international interest. 
Mr. Grant is nn<a- vntk the American Fleet 
on its trip around the iLorlJ. 



50 CENTS PER COPY 
Postage, U. S., 10 Cents. Canada and Foreign, 20 Cents 



Name 

Address. 



Name 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Enclosed $ for which please send to my 

address copies of DIAMOND JUBILEE 

EDITION OF SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Name 

Address 

Also mail copies direct to the following: 

Name 

Address 



Thi 



Diamond Jubilee 

Edition 

of the 

San Francisco 
News Letter 

will be published 

September 5, 1925 

112 PAGES 

Will Be Devoted to an Historical Review of 
the Story of California. It Will Be Illustrated 
by the Finest Collection of Old Photographs 
in Existence, Depicting Dramatic Incidents 
During the Pony Express and Vigilantes Days. 
Including a Period From 1837 to 1925. 



Order copies now! 

The Edition Will Be Limited 



50c per copy 

Postage, U. S.. 10c 

I '« istage, Foreign, 21 lc 



{Our 60;A Anniversary Number, Published in 1916, which con- 
tained a number of engravings ibm will be re-published in the 
Diamond Jubilee Edition, has bad a ready sale at S 10.00 per copy 
during tbe last jour years. ' 




EtUblltltcd July 20. 1&M 

SAN F^^Cj5t© 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 



The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1S56, 
Tr From 1884 to 19 9 5 Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 2 
ssii'tfer 8535 Entered at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matte 
'England Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. $5.00. * 



by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 
London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill. E. C. London, 
Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $G.OO. 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., JULY 25, 1925 



No. 4 



MONKEY MODES 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



— Far be it from the intention of the humble writer of 
this page to attempt to clash wits with such intellects as are 
evidenced in the persons of William Jennings Bryan, or John 
Thomas Scopes, or Clarence Darrow, or Judge John T. Raul- 
ston, or any of the notables in the recent Dayton trial, but 
we hereupon take this occasion to rise and remark that 

* * * 

— Whether or not we are literally descended frtmi the si- 
mian race, or whether or not, it will, in the future, lie writ- 
ten into the U. S. Constitution as a crime to believe in evo- 
lution, there have been groups of humans at all times in our 
history, who have undoubtedly acted in a monkeyish man- 
ner. 

* * * 

— We have in mind those sycophantic people who. no- 
ticing some idiosvncracv in the manner, or walk or dress 
or speech of their social Superiors, ape that peculiarity, even 
when it is the natural sequence of some deformity. 

* * * 

— Quite often the fashion whose inception has been 
brought about by the misfortune of so-called "higher UpS," 
has been a passing frivolous one. that leaves no mischief 
in its wake; but again, there have been certain of these 
"monkey modes" that have a harmful and lasting tendency. 

* * * 

— It was a titled European woman, a great lover of horses, 
who. having a crooked spine, always rode in a side saddle 
to bide her deformity. And so, of course, equestriennes 
sat their steeds in this manner through man) generations, 
until these latter years, when a sensible Western woman 

broke away from Style and silly tradition, and rode her 

mount ;b it should always have been ridden. 

* * * 

But women who rotle habitually in the aforesaid lop- 
sided manner, sometimes became afflicted with the very 
complaint which the instigator of this mode of riding suf- 
fered from, and tried to conceal. 

* * * 

— A lady of the royal family of England has always 
walked with a limp. For years, when she was in the zenith 
of her court life and social power, women of the nobility 
and of the smart set, navigated as though was 

shorter than it really ought to be." No doubt in time this 
foolish affectation became a necessity. Going even farther 
and deeper, who can tell but what this assumed deformity 
had a deleterious effect upon their ofNpr 



— In the days of our grandmothers, the "Grecian Bend" 
was milady's fashionable mode of carriage. Who started 
this unnatural carriage, deponent sayeth not, but a lively 
imagination might lay it on the round shoulders of one of 
the models of Phidias, who sculptored the aristocrats of 
ancient Greece. Whatever human agency conceived it, 
it ended in spoiling the pretty figure of many an American 
woman who should have shown better sense. 

* * * 

— Only a 'few years ago the "debutante slouch" hunched 
the youthful backs of American society buds, caved in their 
little breasts and otherwise damaged their tender and grow- 
ing forms. No doubt a case of plain "stooped shoulders" 
of some anemic society girl, the silly little flappers of those 
days took up this manner of carrying themselves with 
avidity, until it looked as if the whole "rising generation" 
was to be a race of hunchbacks. 

* * * 

— Whenever the lit le Prince Charming of England I'm *s il 
i . to 'i e his hankie oftener than usual, all the swag- 
ger set of London begins to sniffle. 

The time may come when his frequent falls from his horse 
will be regarded as a gymnastic accomplishment, and the 
countryside will be eloquent with riders and their teachers. 
the former striving to get every little movement through which 
the Prince evolutes in hi- peregrinations on and off his mount. 

* * * 

— If a social leader should be afflicted with the St. Vitus 

dance, no doubt this disease woul I beo me so popular that a 

person moving and having his being in a ci mpose 1 and natural 
way, would be unique ami ng those who believe they are of a 
superior breed. * * * 

When P.ritish society emulated the example of Oscar 
Wilde, in wearing a mons'rous -tin flower in its button-hole, 
it chose to copy the leas) offensive of his qualities. 

* * * 

— We remember a masculine member of the elite of San 
Francisco who was the unfortunate possess r of a squint. 
We have been told that a number of Beau I'.rummels of the 
old town practised for hours before their mirrors, frying to 

acquire this peculiarity, with more or less succ< 

* * * 

— And now comes the wife of our President, whose long, 

rwing has been remarke I in the daily press, and 

which particular method of movement we recommend 
gentle readers, providing they have I ng !ts. r s. ( Itherwise, it 
might be a hazardous undertaking, shi uld i ne be the owner of 
rt an I stumpy nether liml 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 25. 1925 




Some of our distinguished 
Institute of Pacific Relations fellow citizens, who are 

afraid that the next war 
will break out in the Pacific, having the notion of heading 
off the v-ar devils, have been holding a conference at Hono- 
lulu. This holding of conferences, a modern, almost a post- 
war malady, being one of the ways in which "the good, the 
true and the beautiful" is upheld in modern life. 

There was enough talent at the meeting to run a small 
universe — the men, all of them practically, had more than 
a fair share of brains ; with a great deal of distinction and 
very noble hearts. What did they do? 

Well, in the first place they talked. The reports say "it 
accomplished its purpose of bringing together for unofficial 
and unhampered expression of opinion, and exchange of 
ideas leading spirits of different countries." So it would 
seem to be undeniable that they talked. Dr. Ray Lyman 
Wilbur, President of Stanford University, who took part 
in the discussion, also says that the "institute is pointing 
the way towards a solution of the many vexing problems 
and towards peaceful understanding and co-operation." 

It is one of the remarkable and distinguishing features of 
gatherings like this that they always point a way as well as 
talk. They sound very dramatic ; in reality they are not. 
When one gets to the bottom one finds that, after all, the 
real work is something small, relatively speaking, and prac- 
tical. Thus Dr. Wilbur says that the chief work of the in- 
stitute is "research and promulgation of facts relating to 
race relations and prejudices in the Pacific laboratories, 
notably Hawaii." So, after all, our institute with the high 
sounding name comes out of the clouds, talks and decides 
to investigate the race-relations of Hawaii, a very useful 
and practical thing, which it will undoubtedly make a good 
job of. All the same, we are disappointed ; we thought it 
would do more than that. 



As we have all been made 
The Village Drug Store aware recently the village drug 

store plays a most important 
part in the public affairs of a large part of this country. It 
was within its hospitable doors on a Sunday evening that 
the prosecution at Dayton, Tennessee, was hatched and 
where the doors were opened upon the mentality of the 
American rustic. All over the country we find the drug- 
store influence. It is from the drug store that opinions is- 
sue, which have made the name of Babbitt and the con- 
tours of Main Street familiar to the world. 

The whole country bears some marks of the drug store. 
The flavor of village gossip permeates the whole community 
just as a slight variation from style will set the villager gap- 
ing with hostile astonishment, so, anything that varies from 
type at all provokes the kind of chattering dismay with 
which the drug store rustics greeted knickerbockers only 
very few years ago. 

We approach so many problems just in that way, the 
guffaw-way, of the rustic. We look at matters from the 
point of view of our likes and dislikes rather than from any 
rational angle and the result is just this sort of thing that 
is going on at Dayton. Not that our rustics are any worse 
than other rustics; the same thing would happen anywhere 
that the same set of people were in evidence. Of course, 
it is our fate that this is the only country where the drug- 
store philosophers are in evidence. That fact produces queer 



results sometimes ; but on the whole it makes for good. We 
do get an expression of our real selves and -not merely the 
more cultured part of ourselves as happens in nearly all 
other places. So that if drug-store philosophy is occasion- 
ally irritatingly vulgar, it is quite inseparable from dem- 
ocracy, and after all, is not such a great price to pay. 



Of course, it is a well known and es- 
Political Honesty tablished fact that the tone of the 

herd, that is to say of the mass, nation- 
ally, as a state, as a municipality, or in any other collective 
capacity, is inferior to the average tone of the individuals 
composing it. For example, a mob will always, as a mob, 
do things which the members would not do individually. 
The same rule applies to politics, to international politics, 
just as much as to local. That is to say nations, as nations, 
will take ethical attitudes from which the gentlemen, who 
act as representatives, would utterly shrink as individuals. 
We have had a recent example in the case of Belgium. We 
learn that the Washington government is looking coldly on 
the proposition of Belgium that Germany should be held 
responsible for at least a portion of the war debt due from 
Belgium to this country. We should say so. Yet we find 
the Belgian foreign minister urging just that point and 
raising the contention that Belgium was relieved of respon- 
sibility for her war debt by reason of a special provision of 
the Versailles Treaty, which provided that Belgium should 
be reimbursed by Germany in that amount. But the Wash- 
ington government has already taken the position that it 
could not assent to a substitution of Germany liability. 

Now, here is a nation to which the United States has in 
particular been a friend and a deliverer. When the tide of 
famine rolled over her. our ships took her aid, our young 
men went to her assistance, our best gave of their best, and 
on her we poured money like water. Now, that same na- 
tion wishes to ignore the benefit and evade payment. Is 
it not true that the tone of the herd is low? 



United States and China 



It will come as a matter of 
surprise to most people to 
learn that the United States has 
contributed more to the educational and social progress of 
China than any other people. Xot that there should be any sur- 
prise for, after all, we do try our blundering best as a people 
to do what seems best for the advancement of the world. True 
enough, we make many mistakes and very often are quite ridic- 
ulous, but that comes of our ignorance. Our heart is all right, 
but we do lack experience. 

However. American religious and philanthropic organizations 
contribute $10,000,000 yearly to hospitals, education, social 
service and missionary enterprise. We do not quite know what 
the proportions of these various donations are, how much goes 
to purely religious propaganda and how much to social sen ice, 
and it seems difficult to get the information. The Rockefeller 
Foundation has a splendid hospital at Pekin and it has per- 
formed wonders for the Chinese. 

Of course, all of these social ameliorative contributions are 
bm a bagatelle compared with the amount of American money 
which has been invested in industrial and commercial enter- 
prises and some of which is already beginning to bear profit- 
able fruit. 

Such investments must, as far as possible, be protected. But 
the best protection to American investments in China as any 
where else, is the good will of the people among whom the in- 
vestments are made. We have referred to the philanthropic 
efforts of our countrymen merely to show that we have, by our 
beneficence, laid what should be a solid foundation of friend- 
ship and respect for us among the Chinese. This will be of 
great help to us when the storm, which so ponderously 
threatens, reallv breaks. 



25, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



We have been insisting for some 
Embarcadero Traffic time that the condition of the Km 
barcadero, as regards traffic along 
its entire length, is one of the most pressing of our local 
problems. Others are now taking np the matter. We refer 
to our esteemed contemporary, "The Recorder," in particu- 
lar. That paper has now come out with an editorial which 
takes precisely the view of the situation which we have 
stressed. 

The fact is that it has been known for many years that 
transportation facilities on the Embarcadero were utterly 
inadequate and the matter has been up for public discus- 
sion during a large portion of that time. No progress has, 
however, been made. There are still no facilities for the 
transportation of citizens or visitors along the length of 
three miles of this most important traffic thoroughfare in 
the city. 

In 1917 City Engineer O'Shaughnessy pointed out the 
necessity of a bus line on the Embarcadero running from 
the foot of Hyde Street to the Southern Pacific terminal 
at Third and Townsend and there was an offer to subsidize 
the line to the amount of $18,000 a year. 

The City Engineer, the Board of Harbor Commissioners, 
the people who use the Embarcadero and the business in- 
terests involved, were a unit on the proposition, yet no pro- 
gress has been made and the Board of Supervisors has 
been quite supine in the matter. 

All this we have pointed out before. We are glad that 
others are beginning to see the matter from the same point 
of view, and we hope and anticipate action. The present 
condition is burdensome, ridiculous and really intolerable in 
a city of the importance of San Francisco. 



bration is now fully assured through a communication just 
received by Brigadier General Thornwell Mullally, Res., 
chairman of the Army and Navy Participation Com- 
mittee, from Major General Charles T. Menoher, command- 
ing officer of the Ninth Corps Area at the Presidio of San 
Francisco. 

General Menoher's advices confirmed the fact that the 
War Department at Washington is heartily in sympathy 
with California's plans to celebrate fittingly the seventh- 
fifth anniversary of this state's admission to the Union, 
and that the Jubilee's Army and Navy Participation Com- 
mittee may count upon the army's hearty and active co- 
operation. 

Elaborate arrangements are accordingly being made for 
a large number of army airplanes to make exhibition and 
practice flights from Crissy Field at the Presidio, manned 
by all the crack army aviators available for this great 
occasion. Present indications are that these will include 
all or the major portion of the round-the-world fliers, who 
covered themselves and our country with so much glory 
last year by circling the globe in army planes, the first 
time this remarkable feat was ever accomplished by air. 

The Army and Navy Participation 'Committee is now 
making vigorous efforts to assure the start from San Fran- 
cisco of the navy airplane non-stop flight to Hawaii on or 
about the opening day of the Jubilee period; also to in- 
duce the Navy Department to have the Shenandoah here 
during the celebration. If this great dirigible comes, the 
tender "Patoka," which is equipped with the necessary 
mooring mast, will also lie assigned to this port, or a suit- 
able mast may be erected by the government for this pur- 
pose. 



The restoration of the Franciscan 
Restore the Mission Mission at Santa Barbara is an im- 

perative duty upon the citizens of 
this community. The mission was one of the finest of the 
chain which Junipero Serra had planted throughout the 
state, on the coast trail between Los Angeles and Verba 
Buena. It was not, in all respects, the finest, but at the 
present time it has better survived the ill-treatment and 
neglect, which have been the portion of the missions ever 
since the secularization act was passed by the Mexican 

government, prior to the American occupation. 

The recent earthquake had a very destructive effect upon 
the buildings according to Father Augustine. < >. F. M.. 
father superior of the mis-ion. The living quarters of the 
padres were entirely destroyed and they are now living 
in I lie mission gardens. Service- also must be held in the 
gardens till there is rebuilding done, as the church is un- 
safe, There had been quite a destructive earthquake in 
1812 from which the mis-ion had suffered. Vs a result the 
building was buttressed heavily. The recent earthquake 
has cracked the buttresses. The outer wall, which with 
its original archways was the distinguishing glory of the 
mission, has been badly damaged. 

Father Augustine is asking for funds for restoration. 
He should meet with a read\ am response. The 

mission is so involved in the slate history, it is so beauti- 
ful an ornament to the community and such a center ot 
loveliness and i:- very existence gives a certain distinction 
to the whole state, a misfortune to the mission, to any oi 
the missions which remain, in fact, is a misfortune to all 
of us. There is no doubt that enough people will feel 
disposed to help make the mission of Santa Barbara, a 
place of beauty, and a fitting shelter for its pious occu- 
pants. 



Telephone Company Official Passes 

Just in the prime of life, at the height of his executive 
activities. George F. McF'arland, chairman of the Execu- 
tive Sommittee of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, passed away Friday of last week, at St. Luke's 
Hospital, after an illness of only ten days. 

McF'arland was a shining example of the "self-made man" 
of which America is wont to boast. His telephone career 
began as a lineman in a small eastern town in 1880, and 
From then on he won successive promotions until he be- 
came vice-president of the Iowa Telephone Company. He 
came to San Francisco in 1913 to succeed Henry T. Scott 
as president of the Pacific Company, which position he 
held until last January, when he was made chairman of 
the Executive Committee. 

HC home was at Hillsborough, and he and his family 
were prominent in society affair- of that aristocratic com- 
munity. Beside- hi- widow. Mrs. Cornelia McF'arland. he 
leave- five daughters, Mr-. Harold Everett of Long Beach; 
Mrs. Elliott Bristow and Mrs. J. C. Draper of San Mateo; 
Misses losephine and Marcia McFarland and Hulbert Mc- 
Farland. 



California's Diamond Jubilee 

Participation by the United State- Army on a brilliant 

and extensive scale in California'- Diamond Jubilee eele- 



New Curwood Book 

Oliver Curwood has struck a new vein in his writing, in 
this latest novel of his. — "The Ancient Highway." for his 
-cene has swung from the Northwest of Alaska and the 
Three Rivers' Country to that most Eastern of Canadian 
province; — Quebec. This novel i\'<e~ not deal with history, 
it i- of today. It brings the beauty of the natural world 

home to its reader-, as Curwood'- 1 ks are wont to do. 

and this service, which causes men to look at the sky at 
times other than when an airplane i- writing a Ivertisements 
upon it. i- greater in this author's case than in a number ol 
esser literary lights, because he is successful not with a 
few, but with multitudes. 

»olitan Book Corporation, $2.<X) 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lulv 2?. 192 




>LD4SURE'SW4ND 



OBEY NO u/AND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moore- 




Columbia 

BLANCHE BATES came back 
"home" Monday evening, when she 
opened at the Columbia Theater in 
"Mrs. Partridge Presents—" which 
gives her an exceeding brilliant char- 
acter to portray. 

MY ! MY! I well remember her some 
years ago when she was playing at 
Elitch's Gardens in Denver! Those 
were the days when young girls made 
idols of their favorite actresses ! What 
a beautiful woman she was, and is 
today! It is a regular treat to have 
a glimpse at her once more. 

This is an ultra modern play, treat- 
ing of a woman, who, although the 
mother of a grown daughter and son, 
starts out on a career of her own. after 
finding matrimony a dismal failure. 
She tries to order her children's lives, 
with surprising results, and the mother 
finally realizes that each individual 
must work out their own salvation. 

There is a fine company supporting 
Miss Bates, including Charles Wal- 
dron. Edward Emery. Jr., Edmund 
George. William Worthington, Edwin 
H. Morse, Katherine Revner, Charlotte 
Irwin. Augusta Haviland. Muriel 
Kirkland. Suzanne Feday and others. 



Curran 

The popularity of the world-fami >us 
musical comedy, "No, No, Nanette." 
at the Curran continues at the high 
peak established since the opening per- 
formance. All box office records for 
this theater at the present scale of 
prices has been broken by this delight- 
ful play. 

Taylor Holmes and Nancy Wclford 
head the cast, but it is difficult to 
single out any one person upon whom 
to bestow especial prise, for from first 
to last, they are all good. It is an un- 
usually well-balanced performance. 

Only eight other cities in the United 
States have so far been able to enjoy 
this play, — San Francisco having a ten 
weeks start on New York City, as that 
metropolis will not have a glimpse of it 
until Labor Dav. 



By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 

opened in Andre Picard's comedy, 
"Kiki." 

.Miss Uric played the little chorus 
girl for two years on Broadway, and 
for still another year in the larger 
cities, and San Francisco now has the 
opportunitv of viewing her in this role 
of a Paris street gamin. 

Seen in support of the star are Fred- 
erick Vogeding and Josef Swickard, 
with Alice Buchanan ; Victor Rodman 
and Rodney Hildebrand also contribute 
largely to the success of the play. 



Capitol 

"Lightnin'," — the play which made 
Frank Bacon famous, opened to an en- 
thusiastic audience last Saturday eve- 
ning. The company is a splendid one. 
and of course, much interest centered 
around the appearance of Mrs. Bacon, 
as "Ma," the long suffering wife of 
"Lightnin'." the part which was writ- 
ten for her by Frank, and she acquitted 
herself in a most creditable manner. 

Thomas Jefferson is very good in- 
deed in the title role. Bessie Bacon 
puts lots of comedy in the part of the 
divorcee. The other roles were all ex- 
cellently portrayed, — those in the cast 
include Jack Marvin, Myles McCarthy, 
William Wagner, and many others. 



Wilkes 

Lenore Ulric made her first appear- 
ance here in ten years last Monday eve- 
ning at the Wilkes Theater, when she 



Loew's Warfield 

"Chickie" will be seen on the screen 
at last, beginning today at Loew's 
Warfield. This is a story of the girl 
of today — her desires, temptations, 
and triumphs. It is human, sincere, 
and a worthy drama for young and old 
to see. 

A sterling cast will enact this tre- 
mendous story. Dorothy Mackaill 
gives her finest performance as 
"Chickie." Then there's John Bowers, 
Hobart Bosworth, Gladys Brockvvell, 
Olive Tell. Myrtle Stedman, Paul 
Nicholson and man}- others. John 
Francis Dillon, who directed "Flaming 
Youth" also directed this picture. 

Fanchon and Marco will present an- 
other of their clever "Ideas" and 
George Lipschultz and his Music 
Masters will be heard in another of 
their pleasing entertainments. 



St. Francis Theater 

This theater, formerly known as the 
Strand, is in process of re-construction 
and re-decorating, and the manage- 
ment is looking forward to definitely 
announcing within a very short time, 
the opening of San Francisco's new 
downtown theater. 

Named for San Francisco, the man- 
agement promises to devote its pro- 
grams to the newest expression in pre- 
sentation and the screening of the 
finest motion pictures obtainable. The 
largest electric sign in San Francisco 
will be a feature of the exterior. 



Theater Arts 

The fifteenth monthly program of 
the Theater Ait- Club was given at 
the Players Guild Theater last week 
under the able direction of Talma- 
Zetta Wilbur. 

Four interesting plays were given,— 
George Middleton's "In Hi- I louse." 
"The Anonymous Letter." by Kenyon 
Nicholson; "The Valiant" by Hols- 
worthy Hall and Robert Middlemass, 
and "The Loving Cup," a comedy by 
Alice Brown. 

Some of Mrs. Wilbur's most tal- 
ented pupils were in the cast ami each 
play was given in a splendid manner. 



Alcazar 

This is the last week of the captivat- 
ing musical comedy, "Irene," which 
ha- proved such a popular attraction 
at the Alcazar. Many factors contrib- 
uted to the great success of this play, 
but none more than the very attractive 
California chorus, which were all care- 
fully -elected by Duffy, himself. 

Most of the principals were brought 
here from Xew York and are members 
of the original "Irene" Company, — 
Dale Winters having starred in the 
piece for two seasons. Duffy, who has 
-cored such a hit as Madame Lucy. 
also played the part in the East. Flo 
Irwin, Walter Regan, Gladys Nagle, 
Sidney Reynold-. Ilenry Coote and 
Dorothy La Mar all were in the origi- 
nal cast. Ralph Murphy. Grace 
Hayes, Walter White and llenrv Cau- 
bisens also add much to the perfec- 
tion of this comedy. 



lulv 25, 1925 



S \\ FRANCISO > NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NKXT WKEK 



AZTEC > 

Market nr. Eighth (. 

EGYPTIAN I 
Market at Jones 



Pictures 



ALEXANDRIA 1 Pictures 

tieary ami ISth J 


ALCAZAR 1 Henry Duffy Players, 
O'Farrell nr. Powell \ "Irene" 


CALIFORNIA 1 ,,,, ., „ 
»""- J "Marry Me" 

4lh ami Market ) 


CAMEO ( "The Man Who 
D30 Market St. J Played Square" 


CAPITOL t "Lightnin"' 
>Iarket and Ellis t 


CASINO 1 

Mason anil Ellis f Pictures 


CASTRO { 

42» Castro St. J Pictures 


COLISEUM | 

clement ami 9th ( Pictures 


COLUMBIA J "Mrs. Partridge 
Eddy anil .Mason \ Presents " 


CURRAN | 

Geary ..r. Mason J "No, No, Nanette" 


GOLDEN GATE ) 

„ „ . . ,„ . , Vaudeville 

G. G. Ave. ami Taylor 1 


GRANADA } Night Life in New 
I0«« Market St. j York 


HAIGHT ) 

H„i s ht at c„lc \ Pictures 


IMPERIAL \ „ w . |d Horse Mesa „ 

1(177 Market St. 1 


LOEWS WARFIELD 1 

B8S Market St. \ "Chickie" 


MAJESTIC | 

vi ission ih-i ween ( Pictures 

20th ami 21st > 



METROPOLITAN 
205s I nlon St. 



Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1820 I'illmorr 

NEW MISSION 
ItBSO Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM 1 
O'Farrell and Powell \ 


Vaudeville 


PANTAGES 1 
Mnrkff nt Maaon \ 


Vaudeville 


PORTOLA 1 

7711 Mnrk.-I \ 


Pictures 


PRESIDENT ) 
Market A McAllister \ 


"The Best People" 


ROYAL | 
IBM Polk St. \ 


Pictures 


SUTTER ) 
Suiter ami stelner \ 


Pictures 


UNION SQUARE ) 
<>*l-'arreH nr. l»o«ell \ 


Pictures 


WILKES } 
t.*'ur> ami Maaoa \ 


"Kiki." 
Lenore Ulrie 


WIGWAM 1 
Mission nml 234 t 


Pictures 



President 

Tomorrow marks the beginning of 

the seventh week of Avery Hopwood's 
masterpiece of fun, ''The Best Peo- 
ple," at Henry Duffy's President The- 
ater. The large audiences at this 
ever-growing-in-popularity theater at- 
test its universal appeal. 

It is a matter of much gratification 
to Duffy that this play has proven to 
be such a success, by reason of the 
fact that he was given the first produc- 
tion rights to the play on the Pacific 
Coast, and his presentation is the first 
West of Chicago. New York and Bos- 
ton were the only other cities to see 
it ahead of San Francisco, and Duffy 
has now staged it at his Metropolitan 
Theater in Seattle. 

Merriment predominates in this 
play. The chief comedy roles are in 
the capable hands of Marion Lord and 
Earl Lee, and the leading parts are 
splendidly portrayed by Norman 
Hackett, David Herblin and Eveta 
Nudsen. There is a strong and well- 
balanced supporting cast. 



Orpheum 

In keeping with the splendid bills 
which have been the rule this year at 
the < trpheum, the headline attraction 
is Annette Kellerman, famous wonder 
woman of the water, who is returning 
to vaudeville after a long absence. She 
has with her two clever comedians. 
Tom and Eddie Hayden and the De- 
lortes Trio in several dance specialties. 

Yvette Rugel, incomparable minia- 
ture prima donna i^ another bright star 
on the bill, appearing in "A Bit of 
( >ld New York." Margaret Severen. 
a noted exponent of the dance, offers 
a fantasy of color, -peed and daring. 
She i-, known as the P.enda mask 
dancer. Assisting her is Sidnej 
field, with his own particular 
of comedy. 

Jimmy Hussey, assisted by 
Mickey is remaining over for a second 
week in a brand new comedy ottering: 

Ward and Van have a tuneful comedy 

.ut entitled. "< iff Key." 



Land- 
brand 

Eddie 



Golden Gate 

Quite an aggregation of vaudeville 
favorites appear on the bill this week 

at the Golden (late. Heading the li^t 
i* Blossom Seeley, "the girl who glo- 
rifies syncopation" with an entirely 
new production. She will be assisted 
by Benny Fields and two peppy pian- 
ists. 

Crowding the headliner for first 
honors is Frank Fay, New York com- 
edian, who has a great comedy offer- 
in g : "It's All a Fake" is the name 
of a .Mie-act musical playlet presented 
by Marie Sabbott and her company in- 
cluding lack Thompson and the Brad- 
_ 



Definont 

CHICAGO 



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ALREAOY FAMOUS FOR 
ITS HOSPITABLE 
ATMOSPHERE • • • 

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SUMMER. RATES 
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G.E.Billingslei) 




Golfing 

on fairway? of vivid green, in 
refreshing mountain air; nine 
holes; Jim Smith, professional 
Come in ihf mountain resorl **i 
•II outdoor recreations) Write 
fur illustrated folder, rates and 
reservations, to Waller Roun- 
bct el. 




Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the Edge of the Berkeley Hllla 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



[ulv 2'?. 1925 





yQcery 




By Antoinette Arnold 



Smart Set Abroad 

SOCIETY folks of San Francisco, now sojourning in 
Europe, supply a list which reads like cullings from the 
Blue Book. 

Now-a-days it is no unusual a thing to greet groups of 
friends at smart events bidding them "Bon Voyage" as 
they sail for world tours or European trips, and then, with- 
in a few months, on meeting them again in Paris. London 
or in Rome, discover that practically the same group is 
assembled at a greeting party. 

The exodus abroad, this year, has been noticeably large 
among local society folks. Every one seems either to have 
just been abroad, or just going. Many go twice, three 
times, or more, and think nothing of it. 

Transportation facilities account for much of the rapid 
transit across the seas. Distances are easily bridged these 
days, and miles melt into insignificance when traveling 
is the urge. 

Perhaps one of the most feted of San Francisco girls is 
Miss Louise Boyd, daughter of the late John Boyd and 
Mrs. Boyd of this city, who was.presented at the Court of 
St. James. She has been passing the summer in London 
and has recently gone to Paris, where she is the center of 
admiration at brilliant affairs. 

A luncheon was given at the Hurlingham clubhouse, just 
before the second game of the poll' series, when Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Kenyon Joyce, military attache of the Ameri- 
can Embassy in London, was host to a group of Califor- 
nians. They included Miss Louise A. Boyd, Mr. and Mrs. 
Boylston Beal and Miss Bessy Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Hussey. 

Mrs. Newton Knox, of California, was the honor guesl 
at a luncheon given by Princess Asaka, sister of the Em- 
peror of Japan. The Garden Club at Chesterfield Gardens 
was the setting for the luncheon with sweet peas of red 
and white used in the decorative scheme. Princess Asaka 
has been staying with Mme. Okomota of the Japanese Em- 
bassy in London. At this luncheon Mrs. Knox wore a 
large picture hat of black satin with a white water-lily 
and organdie dress. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Baumgartner, Miss Elizabeth and 
Richard Baumgartner of San Francisco, were in Paris For 
the Grande Semaine. Mr. and Mrs. Lionel M. Alanson, of 
San Francisco, have returned to Paris after their sojourn 
in Versailles. 

Professor Ernest Babcock, of the University of Cali- 
fornia, and Airs. Babcock, who have been traveling in Eur- 
ope for the past six months, are en route home. 

Mrs. Daisy Hyde and Miss Hyde of Oakland, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. S. Mayer and Mr. Chester North of San Francisco 
are among those now touring Europe. Colonel I). A. 
Smith, of the California National Guard, arrived, recently 
at Havre on the French liner, De Grasse. 

Mrs. W. F. Welty, formerly Miss Eleanor Woods, daugh- 
ter of the late William Woods, and her voting daughter, 
have been spending some time in London. 
f ■-■■■■-■-■■----■ ■ ■■■--■■--,_, .. . ■ ■ , ,^.^>^^^„ 

COLONIAL HOTEL 

J 050 lluNh Street. Iletween Powell nnd Stockton. Sim FrnnclNC 

i Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



Miss Jane Vail, who has recently returned to California 
after a visit in Italy, is now visiting her sister, Mrs. Albert 
Van Court in Pasadena. Miss Vail was spending a few 
days in Santa Barbara at the home of Mrs. Norris Davis 
and her daughters, Miss Margery and Nancy Davis at the 
time of the earthquake. Miss Vail, who attended Sacred 
Heart Convent at Menlo Park, often visits at the home of 
Mrs. Ashton Potter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Sharp, of San Francisco, with Miss 
Adrienne Sharp, have been in New York after their six 
months' tour of Europe. Miss Sharp only remained in the 
eastern metropolis a short time, returning with her aunt, 
Mrs. Colgate Hoyt, of New York, to Europe. She expects 
to spend several months abroad. 

Mis. Henry Foster Dutton has returned to California 
after many months in New York and has joined her hus- 
band at the Webber Lake Country Club, where the Dut- 
tons will remain, visiting friends at Lake Tahoe. 
* * * 

Lake Tahoe Mecca For Society Folks 

Lake Tahoe, the great scenic resort of northern Cali- 
fornia, is even more popular with society folks, this year, 
than ever before. Hotel accomodations being admirable, 
and the gorgeous lake, itself, offering its unusual attrac- 
tions for pleasure seekers, there has been a general exodus 
among the smart set of San Francisco and the peninsula 
cities, for the lake. 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker and Mrs. Jennie Crocker 
Whitman left for Lake Tahoe last week, intending to 
spend some time there. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Mc- 
Near are spending these summer days at their lovely 
Tahoe residence. Mrs. George Newhall is at Lake Tahoe, 
and so are Mrs. Herald Rathbone and Mrs. Harry Scott. 

Mr. and Mrs. < ieorge Cameron have been the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Drum at the picturesque Drum resi- 
dence on the Lake. 

Festivities on Lake Tahoe this year assume all the 
fascinations of a Venetian water carnival. Every 
Saturday night the society folk enter into the gayeties 
of the boat parades with pennants and lanterns adorn- 
ing their boats and yachts. The spectacles are simply 
entrancing. 

Colorful det orations, including brilliantly lighted booths 
along the shoreline, and flying banners of every known 
pleasing combination add to the festive scenes. Strolling 
singers and dancers provide lavish entertainment in which 
the society folks participate adding their handsome cos- 
tumings to enhance the lovely picture of it all. 

Dancing, yachting, fishing, and all manner of favorite in- 
door and outdoor spurts, constitute some of the pleasures 
ol the Lake Tahoe visitors, as if the lake itself were not all- 
sufficient to satisfy the soul of one. 

But no one can visit Lake Tahoe for even a brief perio 1 
of time without feeling the elixir of life and the joy of liv- 
ing which accounts, in a measure, for the magnificence of the 
memorable sights which greet the visitor. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutler fljao Under Management CARL S, STANLEY 



July 25, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Out of Town 

Miss Alice Carr of Dallas, Texas, was the re- 
cent guest of Mrs. Phillip Foster Brown at the 
Marin Club. Miss Carr has been spending a 
few weeks at the Hotel Rafael with her mother 
Mrs. Wallace Carr and her brother, Wallace 
Carr, Jr. The Carrs formerly made their home 
in San Rafael. 

Mrs. Eyre Pinckard gave a luncheon at her 
san Rafael home a short time ago in compliment 
to a number of her friends including: Mesdames 
Marry Evans, Wakefield Baker, Philip Brown, 
William Hendrickson, Kenne'.h Mcintosh, Maur- 
icia Mintzer, Evan Evans, Horace Van Sick- 
len, Frederick Beaver, Jr., William Kent, Jr., 
James Moffi'.t, Miss Mauricia Mintzer. 

One of the most delightful events arranged 
for the visiting midshipmen was the barbecue 
given in Muir Woods under the auspices of the 
fleet committee. 

Another great outdoor event for the visitors 
was a swimming and supper party given at the 
Mount Diablo Country Club with Mrs. Ralph 
Phelps the hostess. 

* * * 

Claremont Country Club 

The tea dance at the Claremont Country Club on Mon- 
day for the junior officers was one of the most attractively 
arranged parties in a succession of navy affairs. Some of 
the San Francisco and east bay women who received at 
the tea were: Mesdames Irving Lundborg. Oliver Kehr- 
lein, George Baker, Joseph Carlson, B. C. Lyon, Edward 
de Laveaga, Edward Fennon, Monroe Greenwood. Frank 
Moller, Salem Pohlman, Harry Kluegel. John Knox, Fran- 
cis Connell, Harvey Lyon, Stanley Dollar, Harry East 
Miller, Vernon Hardy, Joseph Knowland, Bertram Railey, 
Werner Schuur. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emil J. Pollak and family of New York, 
who are summering at the Fairmont Hotel, celebrated the 
eighth birthday of their twin sons. Master Emil and Master 
Bergert Pollak, with a family dinner in the Venetian room. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Samson and Master Rudolph Sam- 
son, who reside at the Fairmont Hotel, have left for a two 
weeks* sojourn at Lake Tahoe. They are stopping at Ta- 

hoe Tavern. 

* * * 

Engagement Told at Tea 

Miss Gertrude Ward was hostess at a daintily appointed 
tea in the garden of Hotel St. Francis recently, at which 
the engagement of Miss Florence Brandt to Sir. Patrick 
Allen Devine was announced. 

Lovely baskets of flowers in the pastel shades adorned 
the tables and individual corsages were placed tor the fol- 
lowing guests: Mesdames Charles C. Glynn, J. J. Flynn, 
J, \. Rettew. Herman 11. Kohlmoos, I. 11. Devine. Charles 
W. Brandt, E, C. Counter, Herbert H. Bendheim. Mis^e- 
Alice Dreyer, Anne Radke, Alice Jorgenson, Anita Luns- 
inan. 

* * * 

Mrs. Washington Podge has left for her ranch at Prince- 
ton alter a feu days in San Francisco at the Fairmont 

Hotel. 




i < AjNTIOItlU ItV 
TSO SulliT Street 

San Francisco's Finest 

Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 

Rates: From J2.50 per day 



News Told at Tea 

The engagement of Miss Carol Cook, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. John T. Cook, and Mr. John J. Allen, 
Jr., prominent Oakland attorney and member of 
the Oakland Board of Education has been an 
nounced. The news was told at a formal tea given 
by the bride-elect and her mother to 140 guests. 

Miss Cook is a sister of Mrs. Ralph Lorimer 
of Piedmont and Mrs. C. E. Whitamore of Shan- 
hai, China. She is a graduate of Miss Merri- 
man's School and a former University of Cali- 
fornia student. She is a member of the Alpha 
( "micron Pi Sorority. 

Mr. Allen is the son of Judge and Mrs. J. ]. 
Allen of Oakland and is a prominent University 
of California graduate. 

* * * 

San Franciscans who are enjoying a change 
of scene at Feather River Inn included: Mr. and 
Mrs. Melville P. Meyer and Carter Meyer, Mr. 
Martin J. Weil and Miss Mary Weil, Mr. and 
Mrs. B. P. Oliver, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Barnes, 
Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Wills, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
F. Pfau. Mr. M. W. Pauson, Misses Frances 
and Ru'h Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Cochran. Mr. G. F. Sul- 
livan, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lippitt and family, Mr. and Mrs 
Zelfo Estcoort, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Hunter, Mr. E. A. Free- 
man, Mr. J. A. Marengo, Mr. S. O. Bowles, Mr. and Mis. 
Benjamin Boas and Mr. Roger Boas. 

* * * 
Recent Arrivals at Feather 
River Inn Are as Follows : 

July 16, Thursday 
Mrs. William Marshall, Asbury Park, N. Y. ; J. N. 
Stephan, Quincy, Calif. ; Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Pierce, Siiisun, 
Calif.; Mrs. W. C. Robbins and daughter. Suisun, Calif.; 
Sam Modi, wife and child. Los Angeles: Mrs. Irving Lund- 
borg and Miss Helene Lundborg, Oakland; C. H. Mayer 
and family. Reno. Nev. ; Mrs. Gene Byrnes. Carmel, and 
Mrs. Rose Braddo, San Francisco. 

July 17, Friday 

A. F. Hichbom and wife, Sacramento; Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam F.de. Jr.. Piedmont ; Dr. and Mrs. M. A. Preston, Berke- 
ley ; Gladys Jones and party, Berkeley; Mr. and Mrs. R. G. 
Clifford. Berkeley: Mrs. Karl Filers. New York City: Miss 
Filers. New York City; Jos. Harris, San Francisco; Dr. and 
Mrs. Leo L. Meininger, San Francisco; D. F. Watkins and 
wife. San Francisco; Sidney Lippitt, Jr., San Francisco. 

July 18, Saturday 
F. Clement Horst, San Francisco; II. Balkan (Dr. i. San 
Francisco; Mrs. M. ('. Rosewood, San Francisco: Miss Pearl 
Rosewood, San Francisco; Miss Lorraine Lee. San Fran- 
cisco; M. Brown and family. Los Angeles; Mrs. B. C. Mil- 
ler. Reno. Nev.; Mrs. J. Harwood Priddy, Reno. Nev.; Mon- 
tague 11. Priddy, Reno, New; Mrs. L. Cassel, Shanghai. 
China: Mrs. J. R. Ferguson, Sacramento; C. F. Bierbauer, 
Hercules. Calif.; S. H. Kershaw, Wilmington. Del.: Mrs. F. 
Nordlinger, Los Angeles; Mis> Aimee Nordlinger, Los An- 
geles; Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Patchen, Reno. Nev. 

July 19, Sunday 
J. V. Bondi, Sacramento: B. F. Hyde. Fairfield. Calif.; 
J. Mcintosh. Reno. Nev.; John J. Goldberg, wife and child, 
San Francisco: S. Hasket Derby and family, San Francisco. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, Cauforni \ 

On (he Coa»l Highway Half«i> Between San Franriteo and I M Angcln. 
An Inn «f Intwaal Excellence 

Wire or nritr for rtia-ianoiu eat your M«xf trip kmhV 



: 



AGUA 



CALIENTE SPRINGS--- Why? ] 

:r and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- I 
o-active. hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- j 



It's the water 

tions. Radio-active, hot sulphu 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN. Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 25, 1925 



^90^ 



•swws* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



•^9Se/S*» 



-fcjfc 



Jff 




B 



lY winning the Junior State Championship 
• at Del Monte. Norman Macbeth, Jr., the 14- 
year-old youngster of Norman Macbeth of Los 
Angeles, one of the finest exponents of the game 
of golf in the Southern part of the State, prove 1 
that the boy is destine:! to become as famous as 
his father. 

Macbeth and his son Norman, Jr.. won the 
Father and Son tournament, which preceded the Junior Cham- 
pionship, and won it by a margin of several strokes over Roger 
Lapham and his son. L. A. Lapham. I When the qualifying 
round was decided, the following day, young Leslie Hensley, 
who had turned in the best card in the Father and Son tourna- 
ment, of 79, won the medal round for the Junior State Cham- 
pionship with a card of 80. while Norman Macbeth fell short 
six of that mark. The opening round of match play, however, 
found Macbeth playing the best contested match of the dav, 
when he defeated James Rowntree, one of San Francisco's 
star youngsters. 

Leslie Hensley, in the meantime, had an easy time disposing 
of Edgar Lint'er. another city aspirant. The semi-finals again 
brought out some classy golf by these two Southern boys. Les- 
lie Hensley disposed of Elmer Duffus in quick order, while 
Norman Macbeth put out Justin Esberg, the Sacramento boy. 
On paper it looked like a cinch for Leslie Hensley, as he had 
sho': beautiful golf all through and his wins were rather one- 
sided, but what a surprise was on hand when from the moment 
that Norman Macbeth stepped on the tee it was evident that he 
was imbued with the same kind of spirit that had won for his 
father scores of important matches. 

The last time we had the pleasure of a Norman Sr., win was 
when he captured the Northern California Championship, which 
was played over the San Francisco Golf and Country Club's 
course three years ago, when he defea'.ed that sterling player, 
Vincent Whitney in the finals. Norman Jr.. was there to watch 
his daddy win. 

Vcung Macbeth started out as cool as a veteran, although 
he is but 14 years of age. They halved the first two holes, then 
Norman wen the third with a birdie three, took the fourth with 
a par four, and captured the sixth with another par. 

It was not until the eighth hole had been reached that young 
Hensley got a look-in when he got his par and w n the hole, 
the ninth being halved in fours, each making a birdie; the boys 
finished, Macbeth 38, Hensley 40, with Macbeth leading two up. 
The new Champion started right by winning the tenth, nether 
of the lads weakening, until the unlucky thirteenth, when 
Macbeth slipped and Hensley won the hole. With the breaks 
against him Hensley tried hard, but young Macbeth kept 
pegging along winning fourteenth with a par three and re- 
peated with another par four on the sixteenth and the match 
was over. 

Norman Macbeth, we send you our congratulations fi r a 
better pair of game sports never met in any golf finals than 
yourself and your worth_\- opponent, Leslie Hensley, Gcorl 
luck to you both. 



Club held a very suc- 
which was open to the 



Mrs. Chandler a Winner 

The Burlingame Golf and Country 
cessful Invi'aticnal Golf Tournament 

women members of the Northern California Golf Association! 
when fifty-one players from the various bay cities an 1 Pen- 
insula Clubs participate. 

Mrs. Max Rothchild, wife of the eminent physician, acted 
as hostess of the day in the absence of Mrs. William C. Van 



wh 



o was <iow 



n at her country 



Antwerp, Captain of the club 
home at Pebble Beach. 

Mrs. L. R. Chandler, of the ( )lympic club, was the winner 
of the handicap sweepstakes when she returned in a capital 
card of 94-14-80. 

Mrs. Harding Brann. another ( Hympian, shared the honors 
with Mrs. Theodore Rethers, Jr.. of the Presidio, for second 
position, each having a net card of 82. 

Mrs. J. Schwitzer, of the Lake Merced Golf Club, led in 
the B class, winning her first cup in tournament play with 
a card of 83. 

Mrs. Schwitzer is a very improved player who ought to 
make a good showing in any company. 

Mrs. Fred Grube and Mrs. J. G. Dunleavy, of the Cali- 
fornia Club tied for second honors in this class with cards 
of 84. 

Mrs. Milton Morrison, of Lake Merced, who is compari- 
tively a novice at the game, having only played for a little 
over six months, won her second trophy within a month by 
winning in the C Class, also turning in a net card of 83. 

Mrs. Morrison is bound to make good as a golfer as she 
loves the game and practices faithfully. 

Mrs. George Leib and Mrs. A. J. Lowrey, of the host club, 
won the second and third prize. This was the first time 
that either Mrs. Leib or Mrs. Lowrey had played in compe- 
tition but on their showing it is more than probable that they 
are destined to be listed in many a win column from now on. 
(Continued on Page 15) 





Their watchword is smiling courtesy. —This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

£ RATES— Ver 'Day, singlr, £uropean 'Plan 



Tht renter 
for Theatre) 
'Bankt, Shpp, 

Tleate -UTilr 
for 'Booklet 



120 rooms with running water 92.30 to 94.00 

220 rooms wiih bath ■ • • 5.30 to 5.00 
160 rooms with bath • ■ 6.00 to 8.00 

Double. J 4 00 up 

Alto a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites, tome in period furnishing! with grand piano, 
tire place and bath, 1 10 00 sip. 



LARGE AND WELL EOUIPPED SAMPt E ROOMS 

["%«\(CHO QOLF CLUB] 

L available to all guestssi 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 
fffattagn 



nh 



HOTEL 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles N „. 



My 25, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 
Gene Farmer, chairman ot the transpor- 
tation committee for the visiting Knights 
Templar, who will stop in San Francisco en 
route to the triennial conclave to be held 
in Seattle, Washington, July 27 to 31, is 
arranging sightseeing tours for the visitors 
during their sojourn in this city. 

Acording to announcements made by A. 
G. Curtis, chairman of the reception com- 
mittee, more than 10,000 Knights and their 
parties will visit San Francisco. Hugh Mc- 
Kevitt is chairman of the general committee and states 
that the down town business district of this city will be 
decorated in gay colors in honor of the visiting delegates. 

Industries Show 

A. A. Tremp, general manager of the fifth annual Cali- 
fornia Industries Exposition, which will be held from ( )c- 
tober 17 to November 1, announced recently that chambers 
of commerce throughout Northern California are urging 
their members to exhibit the manufacturing, producing and 
all other resources of the State at the forthcoming exposi- 
tion. 

Mr. Tremp expressed his belief that in view of the Dia- 
mond Jubilee celebration, the Exposition of California pro- 
ducts would draw even larger crowds than those of last 
year, which registered beyond the 340.000 mark. 
"* * * 

New Faculty for Music 

Domenico Brescia and George Stewart McManus have 
been appointed members of the faculty in the department 
of music at Mills College. Brescia will teach the advanced 
counterpoint and composition. Mrs. Council Keefer Car- 
ruth, a former pupil and a graduate of Mills College, will 
assist Brescia. 

Brescia, who has been a resident of San Francisco for 
many years, was bom in Pirano, Italy, lie received his 
musical education in his native citj and in the conserva- 
tories of Milano and Bologna. He is a member of the Royal 
Academy of Bologna and an honorary member of the Royal 
Academy of Firenze. He has written four operas— "Sal- 
inara," "Vesperi," "Jose," and "Asseneth" ; a symphonj in 
I) major, a "Rhapsodic Symphony," several cantata-, an 
exhaustive treatise on the fugue, and a large number ol 

compositions in chamber music forms. 

George McManUS will direct the college orchestra and 
otter course- in the history of music. 

McManus i- a Californian pianist, who ha- studied 
abroad ami ha- become widely known throughout the 
United Slate- as a concert arti-t ami a very callable ac- 
companist. He ha- toured with a number of noted musi- 
cian-, his latest association having been with lean Gerardy, 
the cellist. * * • 

\n enjoyable dance was given recently in the post ex- 
change at the Presidio for the boys of the Citizens Military 
Training Camp. The guests were boys of high school age 
from different part- of the State who are training in the 
military reservation for a month, and the girls of the i >rder 
of the Rainbow, who were asked to assist Miss Hyde, the 
post hostess. The guests enjoyed an informal -upper, and 
disbanded shortly before midnight. 

1 1'nntinued on Paso 16) 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

Mrs. A. W. Stokes, president of the San Francisco City 
and County Federation of Women's Clubs, which includes 
a membership enrolment of something beyond 14,000 affili- 
ated women, is taking hold of her new duties with typical 
foresight and executive skill. 

She has made a number of appointments, securing in her 
selection of executivess women well trained in their several 
duties. Mrs. D. E. F. Easton, the retiring president, whose 
popularity has been excelled by no other leader, will act in 
the capacity of Chairman of the Department of Utilities. 

Other appointments made by Mrs. Stokes include the 
following: Mrs. George F. Keil, corresponding secretary; 
Mrs. J. E. Batterfield, recording secretary; Miss Kathryn 
Croney, financial secretary ; Miss Edith Fleming, assistant 
secretary; Mrs. Annie L. Barry, parliamentarian; Mrs. Har- 
old Seager, membership chairman ; Miss Russella Ward, civ- 
ics chairman ; Miss Jennie Partridge, Women's Building- 
chairman ; Mrs. E. A. Bagot, extension; Mrs. William Mc- 
Kinley, co-operation with ex-service men ; Mrs. A. J. Cloud, 
education ; Mrs. A. W. Scott, revisions ; Mrs. Geoffrey Holt, 

press. 

* * * 

Ground has been broken for the erection of the new fire- 
proof building for the Sacramento ( )rphanage to replace the 
one that was torn down after being condemned by the city 
fire department. The ground-breaking ceremonies were in 
charge of Mrs. S. E. Pope of the board of directors of the or- 
phanage. 

* * * 
Matrimony and Business 

In a recent issue of the San Francisco Chronicle appeared 
an editorial regarding girl.-, matrimony and — business. The 
points made are SO well worth one'- meditation that we feel 
it a privilege to quote this significant editorial: 

1 'resident Chaplin of La Salle Extension University 
rises to remark that the vast majority of women in husi- 
ness work without ambition, and that their real "object" 
is the traditional one of "matrimony." 

lie state-, as tending to bear out his point, that only one 

business college student in twenty take- an administrative 
course which would qualify her for an executive position. 

If girls do not take executive course-, it is possibly be- 
cause the) feel their minds are for detailed work rather 
than executive work, also because there'.- -till a prejudice 
existing against employing women in executive capacity. 
Women's advance in industry i- not to be -ought along 
line- of superficial equality, hut on the truer lines of division 
of function. As to the domestic life, there have been good 
business men who were also good family men since time 
began; ami now we may be in for an era of good business 
women who are also good family women. 

Men try to rise in business, as often as not because by 
-o doing they will provide better homes for wives ami chil- 
dren. The -ort of personal ambition that want- to ex- 
cel merely for the sake of excelling i- almost certainly 
less plentiful than the ambition to have a good home and 
properly educate the children 

* * * 

The California Federation of Business and Professional 
Women- Club- announce- it-elf as absolutely against 
•die enactment of needles- law-, through the report of its 
(Continued on Page ln> 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Julv 25, 1925 



THE PROGRESS OF "PACIFIC SERVICE" 



Civil engineers must have, like statesmen, a prophetic vision, 
as well as a practical working knowledge of their particular 
art or Lraft. When the engineering department of the Pa- 
cific Gas & Electric Company chose the Pit River as the main- 
spring of its Northern California developments it showed a 
foresight that has proved prophetic of illimitable water power, 
for when the different power plants are finished, there will be 
no less than seven of these 'wonderful hydro-electric plants, 
all supplied by the same source, the Pit River, whose flow is 
practically the same, year in and year out, and for that reason 
is unique in itself, as a California stream. 

The river has its main source in several large underground 
springs amid the lava beds of northeastern California. It is 
distinct from other streams that take their course oceanward 
in that it rises east of the Cascade range, and it is due to the 
lava formation that its progress is unchecked. In itself, it is a 
stream of moderate flow capacity, but it gains in volume 
through the contributions of several important tributaries ; 
notably. Fall River, Hat Creek, Burney Creekand Montgomery 
Creek, so that it reaches a volume of some 2500 cubic feet per 
second at the point called Rig Bend, where the last of a chain 
of Pit River waterpower plants is marked for construction. 

This chain of power-plants aggregate an installed capacity 
of approximately 670,000 horse-power, taking advantage of 
the drop of 2100 feet from a point on Fall River near its 
junction with the Pit of the Big Bend, a sixty-mile stretch 
of river. 

It is with the Pit No. 3 Development that we have to do 
just now. for it is to this power house that the different de- 
partment officials of the Pacific Gas & Electric Company con- 
ducted its annual excursion, given in honor of the editors 
and publishers of California, from Friday evening, July 17th. 
until Monday morning, the 20th. 

At Sisson the guests were transferred from the Southern 
Pacific Railroad to the special train of the P. G. & E. which 
wound along the rails of the McCloud River railroad, in and 
out of ihe primeval forests and by rushing streams, with new 
scenes of snow-capped Mt. Shasta in view, for the first thirty- 
five miles, on to the power house at Pit Xo. 3. Here the 
machinery of this tremendous plant was set in motion by the 
turning of a switch, which Miss Bernice Downing manipulated, 
and after this ceremony was over, the guests were conducte 1 
to the modern camp, five miles up the Pit river, overlooking 
the new dam, where a delicious dinner was served. The 
assemblage was then invited to a moving picture entertain- 
ment, when detailed information and instruction were given 
by experts, regarding the various dams and power houses "ii 
the Pit river. 

The following speakers were included in this interesting 
program: Prof. C. L. Cory of the University of California, 
and Prof. Flarris J. Ryan of Stanford, who is considered 
the best authority in the world on power transmission. Able 
and enlightening speeches were also ma''e by General Manager 
Frank A. Leach. Jr.; P. M. Downing, vice-president in charge 
of electrical department; A. H. Markwart, vice-president in 
charge of engineering department: A. F. Hockenbeamer. vice- 
president and treasurer; and J. P. Jollyman. chief of the 
hydro-electric department. 

These speeches were made in a language which the lay- 
man could easily understand, regarding the construction aiid 
operation of these great plants, and something of the enor- 
mous energy that is caught and disseminated throughout vir- 
tually the Northern half of California, was realized by the 
interested audience. 



Sunday was the occasion of a very beautiful and impres- 
sive ceremony. — the dedication of the new lake formed by 
the dam at Pit No. 3, in an address made by Senator C. P. 
Cutten in memory of John A. Britton. Quantities of flowers 
were thrown into the waters of the lake from the top of the 
dam, and it was formally christened Lake Bri ton, after the 
late beloved president of the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 

The days spent in the camp at I'it No. 3. which is considered 
a model in itself, and whose situation, sanitation, operation 
and efficiency in general reminds one of an ideal army reserva- 
tion, were all too short, and the guests left with the impression 
that if it were possible for every large corporation to give 
such instructive and pleasurable trips to groups of the in- 
terested public, a more harmonious feeling would exist be- 
tween employer, employee and consumer. One particular 
thing that was very noticeable was the co-operative spirit that 
existed between the heads of the different departments, a 
spirit that has been instrumental in helping them to complete 
this enormous undertaking within the past two years. 

These excursions are an education in themselves along the 
lines of knowledge of hydro-electric power, its source and in- 
ception, and its operations, and benefit the hospitable hosts and 
the pleasurably and instructively entertained guests alike. 
They are given so that the general public may be inf urine 1 as 
to the magnitude and character of P. G. & E. operations and 
their obvious necessity, and are practically the only medium 
through which the laymen can be so informed. Newspaper 
men and women, teachers, ministers and business men. make 
up the fortunate guests on different occasions. If it were 
possible to invite every consumer of gas and electricity to in- 
spect these wonderful plants, it would be an event of great 
educational significance, but the list must be. (with the enor- 
mous expense entailed) a comparatively limited one. an 1 so 
far, these excursions have been found to be the best me hod 
through which to convey to the people in general, the great 
scope and nature of the work which the Pacific Gas & Elec- 
tric Company is carrying on. This organization is to be 
congratulated on its personnel throughout its various depart- 
ments. 



Small Boy — I want some medicine to reduce flesh. 
Shop Assistant — Anti-fat ? 
"No, uncle." — Tit-Bits 



Large numbers of Italian eggs are being imported into this 
country. We trust they are not the lays of Ancient Rome. — 
Humorist (London) 



"Where are you going, son?" 

"t.'iing to the circus, father." 

"Where did you get the money?" 

"Mother gave me a quarter for telling her that I saw you 
kissing the maid." 

"Here's half a dollar, son : go hack and tell her what a.i :,u- 
ful liar you are." — M. I. T. Voo Doo 



Billy — Are you going to the dance Friday night? 

Bet'y— I don't know. You see. I have only one dress which 
is fit to wear and mother says that I must wear that or noth- 
ing, and I positively refuse to wear it. 

"Will you go with me?" — Penn Punch Bowl 



My 25, 1925 



SAN FRANCISO I NEWS LETTER 



13 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club. 

ONE of 1 be most interesting of the 
touring districts of California is the 
region that lies about the base of Mt. 
Konoekti in Lake County. The moun- 
tain stands 4200 feet above sea level and 
one of the most remarkable panoramas 
to be encountered anywhere in California 
is visible from its summit. The Sierra 
Nevada lie to the east and with their 
snow-crowned peaks forming a back- 
ground to the colorful landscape of the 
great Valley of the Sacramento. To the 
west are the summits and canyons of the 
Coast Range extending to the shores of 
the Pacific while to the north and the 
east is Clear Lake, the largest holy of 
water within the borders of the state, 

Mt. St. Helena. Mt. Cobb, Mt. Diablo 
and Mt. Tamalpais be to the south. One 

id' the must glorious sights of 'he sum- 
mer season is tin- sunset seen From the 
summit of Mt. Konoekti. 

The Lake Count} region max be ap- 
proached from the south by wa\ of St. 
Helena, from the west b\ wa\ of Clovei 
dale or Hopland, from the nor b by wa> 
of Ckiah and to the east over the Ckiah 
to Tahoe highway, which runs through 
Bartlett Springs. Each of these routes 
possesses its own peculiar charm. 

Twelve miles to the northwest of Clear 
1 ake on the road to Ckiah is a chain of 
lakes above the sea. The I lop- 

land route is particularly attractm 



ing to the remarkable panorama visible 
I rum the summit of the ridge as the 
motorist descends into the Valley of 
Clear Lake itself. The western entrance 
also follows the shoulders of the moun- 
tain and descends to the shores of Clear 
Lake over a winding road upon every 
turn of which there is a picture to de- 
light the lover of Nature. 

Scores of resorts are to be found along 
the shores of Clear Lake, and in the 
canyons which form a network of beauty 
throughout the district. Clear Lake it- 
self lies 1500 feet above the sea level, 
it is thirty-five miles in length and from 
one to ten miles in width. The upper 
part of this Lake extends from Mt. Kon- 
oekti to the town of Copper Lake. At the 
foot of Konoekti the Lake is divided into 
two great arms by a narrow neck of 
land, the northern portion of which 
forms East Lake while the southern 
bounds in Lower Lake. The deepest por- 
tion of this body of water is directly op- 
posite Soda Ray. This little inlet was so 
called because a spring arises at this 
point. 

Lake County has a great background 
of Indian legend on account of its pe- 
culiar location and, as it was isolated for 
so long a time from the highways of 
civilization, the Indian population carried 
on their various occupations here un- 
molested up to a few years ago. Most of 
l he legends of the northern California 
Indian tribes are preserved in the rec- 
ords of the aboriginal inhabitants of 
Lake County. 

"In the beginning of things." says one 
of their legends, "there was nothing but 
a great tunle cruising about in the limit- 
less waters, but be dived down and 
brought up earth upon which he created 
the world. There was originally a sea 
all over the Sacramento Valley and an 
earthquake rent open the Golden Gate 
and drained it. The earthquake de- 
stroyed all men but one who mated with 
a crow and re-people I the w . rl.l. lie- 
lore anything was created the frog and 
the old ba Iger lived alone together. The 
badger wanted a drink and the frog 
gnawe 1 a tree; sucked out and swallowed 
ip and discharge 1 it in a hollow 
place, lie created other frogs t<i ;i~-m 
him and together they finally made Clear 
Lake. Then he created the little flat 
whitefish and it swam down Cache Creek 
and turned into a great salmon, pike. 
sturgeon and whatever other mighty fish 
there are in the waters." 

Lake County has a peculiar lure for 
.he vacation-seeker inasmuch as it "ffers 
perhaps a greater variety of attractions 
t Continued on Page 161 



(Qoch cor ojberofed^^ 

hi/ re/iah/e 

c/raufreurs 
w/to uiorou<fmu under- 
stand their Jbus/ness 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Plione Grnystone 270 

1020 Pine Street 

S:in Francisco 



Attention Club Members! 




Have 
You 
Sampled 
a 
Club 
Business 
Lunch 
at 
SINGLE- 
TON'S 
ALLEY 

CAT 

LUNCH 

INN? 



Delicious, Dainty and Decidedly Different. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON ' 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 
SAN Fl< VW ISC (I 



Look for the 
GREEN and 
WHITE 
i SIGN 



GENERAL 

GASOLINE & 
LUBRICANTS 



Meet Your 
General 
Dealer Today 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jul 



1925 



Finance 



EDWARD CHAMBERS, vice-president of the Atchison. 
Topeka and Santa Fe Railways in charge of traffic, after 
inspection, says: "The moving of fruit and vegetable crops in 
this state exceeds anything in transportation service m the 
world. . . . Business conditions are good and there will be a 
market for grapes and other fruits, and those demanding these 
food products will be able to purchase." 

* * * 

An investigation into inheritance taxes in this state, by 

Professor Rolland A. Vandergrift, director of research for the 
California Tax Improvement Association, shows that of the 
$54,865,040. received by the state from inheritance taxes, San 
Francisco and Los Angeles counties together paid 68 per cent 
of the total. The remainder came from the other counties. 

* * * 

F. S. Howard has been appointed assistant to the pas- 
senger traffic manager of the Southern Pacific at San Fran- 
cisco, having been transferred from the post of general pas- 
senger agent at El Paso. 

* * * 

—The Canning industry of this country employs more 
than 100,000 people, and $300,000,000 of American capital 
at this season of the year. Its products are sent to prac- 
tically one hundred countries. The product this year will 
be worth $450,000,000. Greater progress has been made in 
the art of preserving food products in this country than 

anywhere else. 

* * * 

— The offering by Kuhn. Loeb Company, of $40,000,000 
Central Pacific Railroad Company, thirty-five-year 5 per 
cent guaranteed gold bonds is the most important issue of 
the past month. It concerns distinctively California enter- 
prises, such as the Central Pacific Railway Company and 
the Southern Pacific Company, which guarantee the bonds. 

* * * 

— Dillon Reed and Company have brought out a second 
issue of the Great Consolidated Electric Power Company. Ltd. 
of Japan, the amount being. $13,500,000. The purpose of the 
issue is for adding to the generating and distributing plants 

of the company. 

* * * 

— Key Svstem Transit Company has applied to the Rail- 
road Commission for an investigation of the rates and service 
schedules of the company and the establishment of such urban, 
interurban. passenger and freight rates as will result in a fair 
return on the investment. The company sets out that it i- re- 
quired to make improvements aggregating more than seven mil- 
lions and a higher return is necessary. Present return is about 

3.3 per cent. 

* * * 

— Germany is making no sensational recovery. Reports show 
that the conditions are about parallel with those of other Euro- 
pean countries and that conditions in Germany are more pre- 
carious than elsewhere by reason of the state of the money and 

credit market. 

* * * 

— Fundamental conditions have improved in this country dur- 
ing the past month and the outlook is more encouraging than 
it was in the spring months. Pudding operations still continue 
throughout the country on a great scale and the fear that the 
limit has been reached is so far not justified. 

* * * 

— The notable feature in insurance this week is the tremen- 
dous increase in earthquake insurance. $20,000,000 worth was 
applied for in one day recently, in San Francisco offices, out 
of the $37,000,000 purchased by the Assoc : ated Oil Company. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fu id 479,081 .25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1CHT STREET BRANCH I latitat and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J/0 per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
■ 'aid I'p < 'initial s^ii. nun. ikiii s^ii.iiiiii.iinii Itmerve Inn, I 

AH Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLUSCTIONS effected promptly 
and at SEASONABLE KATES. OVER 6"0 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW FORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San FrnnelMco Ollleet 4.-,0 CALIFORNIA STREET 
mil t i; HEATHCOTE \\ . j. col I.TllAltll 

Manager A*„t. Manngrer 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco. Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Mannfaetnrpr. of 

RIVETED STEEI. PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS, FLUMES. 

PENSTOCKS. I. \siltil lll'.lts. SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 

San Francl'CO. Calif. _|„„ Allude.. Calif. 

r,7IT Snnta l> Avrnttr 



444 Market St. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building f Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearnv "91 



1925 



S \\ KKANCISCU NEWS LETTER 



GOLF 
(Continued from Page 10) 

Mrs. Brent Potter, of San Jose, was the medalist of the 
day, when she led Mrs. I.. I\. Chandler, the sweepstakes win- 
tier, by two strokes. 

There were a number of celebrities entered but their scores 
were nut in keeping with their usual game probably caused 
by the excessive heat wave that swept the course. 

Mrs. Louis Lengfeld, Captain of the Beresford club, should 
have finished close to the top, but got in trouble on the last 
hole. 

Mrs. Entil Sutro, who won the Lake Merced and Menlo 
Championship, quite recently, was forced to pick up early 
in the game. 

Mrs. J. H. McClelland, the Champion woman golfer of the 
Olympic club, and Mrs. Simon Erlanger, who drove up from 
Santa Cruz to play, just failed to get around the prize win- 
ners. 

Unfortunately Miss Geneve Fisher, of Lake Merced club, 
wdio has shown such great promise of becoming one of our 
real star players, suffered a slight accident at Del Monte, 
playing in the' Independance Day tournament which kept 
her from entering, hut she hopes to he back playing golf 
again in the course of a few days. 

Mrs. Max Rothchild hit on a happy thought when she 
announced at the luncheon, that followed the tournament, 
that the Burlingame Coif and Country Club would issue in- 
vitations to the women members of the Northern California 
Golf Association to play in the Invitational Tournament the 
second Tuesday in each month. 

This invitation was received with much enthusiasm by the 
women present and as soon as this good news gets spread 
around among the members of the various clubs, the Bur- 
lingame club can rely on a record attendance each month. 



MEN AND THEIR BIG EVENTS 
(Continued from Page 11, Col. 1) 

More than 100,000 radio dealers, manufacturers and fans 

Horn all parts of the Pacific Coast and the East will attend 

the second annual Pacific Radio Exposition in the Civic 
Auditorium August 22 to 28, according to Herbert E. Met- 
calf, president of the Pacific Radio Trade Association, spon- 
soring the evenl 

This radio show, according to h. J, Cram, in charge of 

Eastern manufactu'ers' exhibit-, at the exposition, used 1? 

per cent more exhibit space than tin' International Radio 

Exposition held in Grand Central Palace, New York City, 
last year. 

* * * 

WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

1 1 Continued From Page 11, Col. 2) 

president. Miss Zulu Clements She maintains that it is 

the modern tendency to spend much time trying to set 

aside the inviolate laws of Nature and to ,,nl\ succeed 

b\ such effort in sotting still m ire laws in motion — a pro- 
cedure which can on!) result in lawlessness. Miss Clem- 
ents holds that it is impossible to legislate industrial pros- 
perity or morality, that this can only be accomplished b\ 

ibservance of natural laws and that what is needed 

is less law and greater enforcement. 



Fine Fishing on the Klamath River 
Along Redwood Highway 
We are pleased to announce u'iicially at this time, that 
the Klamath River, owing to the fact that hydraulic mining 
ions on this and Trinity Risers have ceased for the 
Summc", lias cleared up. and the jolt) re swarm- 

ing he e in anticipation of salmon and steel head fishing 
Summer and Fall. Blue Creek is already the Mecca 
of the trout fishermen. The outlook is most propitious 
for followers , the g ntle art which Isaak Walton made 
us. 



On the Feather River 
Mr. ami Mrs. Fletcher Hamilton, Mr. Heath Hamilton, 
Mr. Alexander Hamilton, Miss Edna Hamilton, Miss Beth 
Sherwood and Miss Kathleen Pringle are at Feather River 
Inn for a fortnight, 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Covington Pringle have gone up to Feather 
River Inn for a 10 day vacation. 

* * * 

Mr. E. Clement Horst and Dr. II. Barkan are guests a' 
the Inn for a fortnight. 

* * # 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Danforth Boardman and Miss Kate S. 
Boardman are on Feather River for a vacation outing. 

He — Shall we exchange this dance. 

She — What could we get for it ? — Dartmouth Jack O'Lautern 

* * * 

Cop — Here, how did you fall in that gutter? 
Souse — I shaw two lamp-posts, osshifer, an' I guess I leaned 
on the wrong one. — Hamilton Royal Gaboon 

* * * 

Theda — Jack's a leading man in the movies now. 

Bara — Yes ? 

Stillbara — Yeh — an usher — Penn State Froth 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the «* 

VALLFYo/f/ieMOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms." 

Clean Room*, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Visit Sonoma County'* Famous Re*nrl» and Mineral (Warm vV,,,rTi Swimming 

Tank* From The. Hotel. 

Rate* i ■■■ ■pi i. mi. ill'. Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 



i 



KK\NK SANDBL1N 
Free Auto Lin- Meet* All Train* 



PALACE HOTEL 



F. W. SANDEL1N 

ileam Heal Throughout 

Telephone in Room) 



LK1AH. CALIFORNIA 

On thr RfiiunnH Highway 

80 Room* 25 Willi Balh, ft With Shower Bath 

SANDELUN A 9ANDEUII Ameriran and European Plan 



FETTERS' HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Mas- 
seur in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming 
pool. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Rates. $18 up. 
Write George Fetters. Mgr.. or Peck-Judah. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 



k JhosEKent$ 



Shirts 

Pajamas 

Night Robes 



'1 

ThbsIJ&ni 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. | 
San Francisco Phone Market 64 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Fuly 



1925 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
ley Sisters ; Fern Redmond and H. 
Wells will provoke laughs with their 
skit, "The Gyp"; Margaret and Mor- 
rell, novelty entertainers, have a new 
offering ; Chong and Rosey Moey, well- 
known Chinese entertainers, offer their 
version of American songs and dances. 

The screen feature is the second of 
Hal Reach's comedy melodramas, 
starring Glenn Tryon and Blanche 
Mehaffey called "The Battling Ori- 
ole" and' the plot deals with the great 
American game, baseball. 

Claude Sweeten and his orchestra, 
and Grace Rollins Hunt at the organ, 
complete the bill. 
Imperial 

Zane Grey's famous best seller, 
"Wild Horse Mesa," opened at the Im- 
perial yesterday. It is a thrilling story 
of the rugged West, staged against 
nature's wilderness, and is filled with 
thrilling episodes of wild horse hunt- 
ing, capturing horse thieves, perilous 
trails. Indians, romance and adven- 
turous drama. The climax of the plot 
is the terrific stampede of 5000 fear 
crazed horses — one of the most awe-in- 
spiring and spectacular scenes ever on 
the screen. Jack Holt, Noah Beery, 
Billie Dove and Douglas Fairbanks, 
Jr., provide the human interest. 



"Narcissa" at Wilkes 

Nine performances of Mary- Carr 
Moore's opera "Narcissa" are to be 
given at the Wilkes Theater as a fea- 
ture of Diamond Jubilee Week, Sep- 
tember 6 to 13th. Dealing with Amer- 
ican history in what truly may be 
called American music in the English 
language, it will be sung by Americans, 
who have learned their art in this 
country and most of them are residents 
of San Francisco. They are expected 
to demonstrate not only the adequacv 
of American themes and the artistic 
efficiency of American composers, but 
as well, that such a production may be 
given to the satisfaction of music lovers 
without the importation of foreign 
artists. 

Alice Gentle is to appear as "Nar- 
cissa." with Stella Raymond-Yought as 
alternate, and Florence McEachran 
and Constance Reese in subsequent 
performances. Anna Ruzena Sprotte 
of Los Angeles, who created the part 
of the Indian prophetess is to repeat 
her performance with Flora Howell 
Bruner. Margaret Jarman Cheesman 
and Ruth Scott Laidlaw are to alter- 
nate as Siskadee, an Indian girl. 

Many other singers have minor 
parts, with a chorus of seventv which 
Mrs. Moore will conduct with a large 
orchestra. 

If you want good, clean, wdiolesome 
fun, "go straight" to Pantages, where 
you can find it for the small sum of 15c. 




bads. 

SantaFc 



round trip 

Atlanta, Ga $109.35 

Boston, Mass 153.50 

Buffalo, N. Y.... 120.62 
Chicago, 111 86.00 



Cincinnati, O. . . . 
Dallas, Texas . . . 
Denver, Colo. . . . 
Des Moines, la.. 
Detroit, Mich.. . . 
Houston, Texas. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Memphis, Tenn. . 
Minneapolis, Minn, 
Montreal, Que. . . 
New Orleans, La. 



106.30 
72.00 
64.00 
77.65 

105.62 
72.00 
99.24 

120.43 
72.00 
85.15 
87.50 

144.42 
85.15 



New York, N. Y. 147.40 

Omaha, Neb 72.00 

Philadelphia, Pa. 144.92 

Quebec, P. Q.... 155.72 

St. Louis, Mo... 81.50 

Toronto, Ont 121.42 

Washington, D.C. 141.56 
and others 



B B 



Start Any Day — Return Limit Oct. 31st 

BRIDGING the distance across America the Santa 
Fe offers a wide choice of service and accomodations. Din- 
ing cars exclusively or meals at Fred Harvey station restaurants 
and lunch rooms. Drawing-room Compartment and Section Pull- 
mans on all trains. Tourist cars Eastbound daily effecting a saving 
of approximately one-half in sleeping car fares. 

See GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK en route. 

[A postcard will bring our illustrated folders and detailed information] 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices and Travel Bureaux 

601 Market Street and Market Street Ferry Depot, Tel. Sutter 7600 
SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND SANTA ROSA 

434— 13th Street S16 Fourth Street 

SAN JOSE 
15 Euet Santo Clara Street 



S\CRAMENTO BERKELEY 

[006 K Street 2131 Univenity Ave. 

STOCKTON 
221 Fiftl National Bank Bldg. 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued on Page 13) 

than any oilier section of the state to- 
gether with an equable climate tlia' at- 
tracts thousands of tourists every year. 
Boating, fishing, swimming, hunting an I 
hiking are year-round pleasures of the 
inhabitants of Lake County and these a - 
tractions, together with the scenic pan- 
oramas to be enjoyed from scores of 
vantage points in the hills that border on 
Ihe Lake, make it one of the mos ! pleas- 
ant of all the vacation haunts of the state. 



Distinct Signals 
A cause of irritation, confusion and 
frequent mishap is the failure i n the 
] art of driver^ of moor vehicles to make 
their signals for turning and stopping 
pronounced and distinct. If every driv- 
er had served an enlistment in the Army 
he would realize the force of this sratc- 



ment. Due to the fact that in the noise 
and confusion incident to active com- 
bat, verbal commands and even bugle 
calls cannot be heard, most of the lead- 
ing of troops is done by hand and arm 
signal. Because human lives are de- 
pendent in this case upon the ready 
comprehension of signals, all leaders 
are taught to make these signals in a 
very decided manner. So in traffic 
where lives may be dependent on the 
signals given by motorists these sig- 
nals should be clean-cut and positive. 
If you mean to stop, do not hang your 
arm languidly over the edge of the' car. 
If you mean to turn left, do not project 
■ lie linger a few inches beyon 1 the door, 
or if turning to the right, do not -tick 
a hand out at random ami expect those 
in the rear to be mind readers. Your 
signal may prevent serious accident. Sig- 
nal and signal correctly. 



fuly 25, 192S 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Mr. Blabbitt on Fiction 



FICTION is supposed to be anything that isn't so, gotten 
up for the purpose of amusing others and, incidentally, 
to make money. Fiction, then, might be termed "a polite 
lie — or a series of them, in connected or disconnected form." 
This definition is not according to Webster or his more 
or less worthy successors, since the column is — today only 
— on fiction. The dictionary deals with fact, so this might 
be called an abridged fictionary. 

Although fiction is commonly associated with adven- 
ture, love and attendant amusements of non-existent crea- 
tures it, in reality, has its greatest realm outside the field 
of books and magazines. Bottles, jars and cartons, con- 
taining everything from synthetic Scotch to headache 
powders and wrinkle creams, bear labels on which are 
printed or engraved — according to the price — some of the 
most brilliant fiction ever devised by dwellers in the land 
of Penpush. No single statement on these bits of paper 
are true, except the price named, but they create delusions 
and allusions, which are the pillows for weary minds tired 
of unducoed fact. If they please for an instant or create 
hopeful expectations, they accomplish more than some best 
or worst sellers, made up of anywhere from two hundred 
to six hundred sheets of perfectly good paper. Their 
only disadvantage is that they ultimately harm the paving 
of the best way to man's heart — his stomach — or the best 
road to a woman's vanity — her complexion and her silken 
locks. 

The charm of fiction lies in allurement. The virtue of 
fiction rests in its ability to star erstwhile sluggish minds 
to a semblance of action. Fiction, unlike its authors and 
readers, never dies and always comes to damnably happy 
endings. Certain "arty" writers often try to deviate from 
this rule, but their works are read only by arty persons — 
which are, thank everyone, in the minority. 

Movie directors succeed in making their puppets change 
printed words to more or less entertaining shadows and 
blurs. Movie publicity men are able to make a screen 
version of "Little Women" seem like a lurid romance of 
p-o Vrn vin'age. These worthy mortals overlook one bet. 
They should, by rights, advertise the same picture in the 
lobby for the benefit of spectators leaving the theater, fol- 
lowing out the old formula of "Before and After Taking." 

Modern advertising has, in reputable publications, 

ten away from fiction. People pay to be amused and not 
to In- stung. Xew Jersey has recognized this truth in stamp- 
ing out its fabled mosquitoes, and advertisers now know 
that fact is. if not stranger, at least move enduring than 
fiction. The same advertisers also know that any bald 
statement must be tempered with a little bunk and sachet 
to draw dimes ami dollars from dark corners of pockets 
and purses. 

Fiction comes in several odors and strengths — essence. 
perfume, toilet water an 1 vege ale. Some are pleasing 
and others stilling. Some are airy and tloat away on the 

:s and others stick until the mental fabric is dry 

cleaned and tidied up. 

What sort of individuals write fiction, in its various 
forms? From pictures in "Vanity Fair," "The American 
Mercury" and other publications catering to a clientele 
requiring predigested thought, we are led to believe that 
they invariably smoke pipes or cigarettes (as the occa- 
sion demands i. sport white flannel trousers, wear their 
shirts open at the neck and amuse themselves by graphi- 
cally delineating their family troubles and divorces in short 



articles, featured by certain of the greatest magazines in 
the world. This description does not apply to authoresses, 
unless the shoe fits. If it does, then this, at least, is not 
fiction. 



The Arts and Crafts League 

This evening, at Sequoia Hall, 1725 Washington Street Mme. 
Pietro Carolina will give the second musical dansant under 
the auspices of the Arts and Crafts League, of which she 
is the creator. 

The last dance was a Spanish-American affair, but to- 
night it will be an "All-American" dance, where Colonial 
dames and beaux, Indians, naval and army men and their 
wives and sweethearts will all commingle together. 



Teacher — Concrete is that which can be seen, abstract is 
that which cannot be seen. Now give me an example of con- 
crete. 

"My knickers!" 

"Good. Now give me an example of the abstract." 

"Yours." — Colgate Banter 



Only Expert Help in Our Sunshine Plant 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 



'Phone Market 916 



filf Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities In engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 



462 Hryant St., San Francisco 



122 Center St., Los Angeles 




i no OB viiv ST 




ii:i.. PItANKI.IM MM 

Mctnl W ., k \|i|i.r- 

i n t tt l n u fi> latntne- 

hilen — l>\ J - ice ITlrne 
Weill Ins — Bl«ek- 
tiiilthlnc. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. .1. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HA VIC Hllll r\!ts « AMIKn IID BRBAHRII 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

■ ■■fe>. :!.-.<• per dmj: *T..V1 per nionlh 

PHONE DOUGLAS :<3 

Sl» r*lonr* for Service and Slornee of %nlomnhlle» 



18 




N. W. CORNER 



FRANKLIN 2960 POLK AND POST STS. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



1 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES i 
San FmnclHco — Burllnerame 

We«t, 703 478 



Phone SurrBH 3278 

Win. Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San FrancUco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

At the Bib and Tucker 

This luncheon place has instigated 
a new dish, — a vegetable plate which 
is changed daily. It is a pleasant sur- 
prise to find home-cooked vegetables 
in a restaurant, for as a rule, meat and 
merely potatoes form the main feature. 
These vegetables are fresh from the 
garden, and not canned, as one gen- 
erally has to put up with at the ordi- 
nary cafe. Physicians tell us that as 
we grow older we should cut out meat 
to a certain extent. Those who find it 
necessary to do so, should try this par- 
ticular dish at the Bib and Tucker, at 
334 Sutter Street. 



One swallow may not make a .sum- 
mer, but a pair of baby-blue eyes can 
cause a fall. — Wesleyan Wasp. 

No. 1-16,330 

SUMMONS 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint 
filed in the office of the County Clerk of said 
City and County. 

Frederick Marriott, Plaintiff, vs. N. F. Wil- 
son. Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to: N. F. Wilson, Defendant. 

You are hereby directed to appear and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 
above, brought against you in the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, within 
ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and County; 
or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any monev 
or damages demanded in the complaint as 
arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for any other relief demanded In the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the Su- 
perior Court at the City and County of San 
Francisco. State of California. 

Dated April 30, 1924. 

(Seal] H. I. MOLCREVT. Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAGNETTO,, 

. „ Deputy Clerk. 

AUSTIN LEWIS. Attorney for Plaintiff. 473 
Mills Building, San Francisco. California. 



XOTICE TO CREDITORS 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. No. 41,989. 
Dept. No. 9. 

Notice Is hereby given by the undersigned. 
W. J. Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
John Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and tor the City and 
County of San Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within four (4) 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice to the said administrator, at his office. 
858 Phelan Building. San Francisco. Cali- 
ornia, which said last-named office the under- 
signed selects as his place of business In all 
matters connected with said estate of John 
Oliver, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Francisco, California, July 7, 



Dated. 
1925. 



San 



July 25. 1925 

"You know Archie? He beats his 
wife up every morning." 

"You don't say !" 

"Yes. He gets up at eight, and she 
gets up at nine." — Columbia Jester. 




Thelaqgerjvi 



©well' 

Off. 



HATiONAl CREST 



-the better it get? > 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cup* vrere nerved at the Pan- 
ama Poclflo International Exposition 



op**** 




PIONEER 



The 

Name 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete sat 1 sf ac- 
tion. There Is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 



m fUJVUVHJ ailBf yo u n s e a r mP ?eB h0 



pies 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
«1 First Street, San Francisco 




II V l'ABI\ STEAMERS I'ROII 
NEW YORK 

Direct Sailings via Panama Canal 

THE 110YAI. MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

570 Market St.. San Franriico 



CULLINAN & HICKEY. 
Attorneys for Administrator. 




WHERE TO DINE 




ICE CREA&, 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



Graystone 
3100 3101 311)2 



breakfast 
luncheon 

dinner; ^ 




tXeanon 



445 Powell St.. 

San Francisco 



Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 71 18 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, D'nner. 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50— Also a la Carte 
Merchant's lunch 11 a. m. to 8 p, ra. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing: i ns for banquets run! parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vl(rorouM )>nisliin>; once or twice a tiny Ih 
Inking very good care of them. Brushing: In only n pnrt of lite 
nroceSM. Many things can happen to your teeth which only n 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not he oh sound as you Imagine. A toothache meniiH 
trouhle; do not waft for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles tb*>+ will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth store? Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. »Iy nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off nil nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfleld 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extrncllona; Crowns; Self Cleaning IlridecH; 

Porcelain Work and Itoofleets Pinteti 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters o; St. Dominic 



u 



A WARNING! 

Eye strain, headache. diaaineBs, nausea, nervousness, cat- 
aract, double vision. Boating spots, poot memory, astig- 
matism, cross eyes, styes, discharging or water] eyes, 
iwoolen or crusty eyelids, itchy or inflamed eye*, farsight 
and nearsightedness, »r if one eye is weaker than ihe other 
— ihese symptoms -hould receive immediate care and atten- 
tion. We advise thai you consult 

George Mayerle, Optometrist 

Exclusive Optica] Practice "60 Market Street. San Francisco 




Make yourself at home 



»4 

| *j3L"A"Nc"oT r s" 

{ OtFnrrell and Lnrkln streets Plione Franklin D \ I 

INo visitor Should leave the oily without dining 
In the Qnesl cs.fi In A mei lea 

] l.iitM'heon (11)30 tu 2 p. m.) - ', 

J Mlmter, Week Days --.____ *i 
I Dinner, HnnilnyM and llnllilnT* - $1.7.' { 

i j 

-] i 



GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Fin-chased 

Phone Kearny 5S16 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AXD PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



L 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

It* Third \triim-. S\N MATKO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

i p. m. 

1 p. Til 

Sundays and Hoi 
I 30 i" 8:30 p hi onlj 
CI.OSKI) i.\ BR) hum) 11 
Half itim-k friim Htehwaj 




| II. Mm 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPI N V. H. TO 11:00 P. M. 

I \-l RPASSI D il ISINI 
<\RL Leonhaidi 

/orm. 

I.ol.lrn l..,lr I'.i.k I Lin* 



CLIFF-HOUSE 

Plate Lunch - - - 6 
Plate Dinner - 60c to 85c 
Sunday Dinner - - $1 .00 



A la Carte at popular prices 



DR 


B 


W. HAINES 


| Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell 




DENTIST 

Hours 9 t>. 4 1 


San Francisco 




Telephone Douglas 2949 J 
--■ ^ 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

9«ib Prr.«r<l B T Hand Onlv--»n.|. Cafl«d For and DaUTCTtd 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



Vn.'iMan t>\ftnt nn<l ' 



"■■il Pour SlBUl 

In \ iri.imi Horn 



U,l l*co 
Ph»m FtUNKLM 2S10 



Banquet Rooms an.i Card Rooms i 



j Phone Pacific 12] Run vrd P. Rort.rts. Proprietor , 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes. Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 



ISO Russ St. 



Phone Hemlock 170 



San Francisco 



r 



Travel/ 



Sail around the world — cruise ro tropical islands 
— visit the romantic pons of the Old World and 
the scenic wonders of the New — all at the ex- 
pense of The Chronicle. 

Winners of the magnificent travel tours to be 
awarded in The Chronicle Essay Contest may in- 
vite their own traveling companions. The expenses 
of both will be paid. Even spending money will 
be provided. It's easy to win one of these trips. 
Write to the World Tour Editor of The Chronicle 
to send you full particulars. 



s|j Forty Free Trips 

\ I '•) from The 
BfA fJ Chronicle 



•,Me 






n ? 



rus 









Wf/ft ' 



i.^ 



SAVE MONEY! 

Motorists Should Travel Via 

Golden Gate Ferry 

Between 

Sausalito and San Francisco 



Summer Schedule Now Effective 



FOUR FAST BOATS 



| Golden Gate Ferry Company 



A. O. Stewart 
President 



Harry E. Sheas 
f'ice-Pres. and Gen'l. Mgr. 



t ...... . .—..——.■.-----. ...... 


] 


^253.2 






V^Si 


T* ^ * -- 1 


10m /~* •"■ 


1 ime \li* W^tf' v^aru 

THE DEPENDABLE AUTOMOnil.E EEllltY 11,, ill,- niters 


motorists tin- shortest :tll,I llinsl ll 


reet nieanN of trnnsportu- ( 


tlon from Oakland, San Francisco 


, and all polatM Mouth, tn 


Vnllejo, Sacramento. Sonomn, Nap 


a anil Lake Counties and * 


nil points north. 




Automobile Fare. 55c; \,lui 


s. Kli-: children, .1c. 1 


'I'lie laivi-Nl ferry rales on San Francisco liny. 


Leave Oakland 


111 


Leave Vallejo 


Side at 


O 


side at 1 


"SHOUT-WAY" 




11 (III HOW COVE 


A.M. P.M. 


IT 


A.M. P.M. 


t«:(l(» 2:40 


111 


tr.:4.-> 2:20 


ll::tO 3:00 


U) 


0:15 2:40 


7:00 3:20 




11:45 3:00 


7:30 3:40 


111 


7:15 3:20 


8:00 4:01) 


r- 


7:45 3 : 1(1 ! 


S:2(l 4:20 


D 


8:20 4:00 ( 


8:40 4:40 


Z 


8:40 4:20 1 


»:00 5:00 




0:00 4:40 1 


9:20 5:20 


s 


0:20 5:00 1 


(1:40 5:40 




0:40 5:20 1 


10:00 11:1111 


X 


■ 0:00 5:40 1 


10:20 (1:20 




10:20 11:00 I 


10:40 6:40 


I 


10:40 11:20 1 


11:00 7:00 


>- 


11:00 11:40 1 


11:20 7:20 


11:20 7:00 1 


11:40 7:40 


< 


11:41) 7:20 1 


NOON 8:00 


5 


NOON 7:45 t 


12:00 8:30 




12:00 8:15 1 


P.M. 0:0(1 


r- 


P.M. 8:45 • 


12:20 0:30 


K 


12:2(1 0:15 > 


12:40 10:110 


O 


12:40 0:45 


1:(>0 10:3(1 


I 


1:00 10:15 I 


1:20 11:0(1 


(0 


1:20 10:45 


1:40 •11:910 




1:111 Mills ' 


2:00 '12:110 


UJ 


2:011 •11:4.-, 


2 :20 '12 :30 


I 


•12:15 1 


•1:00 1 H 


•12:45 


•Sattirdays. Sundays. Holidays — 


-'.\lra Trips DurlnK Heavy 


Traffic. TSundnys anil Holidays on 


v. 


A YEN .1. II INFOl 


1). Prcs. and f.en. MKr. 









[ <gff|S> 1 



TOPS 

SEAT C< »VERS 

ENCLOSURES 

UPHOLSTERING 

BODY BUILDING 

REPAIRING 



-ev*. 



-Jfr 



American Auto Painting Co. 

Incorporated 

Van Ness Avenue at Eddy Street 

Wm. B. Gibson, Mgr. Prospei i -L >ci " 



*&- 



-°&* 







J 



6W> 



ESTABLISHED /ULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 

SAN FRANCISCO SATURDAY, AUGUST 1st, 1925 



$5.00 PER YEAR 




Scene in 

Bidwell Park. 

Chico, on the 

Pacific 

Highway. 



PHiHO B\ \\HO\\L \i rOMOBILI Ctll SH's BUREAU 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Enclosed $ for which please send to my ! 

address copies of DIAMOND JUBILEE J 

EDITION OF SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. j 

Name 

Address 

Also mail copies direct to the following : 

Name } 

Address 



ii 

Name.. 



50 CENTS PER COPY 
Postage, U. S., 10 Cents. Canada and Foreign, 20 Cents 



Address.. 



Name 

Address 



Name 

Address 



Name 

Address . 



Name 

Address 



Name 
Address 



Name 

Address 



Name 

Address 



Name.. 



Address. 



The 



Diamond Jubilee 

Edition 

of the 

San Francisco 
News Letter 

will be published 

September 5, 1925 

112 PAGES 

Will Be Devoted to an Historical Review of 
the Story of California. It Will Be Illustrated 
by the Finest Collection of Old Photographs 
in Existence. Depicting Dramatic Incidents 
During the Pony Express and Vigilantes Days, 
Including- a Period From 1837 to 1 ( J25. 



Ord 



er copies now: 



50c per copy 

Postage, U. S.. 10c 
Postage. Foreign, 20c 



1 0«r 60//j Anniversary ]\ umber. Published in 1916. which con- 
tained n number of engravings that will be re-published in the 
Diamond Juliilce Edition, has had a ready sale at M0. 00 per copy 
during the last jour years. ) 




Established July SO. 1656 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

Tfc . a „„ EVoni-iscn News Letter and California Advertiser was founded .Inly 20. 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. 
I frnm Alt i, 19'i Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St.. San Francisco. California. Telephone 
Statt«>r 8536 i Entered 'at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. London, 
auiier oo England Subscription Rates (including postage), one yen r. SS.OO. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 1, 1Q25 



No. 5 



COURAGE AND CASTANETS 

By E. Farrand Ross 

scenerv of his native land, as does the 



We have been told that morals are a matter of geography, 
just as certain climates compel us to dress or undress ac- 
cording to the temperature. However true this may be, 
is not for the modest writer to say. but we will herewith 
state that we find in our daily peregrinations in and around 
the highways and by-ways of our beloved city, among all 
sorts and classes o'f people, native and otherwise, that 
climate, with its accompanying environment and scenery, 
has a deuce of a lot to do with the character of a popula- 
tion, and what, we ask you. are morals but character.' 



We have been thrown in with the suave and courteous 
and more or less lazy southerner, witli his inclination to 
lie and dream in the sun, and who resembles that nigger 
who, when asked if he didn't want to make a quarter, an- 
swered : "What fob? I already has a quarter." 



We have touched shoulders with the penurious middle 

westerner who. struggling lot generations with peculiari- 
ties and contrariness 1 of soil and weather, has had so much 
digging lo do in his farmer life, that he hates to dig down 
into his jeans for the necessary mazuma; 

We have talked with the breezy Texan, and listened to 

his drawl, and admired the lengthiness and strengthiness o) 
his muscles, and the bronze of his determined countenance, 
and fell the atmosphere of the clean-cut mountain ranges 
and the sunburnt plains of his 



native state, in hi-- presence; 



We have admired the big. fresh-col., red. swagger Chi- 
cagoan, who typifies only .1 certain portion of thai West 

that is East to us; . 

We have listened to the worldly, travel-wise Xew Yorker. 
who still is provincial m his idea that there is no place the 
equal in any way, to Xew York, and who is the embodi- 
ment, as a rule, of all that is modish in speech, manner. 

dress; who is so metropolitan and yet so cosmopolitan; 



ticular climate and 

real Californian ! 

And just now, witli the sound of castanets in the air; with 
the green and yellow and red of the colors loved by our 
Spanish ancestry flaming from the masculine straw hat, the 
feminine limbs, from shop front and hotel lobby, the fore- 
runners of the wonderful Jubilee Celebration to come, we 
believe it is a propitious time to analyze these character- 
istics that go to make up the complicated California nature. 

For we have been imbued with the smiling sunshine of 
our peaceful valleys; we have in reserve the strength and 
endurance of our mighty hills; the restless sea surging at 
our doors has given of its mystery and adventure to our 
spirits, and the gray fog soothes our souls with its freshness 
and vigor. We are of an intricate and complex nature, 
for our environment is intricate and complex ; and our aloof- 
ness from the rest of the world, here on the edge of the 
continent, has caused an aloofness and self-sufficiency of 
spirit that seems lo irk the stranger within our gates, unless 
he possesses the broader vision. 



We have been irritated and yet interested in the Bos- 

tonese, who firmly believes that "Culture" can only be 

found ill hi- home town, and that anything labeled with 

this word m any other section .if the globe, is only an in- 
fringement "tt hi- patent ; 

We have met others from different parts of New Eng- 
land; taking themselves and life in general very seriously; 
trying to legislate goodness into the complexity of human 
nature with' the reformers' urge that is a left-over from the 
davs of the Salem witchi 



Hut we never expect to meet anyone, from any part of 
the world, who embodies all the best qualities of the par- 



W'c remember meeting a woman from the East just be- 
fore the great lire, and what she said then, of Californians. 
in particular. San Franciscans. "Why." she exclaimed. "All 
mil Californians do i~ laugh! You take life as if it was a 
joke! That's all right for youth, but even people of mature 
years here, frivol too much. Are you always like that?" 

And then came the great cataclysm, and among the ref- 
ugees, I met her again. She had witnessed bravery and self- 
sacrifice in distress that was in some instances, agony; she 
had seen the majority of the population keeping their heads, 
organizing relief committees, standing in the bread line, and 
joking about their losses, their own appearance, and the af- 
fair in general; and it had seeped into her rock-ribbed Xew 
England conscience that people who laugh are not always 
thoughtless; that jokes are often just the froth on waves of 
storm-stirred depths. 

"When do you think of us now?" I asked her, and she 
answered, earnestly: "My dear. I think you are the most 
wonderful people f have ever met!" 

now Californians. let us live up to this reputation of 
wonderful people!" Let's make this Diamond Jubi- 
lee the greatest celebration that San Francisco i the city of 
celebrations) has ever experienced: let's show the world 
that \o U could put the Mardi Gras of Rome or Xew < irleans, 
the Rose Carnival of Portland, the old-time Fiesta of Los 
Vngeles, and all the other festivals of this globe into the 
middle of our jubilee and never notice them, beside the color 
an.l clamour and gayety and noise and enticement of our 
own. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTKR 



August 1, 1925 




gress. We are glad to let Australia have the money. But 
the effect upon the relations with the mother-land cannot 
be negligent. If Australia turns to us for loans for develop- 
ment, the same process will be apparent as has been noted 
in Canada, and United States finance will attain ever greater 
influence in the antipodean commonwealth. 



We always take an interest in the re- 
Probation Reports ports filed by the probation officer, 
for the work, when successful, shows 
so much of a social gain that it is impossible to ignore it. 
It is a .iew experiment and each step has to be watched with 
care, so that it may not deteriorate into a maudlin sort of 
sentimentality, on the one hand, or be hindered and crip- 
pled by an over hardness, on the other hand. 

The adult probation department of this city is in very 
competent hands. We are lucky to have so well trained and 
so wholesome a man in control as William II. Nicholl. 
His record is exceptionally fine and the results of his work 
are always so well and so conscientiously set forth. 

He reports that the total number out on probation at the 
end of June was 1402. These probationers earned $102,156 
in wages, during the month. There was collected from them 
$9958.83 for the support of their families. There was also 
collected from them to reimburse merchants who have sufr 
fered from their depredations, the sum of $4749.21. All 
of this money would have been wasted had it not been for 
the probation system. Not only that; but the community 
would have had' to furnish money for the support of these 
convicted criminals who would have had to remain in jail. 
quite unprofitably to the community and worse than un- 
profitably to themselves. 

The courts appear to be exercising a very wise discretion 
as to the numbers of those admitted to probation. Thus, 
in the month of June there were 14 admitted and 17 denied. 
a proportion which speaks loudly on behalf of the judges^ 
who must have exercised much thought and care over the selec- 
tion. 

After probation, the care of Mr. Nicholl is assiduous. 
Thus we find that the homes of 223 probationers were vis- 
ited in the course of the month. The matter is well man- 
aged in San Francisco. 



There is power in wealth, all 
Our Coming Hegemony power in wealth, as far as inter- 
national politics are concerned. 
We are the wealthiest nation in the world today and the 
natural result of that position will be the acquiring of power, 
whether we want it or not. We are obliged to become the 
chief power because our wealth will make us that, even 
without our own consent. 

The fact is, that today we are, quite without any action 
on our own part, but merely by virtue of that wealth fast 
becoming the dominant force among the English-speaking 
peoples. Since the war. we have rushed almost to tin- 
front and nowhere have our movements to eminence been 
more marked than in the relation which we are coming to 
take to the rest of the English-speaking world. England 
herself, by a strange trick of fortune, has now become out 
debtor to an extent which is embarrassing to that old 
established imperial concern. 

Canada, our good neighbor, which has maintained its 
political relations with Britain, comes more and more eco- 
nomically under the control of this country, as the invest- 
ments of the American group pile up, and the returns of 
those investments find their way here. When Canada 
needs money she turns increasingly to the community. 

Australia has just made a borrowing of $100,000,000 in 
this country as means of industrial and governmental pro- 



There never was a more 
Modern Productive Power complete example of the 

power of modern industry to 
produce wealth than has been shown in the restoration of 
the land of France at the close of about six years of effort. 
Prior to this the rebuilding of San Francisco was perhaps 
the most dramatic instance of this ability to produce wealth, 
for of course buildings and agricultural land are wealth, 
in the most accurate terms of the definition. 

The war had rendered 7,250.000 acres of land unsuit- 
able for agricultural purposes By the first of January 
of this year, 95 per cent of this had been restored to its 
utility ; the barbed wire, which had made at least three hun- 
dred miles of entanglements, had been gathered up and 
got out of the way; 97 per cent of the earth which had 
been thrown up to make trenches had been replaced and 
levelled down, and out of 5,000,000 acres of agricultural 
value, 4,525,000 acres were back again under seed. 

But the restoration of buildings is more striking still 
and more closely approximates to our own problem after 
the fire. The number of buildings destroyed was 893,792 
and, by the first of this year, 508,319 had been rebuilt. 
The number of factories destroyed was 22,900 of which 
more than 21,000 were rebuilt and at work on the first of 
January. Of the schools destroyed, which numbered 51 161, 
and the churches, which aggregated 3311, about half had 
been restored. 

This is an enormous record and has imposed a great 
burden, as the amount actually laid out to date is 74.206,- 
000,000 francs. It will take about another 18 billions of 
francs to complete the reconstruction. 

The effect of the wa r destruction has evidently been 
greatly overestimated, when it can be so readily replaced. 



We have repeated over and 
Inheritance Tax Reform over again till it is almost tire- 
some that there must be some 
measure of relief from the inheritance tax in this state, 
if we are to maintain ourselves in competition with states, 
like Florida, where there is no inheritance tax at all. 

We take it that the commercial and financial, as well as 
the industrial interests of the state are interested in the 
settling of the state by people of means, with plenty of re- 
sources, who can help to furnish the requisite capital for 
development and at the same time make their homes and 
take an active interest in the welfare and society of the 
state. 

Such people are, necessarily for the most part middle 
aged. In this country, one has not achieved independence 
and wealth much before that time of life. They are, there- 
lore, very likely to look ahead and to observe what, under 
the laws of the state in which they intend to settle, becomes 
of their money, which they have so painfully accumulated. 
One cannot blame them for that; it is natural enough. 

If they find that a large portion of this wealth, that they 
have obtained by dint of hard work and self-sacrifice Is to 
be taken away by a heavy inheritance tax, they are loath 
to settle in the state. They much prefer a state where such 
levies are not made and they will put up with some loss 
of climatic or other advantage, rather than allow their 
heirs to be shorn of a portion of the money accumulated 
for them. 



August 1, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



This fact is beginning to be recognized and it is with 
pleasure that we note that Professor Rollan A. Vandergift 
is in Sacramento overhauling the records of the State In- 
heritance Tax Department for the purpose of getting modi- 
fications of the existing law. 



If one were to suggest that much of 
Beans and Battle the future of the Orient rested upon 
the growth of a bean, it might create 
some incredulous amusement among the uninitiated. But 
so it is. The cultivation and disposal of the soya bean is 
the cause of the bitter struggle between the Russian and 
the Japanese for the control of Manchuria. The strife 
which marked the preliminary stages of the struggle lead- 
ing to the last Japanese-Russian conflict is again evident. 
The struggle is between two railroad systems for the 
control of the freight traffic, mostly soya beans. The 
Southern Manchuria Company is a Japanese project, in 
which the Japanese have sunk about half a billion yen. The 
Chinese Eastern Railroad is now in the hands of the Soviet 
government. Transportation is cheaper than anywhere 
else, as both the railroads run down hill to the sea. The 
soya bean, which disclosed many virtues during the World 
War as substitute for many mineral and vegetable oils then 
impossible to secure, is the main freight commodity. 

The Japanese have set up experimental farms and chemi- 
cal laboratories for the purpose of advancing the growth of 
the soya bean and better extracting the juices from it. The 
bean is grown by Chinese farmers who number the bulk 
of the population, estimated at about 11,000,000. The Rus- 
sians are about 200,000, and the Japanese about 150,000. 
Hence the crops are produced by Chinese, mostly under 
scientific instructions by Japanese experts. 

There has risen therefore, a railway-feight war which 
has reached a point where neither of the companies makes 
much money. There have been conferences which have 
not settled anything and the friction is quite marked. 



Compared with the number of tax 
Tax Exempt Bonds exempt securities in tin- bands of 
the public in 1912, those now held 
are three to one. The amount of such securities outstand- 
ing on July 1st of this year is over fourteen billion- of 
dollars. The growth has been extraordinarily rapid and 
even since 1923 has been conspicuous. 

Such securities in 1912 were a little over four billion dol- 
lars, and in 1923 ran over twelve billions. 

These figures are according to the report of the Nati 
Industrial Conference Committee. Of course there will 
be much dispute about them. The politician-, on the one 
hand, do not like to have such amounts of money exempt 

from the power of the state to levy taxation; on the other 
hand, the industrialists consider that such a state of things 
is very healthy and aids industry. Thus the Industrial 
Conference Committee says that it is of enormous benefit 
to the industrial life of the community; "when it is recog- 
in.nl that an industrial or railroad bond, even under the 
reductions of 1<L'4 would carry an 8.33 per cent couim.ii 
rate as against 4'.. per cent state or municipal bond, in 
the case of a prospective investor with a net income ex- 
ceeding $500,000." 

In order to place railroad and industrial bonds on an 
even footing with tax exempt securities, tax rates would 
haw to be reduced from 7.1 per cent in case of #10.000 to 
$14,000 net income up to 40 per cent in case of incomes of 
$500,000 or more. 

This is all very interesting and shows the complications 
which confront all statesmen engaged in the manipulation 
of the finances ,,f a country. Capital i- a very fluid thing. 
It is impossible to legislate it into solidity, which is ver\ 
fortunate for all of us. 



The Coming Celebration 

The story of California's Diamond Jubilee, which is to be 
held in San Francisco, September 5 to 12, has been put into 
movies to be carried all over the world. 

One of the leading motion picture news weeklies, the 
Fox, sent a cameraman over the city to photograph evi- 
dences of preparations for the big celebration, which will 
observe California's seventy-five years of statehood. 

A bevy of Henry Duffy's beautiful girls from the Alcazar 
Theatre were utilized to impart the human interest touch 
to the films. 

Motion pictures were taken of employes of large business 
institutions, such as the oil companies, who have donned 
the habiliments of the Spanish days of the state. 

Among the girls who took part in the film, which will 
be released for distribution within a few weeks, were Alice 
Bartlett, Sydney Reynolds, Alice Lucas and Donaldine Lucas. 



Death of William J. Bryan 

The death of William J. Bryan, suddenly, at Dayton, Ten 
nessee, on Sunday last, came as a shock to the whole coun- 
try. It was the termination of a career, to which the recent 
trial at Dayton of the high school teacher, Scopes, for \ io- 
lation of the state statute prohibiting the teaching of evolu- 
tion, had called the attention of the world. 

William Jennings Bryan was three times Democratic can- 
didate for the Presidency, and for some time held the posi- 
tion of Secretary of State in the Wilson administration. He 
was a political figure of the first rank and was rated among 
the best of modern orators. During his later years he had 
been Conspicuous for bis advocacy of an extremely literal 
evangelical Christianity. It was in pursuance of his relig- 
ious convictions that the trial at Dayton enlisted his en- 
thusiasms. 

There is no doubt of the peculiarly strong position which 
Mr. Bryan occupied in the affection of a very large follow- 
ing, especially in the rural communities. He was a man 
of the greatest personal integrity and simple honesty of 
life, a politician, whose up-bringing and mental make-up en- 
abled him to understand, almost instinctively, the desires 
and hopes of a \ erj large body of people in this country. His 
extraordinarily eloquent speech swayed vast numbers in 
conventions and public gatherings. His aspirations and 
intentions, though not always wise, were indisputably fine. 

Tin- decease of an honest public man is always deplorable. 
The country, therefore, rightly mourns the passing of one 
who in his generation contended for its welfare, as he saw it. 



Greater Movie Season 

The week of August S will usher in Greater Movie Season 
for San Francisco. A parade on Saturday, the opening day. 
with a dozen or more prominent screen luminaries partici- 
pating, will he one of the most elaborate events of its kind 
ever Staged in this city. Floats built for the parade a week 
earlier in Los Angeles, motion picture capital of the world, 
will be brought to San Francisco with the stars for the big 
-treet spectacle here and in < )akland. 

Before his departure to Washington. Mayor James Rolph. 
Jr. in a proclamation, which was issued by his office this 
week, said in part : 

"It is desired that the people of San Francisco co-operate 
in this movement, which has the support of many civic, mi- 
! and social service organizations. Because of ths 
prominent part motion pictures play in our present-day life, 
their qualities of entertainment and their educational in- 
fluence. I respectfully urge our citizens to participate ac- 
tivelv in Greater Movie Season, that the art of the screen 
may continue to advance to even higher levels." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1925 




>LEtfSURE$W4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore- 




Alcazar 

"Merton of the Movies" character- 
ized as a gorgeous burlesque of the 
films, merrier, brighter, shrewder than 
any stage offering in several seasons, 
opens at this popular theater tomor- 
row evening. It will give Henry 
Duffy, who will assume the title role, 
another stellar opportunity for his 
comedy talents and his many admirers 
will delight in his characterization of 
the smah town boy bitten with the 
movie bug. 

The original story by Harry Leon 
Wilson, was a masterpiece of satire 
and Messrs. George S. Kaufman and 
Marc Connelly have made out of it a 
delightful comedy which created gales 
of laughter wherever it has been pro- 
duced. 

Plaving opposite to Duffy will be 
Dale 'Winter, as the movie queen,— 
an appealing role, and one that should 
fit this charming actress to a nicety. 
There are more than a score of speak- 
ing characters and an elaborate pro- 
duction, which Duffy promises will 
suit the taste of his large following. 



President 

Marion Lord and Norman Hackett. 
who were brought here from Xew \ ork 
by Henry Duffy to open his new Presi- 
dent Theater on McAllister Street, have 
proved exceedingly popular with San 
Francisco amusement lovers, and their 
work in the current attraction, "The 
Best People," has earned them gen- 
erous praise. 

Starting tomorrow, will be the eighth 
week of this jolly play. Marion Lord 
i~ a gold-digging chorus lady in this 
production and extracts much fun from 
the role. Hackett is seen in the role 
of the aristocratic father of two rebel- 
lious children, both anxious to throw 
off the shackles of society. lie is a 
splendid actor and has earned new lau- 
rels for himself, here. 

Avery Hopwood is responsible for 
the creation of the many ludicrous sit- 
uations in the play, collaborating with 
David Gray, whose masterful hand is 
seen throughout the play. There is a 
fine supporting cast. 



By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 

Warfield, is full of life and jazz, mov- 
ing quickly from a novel masquerade 
party to a (lame at the Sixty Club, and 
from there to the all-night restaurants 
of Paris. It was adapted from the play 
of |. Hartley Manners. "The National 
Anthem," and portray> to what extent 
this generation has come under the in- 
fluence of jazz. 

Supporting Miss Griffith are Harri- 
son Ford and Kenneth Harlan, Xita 
Xaldi. Charles Lane. E. J. Ratcliffe 
and Edgar Norton, 

One of the best bookings made by 
Fanchon and Marco since their asso- 
ciation with this theater is opening 
also, — Frank Farnum and the Stuart 
Sisters. This happy trio were one of 
the feature attractions of Ziegfeld's 
Follies, Farnum being the originator 
of that weird dance craze. "The Char- 
leston." and the Stuart Sisters are 
beautiful girls with a world of talent. 
George Lipschultz and his Music 
Masters will entertain with several 
verv beautiful musical numbers. 



Loew's Warfield 

Corinne Griffith's new First National 
Picture, which opens today at the 



Gclden Gate 

A strong bill opens today at the Gol- 
den (iate. headed by Harry Carroll's 
big new revue, "Everything Will Be 
All Right." and played in conjunction 
with the first screening here of Rich- 
ard Barthelmess' new picture "New 
Toys," which i- "our Dick's" fust com- 
edy role, and in which he is supported 
by "Mrs. Dick." known professionally 
as Mary Hay. 

Carroll's latest offering has a large 
supporting company, and there are 
nine scenes in which singers, dancers 
and comedians vie for honors. Carroll 
composed the music and Ballard Mc- 
Donald the dialogue and lyrics. 

William Gaxton, the well-known 
-tar of the legitimate stage, is also 
a great attraction on the bill this week. 
Me will be seen in a playlet called 
"Kisses," written especially for him 
by S. Jay Kaufman. Five pretty girls 
make up the supporting cast. Bert 
and Betty Wheeler will be seen in a 
comedy offering, "Bits of Everything"; 
Sidney Landfield, monologist, known 
as "The Good Litle Bad Boy" and 1 ter- 
bert and P.olt Trio. "Slow Motion 
Athlete-" round out the bill. 

There will lie the usual short films 
and Claude Sweeten and his orchestra 



with Grace Rollins Hunt at the organ, 
will furnish the musical entertainment. 



Orpheum 

Opening tomorrow at the Orpheum 

is i me of the most talked of women in 
America. — Justine Johnstone, styled 
by the foremost artists and photog- 
raphers as "the world's most beautiful 
woman." She will appear in a playlet 
written for her by Edwin Burke called 
"Judy ( >'Grady." and this engagement 
marks the first appearance either in 
America or England of Miss Johnstone 
in vaudeville. 

Annette Kellerman. who was such 
a decided hit last week, remains over 
for a second big week; Yvette Rugel, 
the international prima donna who was 
also a great hit, will also be seen for 
the second week. Jimmy Savo. as- 
sisted by Jaon Franza, appears in a 
riot of laughter which he calls "Slow 
Motion": Lew Brice, brother of the 
famous Fannie, adds to the fun with 
his "Stick to Your Dancing"; Jess 
Libonati, xylophonist, Bert Ford and 
Pauline Price in "Dancing on a Silver 
Thread." complete the bill. 



Curran 

"No, Xo. Nanette," the sparkling 
musical comedy now starting on its 
fifth week at the Curran. is still pack- 
ing 'em in, and this is not to be won- 
dered at for Taylor Holmes with his 
inimitable comedy, ably assisted by 
Willard Mall, keep the audiences in 
uales of laughter. 

Dainty, petite little Nancy Welford, 
has sung and danced her way right 
into the hearts of San Francis's amuse- 
ment loving public, and all the other 
members of the large cast have splen- 
did opportunities. There is a chorus 
o| lovely i;irl- and boys who contribute 
much to the success of the piece. 



Capitol 

" Lightnin'" is proving as big a draw- 
ing card as ever at the Capitol. 
Thomas Jefferson, who enacts the lead- 
ing role, is compelled to respond 
nightly with a speech after the court- 
room scene. Bessie Bacon is splendid 
in the role of the vaudeville actress 
who goes to Reno to get a divorce. 



August 1, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

XRXT WKBK 



AZTEC \ 
Market »r. Eigrhlh f Pictures 
EGYPTIAN i Pictures 
Market at Jones 


ALEXANDRIA \ pMures 
Geary and 18th J 


ALCAZAR } Henry Duffy Players, 
O'Farrell nr. powell f "Merton of the Movies" 


CALIFORNIA } Adolph Menjou 
4th and Market \ "Lost — a Wife'' 


CAMEO 1 Tom Mix 

nan Market St. ( "The Rainbow Trail" 


CAPITOL ) „. :„ h ,„:„, .. 
Market and Ellis ( Lightnin 


CASINO | 

Mason and Ellis \ Pictures 


CASTRO 1 

42» Castro St. f Pictures 


COLISEUM | 

Clement and oth J Pictures 


COLUMBIA | "Mrs. Partridge 
Eddy and Mason [ Presents " 


CURRAN J 

Geary nr. Mason r "No, No, Nanette" 


GOLDEN GATE } Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor f Pictures 


GRANADA } Richard Dix 
10(16 Market St. J "The Lucky Devil" 


HAIGHT I 

HaiKhtatCole ( Pictures 


IMPERIAL 1 ...... , u 

, "Wild Horse Mesa 

1077 Market St. ( 


LOEWS WARFPELD 1 

08S Market St. 1 " The Marriage Whirl" 


MAJESTIC J 

11 Is.sion between t Pictures 

20th and 21st 1 


METROPOLITAN 

MBS Union St. Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1320 Fillmore 

NEW MISSION 
2550 Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM ( 

OV.mll and Powell | Vaudeville 


POMPE " [ "Charley's Aunt" 

Next door to llrunmlin 


PANTAGES | 

Market at Mason | Vaudeville 


PORTOLA 1 

770 Market ( Pictures 


PRESIDENT I 

.. . . ■ u .,,,.,... i "The Best People" 

Market *V Me \lllster \ 


ROYAL I 

IBM Polk St. Pictures 


SUTTER ) 
SntterandStelne, | Pictures 


UNION SQUARE } Pictures and 
ti'i'arreil nr. Po«eil \ Fritz Fields Revue 


WILKES | •Kiki." 

(ieary and Mason \ LenOreUlric 


WIGWAM } 

mi.»i»i, sn.i IM ( Pictures 



Mrs. Bacon's appearance in the cast 
as "Ma" Jones, lends added interest, 
and her performance is fine; all the 
other members of the cast perform 
well, and the large houses which are 
a nightly occurrence, attest the fact 
that San Francisco likes this produc- 
tion. 



Wilkes 

Lenore Ulric in "Kiki" at the 
Wilkes, is making a great impression 
with her characterization of the little 
Parisian chorus girl who, when she 
finds herself about to be expelled from 
the company, interests the manager in 
her. This is the roll in which Miss 
Ulric won undying fame in New 
York, where she enacted the role for 
over two years. 

Frederick Vogoding and Jose f 
Swickard are seen in the star's sup- 
port, as also are Alice Buchanan, Rod- 
ney Hildebrand, Victor Rodman, Fan- 
nie S. Burgett, Stanley Smith and 
others. 



Pantages 

"Brides of the Desert." an unusual 
presentation with elaborate scenic ef- 
fects, is the songologue surprise on the 
Pantages bill next week. J. J. Clux- 
ton is staging the number which guar- 
antees its entertainment value. 

Roy Rogers and Company bring a 
novelty comedj with music and six 
lovely girls in "Twenty Minutes in a 
Parisian Cafe": "Hello. Fred," serve- 
Smith and Holden as a vehicle for their 
I 'articular brand of humor: < ieorge and 
Lily Garden need no introduction to 
San Franciscans. These artists of the 
xylophone play classical as well as pop- 
ular numbers; the lireat Junestros 
troupe do Stunts on stilts that are 
amazing; the Dancing Dorans have a 
unique turn; Pal o'Mine is the screen 
feature, with Irene Rich playing the 
lead. 

rol Weston has an interesting con- 
i erl of popular music. 



Pompeii 

Another new theater opens it- doors 
to the public today — the Pompeii, 
which is located next door to the 
Granada. The first ottering will be 
Syd Chaplin in "Charley's Aunt." 

The Pompeii is owned by M. L. and 
D S. Markowitz, making the third 
which will be operated by these men. 
They have aC > recently acquired the 
Egyptian and Aztec from the Grafs 
who will center all their efforts on film 
production. 

The Egyptian will be closed, but the 
Markowitz brothers will continue to 
operate the Rivoli, \ztee and the new 
Pompeii. 

(Continued on Pase 16 1 



<nk 



8 



*£> 



Belmont 

CHICAGO 



ADVANTAGES 

OVERLOOKING BELMONT 
YACHT HARBOR AND 
LINCOLN PARK GOLF 
COURSES • • • 
ANEW HOTEL-700 ROOMS 
OPENED EARLY IN 1924 
ALREADY FAMOUS FOR 
ITS HOSPITABLE 
ATMOSPHERE • • • 
•:- •!■ •;. 

SUMMER RATES 
WRITE FOR BOOKLET 

G.E.Billinqslei} 




Horse back riding 

Gallop across the open coun- 
try, or canter along mountain 
- — lint- mounts are avail- 
able at Feather River Inn. the 
mountain resort of all out- 
door sports. 

Swimming, fishing, tennis, 
golfing OS a wonderful green. 
Dancing every night. Write 
for folder and rates to Walter 
RonnseveL 




Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the r:,l It of the Berkeley Mill. 

BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
D a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hoteL 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1. 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



DO SOCIETY girls spend their time in behalf of others? 
Do they? Well, have you heard about the Junior 
League? 

The Junior League of San Francisco, stepping smartly 
along with the Junior Leagues throughout America, is 
planning something ultra-attractive for its forth-coming 
production. 

According to advance information this year's Junior 
League theatrical presentation will differ from those oj 
preceding events, in many instances. Originality has long 
been the distinguishing attraction of the Burlingame and 
Bay City set, and when the members of this year's com- 
mittees put their heads together, something superlatively 
fine is certain to evolve. 

A chain of luncheons or "vanishing parties" have been 
the vogue for quite some time. These parties have en- 
riched the treasury of the league considerably, and before 
the season draws to a close the San Francisco branch of 
the Junior League Society will be something like $13,699 
the richer. 

At any rate, this is the stipulated amount established 
by the executive committee which met in session at the 
Fairmont Hotel during the first week of July when a con- 
certed plan was defined. 
Vanishing Parties 

The "vanishing parties" are so enjoyable and so tho- 
roughly well worth-while, that, like everything else that 
proves successful, every one is wondering why some one 
didn't think of it before. Here is the plan : 

Seven young ladies entertained at a Junior League lunch- 
eon, each contributing one dollar to the league funds. Then, 
each one of the guests gave a luncheon for six other differ- 
ent friends, all of whom donated a dollar to the fund. So 
the chain goes on until it is scheduled to end with 5040 
young women each entertaining one guest. 

As the sum increases in proportion, the indebtedness <'f 
charitable purposes or deficit decreases or vanishes. The 
plan of the Junior League is not only a most delightful 
one, affording charming events and concerted direction, 
but it provides a successful business venture. 

Mrs. Jerd Sullivan is the new president of the San Fran- 
cisco branch of the Junior League. Miss Lawton Filer 
is the secretary and Mrs. Herbert O'Brien is the treas- 
urer. The board of directors has an interesting personnel, 
including Mrs. Lawrence W. Fox, Mrs. Coy Kilmer, Miss 
Doris Schmieden and Miss Eleanor Morgan. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker is chairman of dramatics. Miss [sa- 
belle Pringle is chairman of entertainments and has many 
clever ideas to introduce. Other department heads are: 
Mrs. James Moffitt, clinics ; Mrs. Henry Washington Dodge, 
sewing; Mrs. Alexander Wilson, membership. Mrs. 
Wakefield Baker is the house manager for the new home 
wdiich the Junior League has established as the result of 
splendid and successful theatricals. 

Mrs. Robert Watt Miller is chairman of the emergencv 
committee. Miss Barbara Ballon, a beautiful young girl, 
daughter of Judge and Mrs. Sidney Ballon, is head of the 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

060 IluHh Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Frnnclnco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHER Proprietor 



follow-up work of the Junior League and conducts with 
executive skill her department work, which is really an 
outstanding principle and purpose of the society. 

You will be interested to know, I'm sure, that Miss 
Catherine Wheeler is chairman of the motor corps. 

The San Francisco branch of the Junior League has a 
most efficient vice-president, upon whom the presiding 
officer and her constituents can depend for capable execu- 
tive work and she is Mrs. Hopper Jackson, first vice-presi- 
dent. 

Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle. Miss Helene Lundborg, Mrs. 
Ralston Page, Mrs. Phillip Foster Brown, Miss Jean How- 
ard and Mrs. Marshall Madison, all of the prominent society 
set, are active participants in the deliberations of the Junior 
League and its far-reaching activities. 

* * * 

Supper and Midnight Revue 

An elaborate supper dance and a midnight revue at one 
of the down-town theaters will probably be the plan adopted 
by the Junior League. According to reports and commit- 
tee sessions of recent intervals, this year's entertainment 
will be more professional in its theatrical endeavor and 
while the ambitious venture may seem, to the unitiated. 
as an imminent and perplexing problem, to those who know 
— this idea opens the way for excellent work and more 
artistic presentation. Besides, say they, who knows but it 
will permit larger financial returns. 

* * * 
Popular Out-of-Doors 

Garden Parties a Fad 

Garden parties, luncheons served out in the open, garden 
grills, picnics de luxe and all manner of attractive events in 
the light of the sun. or neath the flowering shrubbery, are 
seasonable fads. 

It seems the most logical, as well as the most enticing way, 
in which to entertain. This kind of social life i- well known 
in the south. Somehow we, of the north, have been slow in 
following so favorable a fad. 

( iarden dresses, garden chapeaux, parasols, all combine to- 
ward enhancing the loveliness of femininity. These dainty 
possessions of lovely girl or charming matron are best dis- 
played in some garden. 

Country residences in California are renowned for their 
beauty, and hostesses are adepts in bringing forth the best 
of their larders, as well as their personal effects, for such 
alluring occasions. 

Welcome, these out-of-door society affairs! May their num- 
bers increase and participants wax eloquent in appreciation of 
their loveliness. 

Mrs. Frank Crosby, whose home in Fair Oaks Lane, Menlo 
Park, has often been the setting for delightful outdoor lunch- 
eons and garden parties, was hostess, recently, at one of the 
most picturesque out-in-the-open luncheon parties of the season. 

Miss Henrietta Moffitt and her sister. Mrs. Alfred Mc- 
Laughlin, were the complimented guests. 

The luncheon table was placed under a wide spreading tig 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 
i 
j Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CART. S STANLEY 



August 1, 1^25 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



tree in the garden of the Crosby home, and from 
the brandies of the tree depended all manner of 
fresh fruits, wired in among the leaves to give the 
appearance of natural growth. The fruits added 
a colorful touch and also served as a part of the 
menu. The garden has been planned in a color 
scheme of blue and gold this season, and the blue 
and gold of the surrounding blossoms were used 
also in the table decorations, giving a delightfully 
harmonious setting. 

Following a growing fad for the out-of-door 
oven or grill, Mrs. Crosby made her luncheon an 
al fresco affair, serving food hot from a recently- 
installed barbecue oven. These ovens are becom- 
ing a feature of country residences and estates, 
and even the country clubs are installing them 
and making barbecue suppers a part of their out- 
door program. 

Mrs. Crosby's guests included Mrs. Mc- 
Laughlin and Miss Moffitt and Mesdames 
Douglas McBryde, Bode K. Smith, Charles 
Warren Hunt, Sidney Lawrence, John Dresser, 
Otto Crau, Alan Cline, Miss Ruth Gedney. 

* * # 
Tea in Laurel Court 

Mrs. L. E. Gregory, wife of Admiral Gregory, chief of 
the bureau of yards and docks, was the guest of honor at 
an elegant tea given in Laurel Court of the Fairmont Hotel, 
Tuesday afternoon, Miss Mabel Johnson of the hospitality 
committee, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce extending 
the greetings of the city to Mrs. Gregory. 

While in San Francisco Admiral Gregory conferred with 
the naval affairs committee of the Chamber of Commerce 
and visited Mare Island navy yard and other places under 
his jurisdiction. 

Mrs. Gregory is a well-known writer and prominent in 
the literary circles of Washington, I). C, where she is a 
general favorite among the literati as well as in the navy- 
circles, and the diplomatic groups. 

* * * 

Estelle Margaret Swearingen, author of "Pickaninny," 
who has been visiting San Francisco and Berkeley for a 
few days, was the complimented guest at two recent, lit- 
erary events. 

The Sacramento writer was entertained at a luncheon 
when Ruth Harwood. poet and artist, was also a guest, 
preceding her two years' trip to New Mexico, where she 
will be identified with the State Teachers' College in Sil- 
ver City. 

Estelle Swearingen was a guest at the tea given in honor 
of Mrs. Gregory, wife of Admiral Gregory, anil outlined 
some of her plans attending the continued search for tin- 
hero of "Pickanniny" including a trip to Hollywood, where 

she will be entertained by scenario writers. 

* * * 

Marie Hughes MacQuarrie, noted California harpist, w ho 

has been playing before large audiences in New York ( ity. 
Washington. D. C . and in other cities on the way across 
the continent, is expected home within a tew days. During 

her year's sojourn East, Mrs. MacQuarrie has appeared in 

the Hippodrome Theater, the enormous motion picture pal- 
ace, and the Capitol, where the Marie MacQuarrie En- 
semble of Harps has received enthusiastic and substantial 
reception. 

It is the ardent hope of this brilliant young harpist's 
friends that they may be privileged to her her Ensemble 




HUTIiL ( \\ I lOltlll It) 
750 Sutler Street 

San Francisco's Finest 

Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 

Rates: From $2.50 per day 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria. California 

Of, Ut*. C©o«t H<shw»T Holf-o* Bel-OMl Son Frt.nri.ro ond I .. *n S fi.-. 
As Inn of I nwml E»e«ll*nf* 



here in this city, where her great success is 
welcomed by a host of musicians and admirers. 

Society women of the peninsula cities are 
giving vanishing parties, like those of the 
Junior League, for the benefit of the Stanford 
Children's Convalescent Home. 

Mrs. John G. Sutton gave one of the series 
recently at her home at Atherton. Afterward 
with her guests she attended the very success- 
ful tennis tournament at the Menlo Country 
Club. In her party were : 

Mesdames Spencer Buckbee, Henry Suy- 
dam, Charles Warren Hunt, Arthur Sharp, 
William Weir, Henry Monroe. 

Miss Augusta Corey gave one of the van- 
ishing parties for the children's charity last Wed- 
nesday at her home in Palo Alto. 
* * * 

An enjoyable barbecue supper was a feature 
of the social program at the Marin Golf and 
Country Club recently, when a large group of 
club members assembled at a recently in- 
stalled outdoor grill on the golf links. Winfield 
Scott Davis presented the grill to the club, and the supper 
party celebrated its installation. 

Some of the participants in the supper party were : 
Messrs. and Mesdames David Duncan, John Jerrold 
Meiggs, Frank Howard Allen, Milo Robbins, Alan McDon- 
ald. Alan Van Fleet. George Hind. William Sharp, Ray- 
mond Cook. Winfield Sett Davis, Warren D. Clark, Ray- 
mond Ashton, Ralph Palmer, Sinners Peterson. Mrs. John 
I-'.. Cushing. 

Mis>es Lucy Cook Beth Sherwood, 

Messrs. Milieu Griffith, Hamilton Laughlin. 

* * * 
Entertained at Luncheon 

Mrs. Thomas Lennon, wife of Justice Lennon Jf the Su- 
preme Court, was hostess at a luncheon at the Fairmont 
I lotel Monday. 

Her guests were Mrs. \\ . II. Atwell. wife of Grand Ex- 
alted Ruler Atwell of the P.. I'. O. Elks; Mrs. Fanning. 
of Past Grand Exalted Ruler Fanning: Mrs. C. F. 
Nichols, wife of Exalted Ruler Nichols of San Francisco 
Lodge No. .i ; Mrs. E. Davis, whose husband is president 
California state convention; Mrs. Ralph Ilagen. Mrs. 
re F.rlin and Mrs. (I. D. Flahaban. 

* * * 

Dr. Mariana Bertola plans to -,, to Reno for the conven- 
tion of the Western Federation of Women's Clubs, October 
14 and 15. The State Federation this week joined the West- 
ern Federation, which embraces the various Federation 
groups in the Rocky Mountain and Coast States. The 
Southern district of the State Federation has announced 
invention elate-- as November 17 to 20. Beginning 
( October 1. Dr. Bertola will start her rounds of visits to the 

district federations. She has reserved the first week in 
December for the San Francisco district. 



Vpple— The orchestra is playing "Tea for Two." 
lack — No. that is "Follow the Swallow." 
"Well, anyhow, I knew it had something to do with drink- 
— Pcnn Punch Bowl. 



Ding! Ding! 
Mary — John, take y air arm from around my neck — and 
you a transfer to the belt line. — V M. I. Sniper. 



W*» *r wrtf« far r»t^rm»nM •* ] 



: Irtp mm t k. 



AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
mine pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN. Agua Caliente. Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1. 1925 



*®J>£&~ 



•ewwe* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



«^5.e^s*» 



=/f* 




t: 



'HE opening of the New Harding Memo- 
rial Golf Course at Harding Park, in In- 

gleside. proved to be one of the greatest events 

in outdoor sports that has ever been recorded 

in the world in point of entries. 

No less than 2116 players, composed of men, 

women and juniors, competed for upwards of 

100 trophies. 

From the moment that William F. Hum- 
phrey, vice-president of the Park Board, and Frank Foran, 
secretary of the Olympic Club, drove the first ball at 5:30, 
Saturday morning, July 18th, which declared the new course 
open there were numerous records set and broken during the 
next nine days of tournament play. To George Ritchie, 
former northern California golf champion, goes the palm. 
Ritchie made so many records and broke them again that 
it was hard to keep track of them. Ritchie tied with Stan- 
ton Haight and Ed Bogle for low medal in the qualifying 
round, with a card of 75 ; then, during the match play 
rounds, Ritchie had a 74, and later a 7i. Then in the play- 
off between Haight and Bogle, he broke his own two pre- 
vious records by playing the course in 71, two under the 
par of the course, his card reading 34-37-71 ; leading his two 
opponents Haight 79. and Bogle 80, thus establishing a rec- 
ord that is liable to stand for years to come. 

The woman's city championship was won by Mrs. Frank 
Sheedy, who captured this honored crown for the second 
time in succession. By winning this title, Mrs. Sheedy 
proved that she is the greatest woman golfer in the north- 
ern part of the state and her match with Mrs. Brent Potter 
of San Jose, a former title holder, was full of clever plays 
and perfect golf. 

Mrs. Sheedy has perfected a pitch-and-run shot that is 
played to perfection. Her tee shots are low and true, and 
her approaching has no equal among the women. 

During the final match with Mrs. Potter, Mrs. Sheedy 
proved one thing: that her card of 88 included every known 
shot in her ball, and for anyone to state they could beat 
that score would be utterly ridiculous. With all due re- 
spect to Mrs. Sheedy. the winner. Mrs. Potter played some 
wonderful holes, but her weakness lay on the greens, her 
putter refusing to respond. Mrs. Louis Lengfeld. captain 
of the Beresford Club, who refereed the match, claimed that 
Mrs. Sheedy's golf equaled that of Miss Glena Collett, and 
Mrs. Lengfeld ought to know, as she has seen and played 
with the best of them. 

A Carpenter-Golfer 

When Ed Bogle of Oakland, the newly crowned city 
champion, stepped on the tee with George Ritchie, the Bul- 
letin champion. Bogle looked like a 50 to 1 shot, as outside 
of his qualifying with Stanton Haight and George Ritchie, 
as medalist, his work had been nothing sensational, but 
once he got in action a remarkable change took place. 

The way he set about his work reminded one of lim 
Barnes, the world's champion, on the other hand. Ritchie 
must have thought all he had to do was to walk around for 
about fourteen holes and that then it would be all over. 

It was another case of too much confidence, the first thin- 
little George knew was that he was three down, and try as 
he would he couldn't overcome the handicap. 

They say that Bogle is a carpenter by profession and that 
he only plays golf occasionally and when he does, it is at 



Lincoln Park, although he lives in Oakland. The strange 
part about the whole affair is. that he burst into this tourna- 
ment unheralded. Nobody we met had ever seen or played 
golf with him before. If what they say is true, then we may 
expect that Bogle will develop into a world beater, if his 
work against Ritchie was a true sample of what a golfer 
can do with little or no practice. 

* * * 
Conroy Opens Champ 

Russ Conroy, professional at Emerald Lake Golf and 
Country Club, carried off the open championship of San 
Francisco by easily defeating Ed Bogle, the city champion. 
in an 18-hole match, winning 4-3. Conroy earned the dis- 
tinction to meet Bogle for the open title by leading 56 mem- 
bers of the Northern California Professional Golf Associa- 
tion in the qualifying round, which he won with a card of 
74, while Bogle qualified by defeating George Ritchie in 
the finals for the city championship. 

Bogle was favored to win the crown on his showing of the 
previous day. when he upset the dope by defeating George 
Ritchie, the favorite: but when he hitched up with Russ 
Conroy, he lost everything he ever knew and was in trouble 
most of the time. 

His only two signs of life were when he made an eagle on 
the 10th and halved the 12th with a birdie: outside of this 
he played lamentably. < >n the other hand, although Conro) 
wasn't breaking any course records, he was getting his pars, 
collecting eight in the fourteen holes played. 



New Municipal Links 

Herbert Fleishhacker, president of the Park Board; Wil- 
liam F. Humphrey, vice-president, and John McLaren, su- 
perintendent of parks, are to be congratulated on the wonder- 
ful work of giving the tax payers of our citv a municipal 
golf course that has no equal in the state 

The New Harding Memorial Golf Links was the talk of 
all those who were fortunate to play over it during golf 
week. 

The tournament was well handled by Roger D. Lapham, 
chairman: Captain Lamb, vice-chairman; Bobby Eyre, 
Louis Welch and Henry Roberts, handicappers. Bobb) 
Eyre was the real man behind the gun for he never shirked 
his duty from the moment the tournament started until the 
close. 

Bob, had more pep the last day than anyone on the job, 
he announced the trophy winners, gave each one a cheery 
word and thanked them "for the part they had taken in mak- 
ing the tournament a success. Then Sir Robert turned the 
presentation of the prizes over to Tavlor Holmes, the actor, 
and Kenneth Beaton (K. C. B.l. who gave the thousand 
onlookers many a good laugh when they presented the 
trophies to the lucky winners. 



A woman was recently fined for talking too loudly in a the- 
ater. Complaints were made, we understand, by crossword 

solvers in the stalls. — London Opinion 



* * 

She — What a beautiful mouth vol 
a girl. 

He— It is, as much as possible— Denver 1'anakect 



you have. It ought to be on 



August 1. 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



£&£, 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 

"Bulletin" wil 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

Radio fans throughout the entire world 
will be interested in the launching of the 
new station KTAB which is being installed 
Saturday August 1st, backed by the San 
Francisco "Bulletin," Through an arrange- 
ment consummated several weeks ago, the 
be associated with the new $35,000 1000-watt 
Western Electric unit in the Tenth Avenue Baptist Church, 
Oakland. 

Han-old Castle Macquarrie is the managing director of 
this new radio station and being well qualified for execu- 
tive work, particularly in electrical and radio management. 
Mr. .Macquarrie will be right in his element. Gifted with 
a keen appreciation of worth-while events and a high stand- 
ard of artistic work, this young director will, no doubt, in- 
crease the clientele of the new broadcasting station. He lias 
long been connected with the Associated Press and has 
technical knowledge regarding electrical appliances. Mr. 
MacQuarrie is an artist, also, of recognition and has spon- 
sored some of the best programs of local presentation. 

Ada Morgan O'Brien, radio expert and impresario, known 
throughout radio land, has been selected as station direc- 
tor, Mrs. O'Brien has a host of ardent friends who value 
her excellent judgment and standards of program offerings. 
Rev. Alexander Allen, rector of St. John'.- Episcopal 
Church, will deliver the dedicatory prayer the opening night 
of the new radio station. Colonel J. F. Dillon, federal radii' 
supervisor for the sixth United State- district, will officiall) 
welcome the new station. The Pasmore Trio will present 
the incidental music. 

Charles S. Stanton, publisher of the "Bulletin" will Out 
line the paper's association with the new radio station, 
Arthur H. Halloran, editor of "Radio" and "Radiocast 
Weekly," will give an address and I-'.. M. Sargent, president 
of the Alameda County Radio Dealer-' Association spon- 
soring the station, will -peak. 

L. R. Tucker, the original "big brother." will be a regular 

feature of the programs over KTAB, The formal dedica- 
tion of the new station will take place on Sunday, August 
2nd at the morning services. I >n that occasion a vesoer 
hymn written by Dean Wilbur Gresham of Grace Cathe- 
dral, will be sung by the choir of KT VB. 

The initial program Saturday night, which will enter ether 

lane under auspicious supervision, will include composi- 
tions l>\ California composers. Uda Waldrop, Mar) Carr 

Moore and dene Hay-on. being the lir-t of these musicians 

to be heard. 

* * * 

Prominent Citizens of 
Mission to Assemble 
Prominent citizens oi the Mission district, affiil 

the Mission Street Merchant-' Association, will provide en- 
tertainment lor 1000 guests expected at their seventh an- 
nual picnic and outdoor frolic, to take place on August 9 
at last Shore. Richmond. Contra Costa County. 

(,u- Lachman, president of the Mission Street Merchant-' 

mtinued on rag. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

Mrs. A. W. Scott, whose gracious hospitality has been the 
occasion for many memorable affairs, entertained a group of 
friends last Friday at a luncheon given at the Fairmont 
Hotel, in the Venetian ballroom, in compliment to Mrs. 
Stubblefield. 

As soon as the guests were seated, the charming hostess 
presented her honor guest and told them of Mrs. Stubble- 
field's contemplated world tour. Known in Washington, 
D. C, and in New York City as well as in this city, Mrs. 
Stubblefield will be the complimented guest at many simi- 
lar events before her return to this city, according to inter- 
esting plans defined by the hostess at the delightful 
luncheon. 

Corsage bouquets of varying colorings formed the table 
decoration and were afterwards presented to each guest. 
Dainty place cards painted by a young San Francisco artist, 
Miss Madeline Miller, designated the seating arrangement. 

Mrs. Scott's guests included: Mesdames G. E. Miller, 
Davis Louderback, Paul Smith, John Marone, H. Bethi- 
aume, W. Harold Wilson and the Misses Madeline Miller 
and Lydia Collier of Nevada. 



U. C. Appointment 

Club women generally are interested in the announcement 
that Mrs. Frank I'".. Hickley, wife of Professor Hickley of 
the University of California, has been appointed chairman 
of the Department of International Relations. 

Mrs. Hickley has been in close touch with the work of 
her husband, who practices international law in San Fran- 
cisco, and who is frequently called to Washington. D. C, 
on conferences of international relationship. The Hick- 
lex- have -pent ten year- in the Orient, knowing China 
well, and are world travelers. 



A San Francisco girl has been chosen president of the Vo- 
cational Art- Teacher Training Association at the Univer- 
-ity of California. The new head of the organization is 
Miss Mabel C. Tadich, formerly secretary-treasurer of the 
organization, and identified with Cap and Bells and other 
local club organization-. 

The daughter of a prominent club woman. Mi-s Tadich 
plans to guide her organization through many important 
activities. The fir-t of these occurred last Wednesday when 
the association entertained at a "One-hour Musicale." at 
Memorial Hall. Stephen Union. Mis- Tadich was chair- 
man of the program and the reception committee included 
Mi-- Mary Hoover. Miss I. B. Bahrs. Mrs. C. M. Morri- 
son. Mrs. I. H Reid and Mrs. M. L. Yorke. Taking part in 
'he program were John Francis Violich, Grace Adams East, 
Smith, Claire Harsha Upshur and Ruby Cora Tadich. 

The second activity is the campaign which the organiza- 
tion will launch to place the social affairs of the department 
on a firm financial basis. It wants to raise adequate funds 
to meet the need- of several summer programs, and to 
secure complete equipment for its social parlors and kitchen 
at 304 Haviland Hall. 

attuned on Page 






12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1925 




Palm Canyon National Monument. One of the scenic districts of the state. 



I'HOTU HV NVIKlN.VL .MIOMOBlIf IIIH KEWS HI HI i\ 



A JUBILEE TOUR 

By E. V. Weller, 
National Automobile Club 



CALIFORNIA road conditions now 
permit a considerable range during 
the vacation period and if the motorist 
desires to make a real Cook's tour of 
the state which will include all of the 
scenic attractions as well as most of the 
historic and romantic points, he may 
do so within the time allotted without 
discomfort and without too much of a 
travel strain. 

A trip of this sort might well be 
called California's jubilee tour, as it 
furnishes an opportunity for a com- 
prehensive survey of California's his- 
torical background, its wealth of 
legend, its literary record and its color- 
ful tales of romance. 

Starting from San Francisco on the 
first day's journey, the jubilee tour 
should include a trip down the Great 
Highway, a turn off at Redwood City 
and a run through the Big Tree Groves 
of La Honda to the Coast Highway 
at San Gregorio, which may be fol- 
lowed down as far as Santa Cruz. 



where a \ Lit should be paid t" the State 
Redwood Park alTd the Big Tree Grove 
at Fellon. Continuing south along the 
( Icean Shore road, the motorist passes 
through Watsonville and reaches Mon- 
terey, the first capital of California, 
where he may enjoy a glorious day of 
scenic pleasure ami historical interest 
by visiting the relics preserved in one 
of California's oldest cities, and drive 
over the famous Seventeen-Mile Drive, 
which is included in the Circle of En- 
chantment. 

The return is then made to Salinas 
and the southern section of the Pacific 
Highway, known in the early days as 
El Camino Real He may turn ofif at 
San Lucas if he does not wish to in- 
clude a visit to the southern missions 
and the scenic districts that lie about 
Los Angeles and San Diego and drive 
over the lateral which comes into the 
valley route near Visalia. Or, he may 
continue south by way of San Luis 
( Ibispo and Santa Barbara and con- 



tinue to San Diego over the same trail 
made famous by the establishment of 
the Franciscan Missions when Califor- 
nia was in the process of civilization. 
A paved road will lead him from San 
Diego through the picturesque moun- 
tains that served as a background for 
Helen Hunt Jackson's "Ramona" and 
Peter B. Kync's "The Pride of Palo- 
mar" into the rich district of Imperial 
Valley, along the edge of the Salton 
Sea, through Palm Springs, Beaumont 
and San Bernardino, where he may 
take one of the world's most famous 
drives over the "101-Mile Rim of the 
World" route which circles Big Bear 
Lake and the scenic district of the 
southern Sierra. Here, he has a choice 
in proceeding northward of following 
the Foothill Boulevard by way of 
Claremont. Monrovia and Sierra 
Madre, or proceeding over the Cajon 
Pass by way of Victorville to Bar- 
stow, swinging westward again to 
Mojave, where a visit should be paid 



August 1, 1925 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

to Red Rock Canyon which yliesj 
twenty-six miles to the north. 

Another choice of routes is encoun- 
tered at Mojave. Here, you may go| 
direct to Bakersfield and north to Vi-| 
salia and visit the General Grant and 
Sequoia National Parks or follow the 
scenic boulevard that reaches into the) 
wilderness of the Grand Canyons ofl 
the Kings and the Kern, by way ofl 
( )wens River Valley and Owens Lake, 
through Independence, Big Pine and 
Bishop, under the shadow of Mt. Whit-B 
ney to the edge of Mono Lake, where! 
he connects with the Tioga Pass routes 
which links the Yosemite National! 
Park with Tahoe, the Lake of the Sky.'} 
At Mono Lake he may proceed into the 
Yosemite Valley and out again by way 
of the Big Oak Flat road into the Bret 
Harte country which extends from So- 
nora to Grass Valley. 

Much of the interesting district of 
the days of '49, with its iron-shuttered 
buildings and its picturesque "cities 
that were." lies between Sonora and 
Placerville over a fair mountain road 
and at Placerville he will find himself 
on one of the main routes to Tahoe. 
From Tahoe he may swing wot again 
and south over the Auburn route, pass- 
ing the historic region of Donner Lake 
and the beautiful sweep of the Truckee 
River and the south fork of the Yuba. 
Or, he may continue north to Sierra- 
ville and the Feather River country and 
visit the strange reservation which sur- 
rounds Lassen Volcanic National Park. 
From this point he may swing to the 
east over the Alturas Highway and 
continue over the Oregon line to Kla- 
math Falls, or proceed northward over 
the Pacific Highway by way of Red 
Bluff and Redding to the snow-capped 
peak of Shasta, which stands as a senti- 
iel at the Oregon line. The Klamath River 
Highway then permits him to motor 
through the wilds of Trinity County to 
the magnificent stretches of the north- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

ern Pacific coast, into the region of the 
Redwood Groves that line the Red- 
wood Highway. 

Return may be made by way of Eu- 
reka and Ukiah with a short detour 
from this point for the purpose of visit- 
ing Clear Lake and another detour at 
Santa Rosa to permit a visit to Fort 
Ross, scene of the Russian occupation 
of California ; the Russian River coun- 
try, Drake's Bay and to circle through 
the beautiful hills and valleys of Marin 
County. Then he may swing to the 
■ north again and tour through the Napa 
Valley, cross the Carquinez Straits, in- 
clude a tour of Contra Costa and Ala- 
meda County and circle the bay to San 
Francisco again. 

This is a tour which gives the mo- 
torist a remarkable picture of the op- 
portunities presented to the motorist 
by California. It is a tour particularly 
attractive, since this is California's 
Diamond Jubilee Year, and an ac- 
quaintance with the wonders of the 
state in which you live is one of the 
important elements in adding to your 
enjoyment and providing you with 
memories of pleasant days afield. 



"Good heavens! Who gave you that 
black eye?" 

"A bridegroom — for kissing the bride 
after the ceremony." 

"But surely he didn't object to that 
ancient custom ?" 

"No — hut it was two years after the 
ceremony." — London Mail. 



When your eyesight commences to 
blur you should use stronger glasses 
but weaker drinks. — Judge. 



"I must bottle up my grief." said the 
movie star as she corked the glycerine 
bottle. — Judge. 



Masquerade 

Abashed One (after succumbing to 
a surprise kiss)- Aren't you a bit fa- 
miliar! 

Unabashed One (just returned from 
a long absence) — Anne, to think that 
you still remember. — Cornell Widow. 



Love may be blind, but he's usually 

good at figures. — Colorado noil,,. 



Mary had a William goat — 

It was an awful mutt : 
She always called him "Nearly," 

Because he was all butt. — Wes- 
leyan Wasp. 



Dumb — Do you know that seven- 
teen thousand, twelve hundred and 
eighty-two elephants were needed to 
make billiard balls last year. 

Dora — My, oh. my. isn't it wonder- 
ful that such big i>easts can be taught 
such exacting works? — Williams Pur- 
ple Cow. 



13 

Answer This One 

Do they make the docks to fit the 
ferry boats or do they make the ferry- 
boats to fit the docks? 



Oacn car ojberated 
6y reiiah/e 

Chauffeurs 

u/Ao morouoiilg under 
stand their Aus/ftess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 





Phone Grnystone 270 

1029 Pine Street 

San Francisco 



Attention Club Members! 



Have 
You 
Sampled 
a 
Club 
Business 
Lunch 
at 
SINGLE- 
TON'S 
ALLEY 

CAT 

LUNCH 

INN? 



Delicious, Dainty and Decidedly Different. 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXtON ' 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 
SAM FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1925 




SALT is a valuable and necessary commodity. A report 
from the Department of Commerce gives the follow- 
ing information with respect to its production : 

New York ranks first among the salt-producing states, 
its output amounting to 1,972,808 short tons: Michigan 
with a production of 1,918,463 tons, is second; Ohio, with 
a production of 1.102,214 tons, ranks third. The other 
principal salt-producing states are Kansas, with an output 
of 794,303 short tons; Louisiana with 383.104 tons, and 
California with 268,112 tons. 

* * * 

There is now a helium division of the Bureau of Mines 
Department of Commerce. It has five sections, the most 
important of which to the public is the Natural (..as Sec- 
tion, which handles the work relating to the transportation, 
production, conservation and analysis of helium bearing 
natural gas. A few years ago it was practically unheard o1 . 

* * * 

Where two or more insurance companies back an under- 
writer's policy and assume the liability jointly and sever- 
ally, it is sufficient under the new California underwriters 
annex law to indicate on the face of the policy that the 
liability assumed by each company is 100 per cent, accord- 
ing to the opinion rendered to the insurance department 
by Deputy Attorney-General John H. Diordan. 

* * * 

Totalling $3,244,289, San Francisco fire premiums for the 
first six months of the year show an increase of $500,263 
over the volume for the similar period of last year. 

* * * 

Insurance on the life of a majority stockholder in a 
corporation payable to a corporation, in the event o! his 
death, may be "included only to the extent of the cash sur- 
render value in appraising the assets of the firm for inheri- 
tance tax purposes, according to Surrogate John F. O'Brien 

of New York. 

* * * 

A controversy has arisen between the Nevada Irrigation 
District and the Yuba River Power Company with respect 
to the proposed development of Yuba River hydro-electric 
power. Financiers declare that without the power develop- 
ment there is a chance of the irrigation scheme nut being 
a success. The Federal Power Commission intimates that 
its decision will be against the irrigation district and an 
injunction has been issued pending trial. This may affect 
the validity of the bonds. 

* * * 

The American Bank, in a review of California conditions, 
considers them as being verv promising. The total value 
of the crops is estimated at 371 millions at least, which was 
the amount realized last year. And as a result there will 
be a stimulation of business in the state. 

* * * 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company has declared regular 
quarterly dividend No. 44 of $1.50 per share on its first pre- 
ferred 6 per cent stock, payable August 15th to holders of 
record July 31st. 

* * * 

Southern Pacific Company's net railway operating income 
for June shows an increase of $147,420.42, compared with 
the income for the same month of the preceding year. 

* * # 

Business is improving in the Bay District. Dun's Review- 
says the conditions throughout our district are generally 
good. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolida tlons with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 479,081.25 

MISSION BRANCH-' Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1CHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4}4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



San Pranciflco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE 
Manager 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



444 Market St. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital *20,©00,0OO $20,000,000 Reaerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD 
Aa.t. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin StSan Francisco, Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS, FLUMES, 



PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 
Snn Francisco, Calif. Lob Angeles, Calif. 

S717 Santa Fe ATenne 



W. W. HEALEY | 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco t 
Phone Kearny 391 ! 



August I. 192S 



SAN FRANCISO i NEWS LETTER 



l.i 



MEN AND THEIR BIG EVENTS 

(Continued from Page 11) 
Association, has appointed a capable committee for the gala 
event, with novel entertainment plans interspersing the pic- 
nic. J. C. Marshall, secretary of the Mission Merchants' As- 
sociation, and Dave Cohen, committee chairman, are pre- 
paring the program. 

Special features include a water melon eating contest, 
games of baseball, a tug-of-\var, racing contests for mar- 
ried couples and single people, and dancing in the pavilion. 
The merchants of the Mission have contributed 250 gifts for 
competitors in the games. 

Three social events during the entire calendar year are 
permitted to interrupt the business of the Mission Street 
Merchants' Association. These include the annual picnic, 
which is being staged for August 9 of this year. Their an- 
niversary banquet and their Christmas jinks are the remain- 
ing two diversions. Parking space for the automobiles at 
the picnic has been provided for guests. A special boat 
will transport the Mission Street merchants to the Oakland 
pier. 

WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from Page 11) 
George H. Thomas Circle No. 32, Ladies of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, celebrated its twenty-second anni- 
versary on July 23 with a luncheon held at Hotel Stewart. 
Mrs. Maybell Plymire, national president of the Daughters 
of Veterans, made an address, while Mrs. Addie L. Fleming 
of Sacramento, department president of the Ladies' ( '•. A. R., 
and Mrs. Harriet Finch, department secretary, contributed 
short talks. The history of the circle was given by Lucy M. 
Vining, past president and secretary. John C. Chapman 
and Colonel A. J. Vining were present. 



List of Arrivals at Feather River Inn, Week Ending 
July 26th, 1925 
Tuesday, July 21 
Mrs. Henry S. Manheim, San Francisco; Mrs. David 
Eisenbach, San Francisco; Dr. F. C. Bull, San Francisco; Mr. 
ami Mrs. S. J. Johnson. San Francisco : Mr. and Mrs. M. (_'. 1 )il- 
lingham, San Francisco; Dr. J. E. Gilcreest, wife and Miss 
Gertrude Gilcreest. Ennis, Tex.; Mrs. John B, Metcalf, Pied- 
mont; Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Montagne and family, Menlo 
Park. 

Wednesday, July 22 
James D. Phelan and party, consisting of toll,, wing, all 
from San Francisco : 

John Parrott, Noel Sullivan. Mrs. J. D. Harvey, Mrs. 
Oscar Cooper, Miss Jane Cooper; Mr-. Frank Wadleigh, 
Los Angeles; Miss Vena Wadleigh, Los Angeles; Miss 
Eugenia McQuatters, Los Angeles 

Thursday, July 23 
David I.. Levy, San Francisco. 

Friday, July 24 
Mr, and Mrs Ben W. Reed. San Francisco; Miss Elva 
Reed and Ken \Y. Reed, Jr., San Francisco; Mr. ami Mr-, 
< >ti- <;. O'Brien, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs, Frank H. 
Fries. San Francisco; Mr, William Fries, San Fran 
Master William and Frank 11. Fries, Jr., San Francisco; 
Mrs. A. E. Burdick, San Francisco; Mrs. 1-".. 11. Davis, San 
Francisco ; Mrs. John J. Kyne, San Francisco ; Miss Gretchen 
Kyne, San Francisco; Mr. anil Mrs. Spencer Brush, San 
Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Willis O'Brien, San Francisco; 
Mr and Mr-. P. 11. Palchin and children, San Francisco. 
Saturday. July 25 
Lloyd Gibbs Howard. San Francisco; Charles H. Coats, 
San Francisco; Mrs. Max Blum ami Freida Blum, San 
Joseph 1.. Raiva. San Francisco, 

Weekly Events at Los Angeles Hotels 
The Hotel Alexandria had a busy week, from Jul} 
to July 31st, entertaining in its various parlors, several im- 



portant clubs, associations and commercial organizations. 
The evening of July 27th, the Equitable Life Assurance 
Company met to discuss various questions; the Casualty 
Underwriters' Association met the morning of July 2Sth. in 
Parlor F, while at noon a luncheon was given in Parlor E 
to the Southern California Forward Movement. Other 
luncheons were given by the Democratic Club, on July 30th, 
by the Title Insurance Company, and the Phi Kappa Pai, 
nn July 31st. Altogether it was a period of quite a little 
business importance. 

The Hotel Ambassador, on the other hand, indulged in 
a week of social gayety, beginning with the Symphony 
Concert, which took place on July 26th; a "Special Night" 
held in Cocoanut Grove, on the same evening ; a house 
bridge party on July 30th, a college night, July 31st, and 
on the morning of August 1st, an afternoon tea dance will 
be given in the Orange Room, while another "Special 
Night" will be staged in the evening of the same date. 

These two leading hotels of the southern metropolis are 
always dated up with notable events, whether of a cultural, 
social, musical, or commercial nature, and are the ren- 
dezvous of all the prominent people in town or out. 

^CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

Nightly 

Jack Holland and Miss Jean Barry 

in 

REVUE 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 7 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the** 

VALLFYo/ the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks IT'if/i Mushrooms." 

Clean Room*. Clem Linen, Clean Everything 

Vim I ^nnnma County 't Farnou. Retorts and Mineral (¥«rm Wader) Swimminj 
Ta»lc» From Thi» Hotel. 

Rate* Exceptionally Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 



I 



FETTERS' HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. .Mas- 
seur in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming 
pool Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Rates, $18 up. 
Write George Fetters, Mgr.. or Peck-Judah. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 



UhosEKeat 



Shirts 

Pajamas 

Night Robes 



HhosEKeni 

W 7 



1 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
2* Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



! GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sis.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



:i 



1G 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1925 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
Columbia 

Blanche Bates, assisted by Charles Waldron and a fine 
company of capable players are nightly delighting crowds 
at the Columbia with one of the season's best comedies, 
"Mrs. Partridge Presents ." 

Following Miss Bates into the Columbia, comes Frank 
Keenan on August 10th with a brand new play, now in 
rehearsal. "Smiling Danger" which will be given its world 
premiere here. 

This popular actor's last success, :" Peter Weston," was 

produced at the Alcazar two years ago. He declares his 

new play will give him the best opportunity of his career, 

for it has a heavy dramatic role well suited to his delivery 

and temperament. 

* * * 

Sangerfest 

Gertrude Weidemann, young soprano from Berlin and 
Arnold Gabor, young baritone who sang at the Metropoli- 
tan Opera last season will be heard together as soloists in 
"Bruch's "Fair Ellen" a cantata for mixed voices at the 
second Sangerfest concert, Sunday evening. August 16th. 
They will be supported by a mixed chorus of 800 voices, 
the largest chorus ever heard in this city, and the Sanger- 
fest Symphony Orchestra. 



Concerning Prohibition 

This is what St. Chrysostom wrote concerning orgies of 
drunkenness : 

"I hear men cry when these deplorable abuses happen. 
'Would to God there were no wine.' What folly! What 
madness! When other men sin you find fault with the 
gifts of God. What insanity is this ! Is it the wine that 
causes the abuse? No, it is not the wine but the intem- 
perance of those who take an evil delight in it. But rather 
cry out, 'Would to God there were no drunkenness.' If 
you shout, 'Would that there were no wine,' you should 
add, 'Would that there were no iron because of the mur- 
derers; would that there were no night because of the 
thieves; would that there were no light because of the in- 
formers ; would that there were no women because of the 
adulteresses.' In this way you would destroy everything. 
This is a devilish way of thinking." 

Dr. E. A. Waason, who describes prohibition as "a move- 
ment to put the church in control of the state." also writes: 
"This is pure theocracy, such as was the ideal (if the Middle 
Ages. We supposed we had got beyond all that ; but here 
it is, facing us again in the twentieth century, in America! 
The world moves — in a circle!" 



What It Showed 

Sunday School Teacher — Then all the people fell down 
before the king. What does that show? 

The Kid — That de king could stand his liquor better'n 
any of them. 



A royal document found in an ancient Egyptian tomb was 
signed "Sneferuw." Even in the days of the Pharaohs the 
touch system of typewriting must have been in vogue. 



He (finishing slightly off-color joke) — Do you see the 
point? 

She — If it's what I think it is, I don't and you're no gentle- 
man. — C. C. N. Y. Mercury. 




What to do 
if 

all lights go out 



If your neighbor has lights, it prob- 
ably means that one or both of your 
main fuses have burned out. The 
fuses are usually located near the 
Electric Meter. 



Open the main switch and unscrew 
the fuse and remove it from the socket. 
As it is convenient to do this yourself, 
keep a supply of fuses on hand, for this 
will prevent your being without light 
while waiting for a service man or elec- 
trician. 

After you have replaced a fuse, if it 
blows again at once, call an electrician. 
You can buy fuses at nearly all electrical 
and hardware stores. In cases of emerg- 
ency where you are unable to get a fuse 
quickly, call the P. G. and E. service 
man. No charge is made for the service 
man's time — only the fuse is charged 
for. 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



20-825 



"PACIFIC SERVICE 



i* 



August 1, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



1/ 



Mr. Blabbitt on the Jubilee 



THERE'S one thing sure about jubilees — they can't 
come too often to suit Californians. Once in seventy- 
five years isn't running a thing in the ground and, even if 
it is, it's better than propping it up on the surface — with 
the danger of hot air blasts, from some other quarter, top- 
pling it over. A jubilee is more than a jubilee when it is 
a Diamond Jubilee. 

You know, there are so many ways of looking at a dia- 
mond — every facet gives a more sparkling glint, every cor- 
ner, more beautiful coloring. That is going to be the way 
with California's and San Francisco's first great celebra- 
tion since the Portola — back in the days when all drinkable 
liquids weren't in rivers, wells and bonded warehouses. The 
only drawback to the coming Diamond Jubilee will be that 
we will have to put up with faucets, instead of facets, from 
which cold, if not charged, water will flow. 

Nothing, in the way of celebrations, has ever been found 
to equal California's and, particularly, San Francisco's way 
of entertaining and regaling. In most parts of the country, 
one or two days of parades, speeches, balls and dinners are 
enough to satisfy hosts, hostesses and guests. Here every- 
thing is different, and the Diamond Jubilee, with the inclu- 
sive dates of September 5 to 12, proves the pudding. 

Everyone and every organization is making preparations 
for the great series of events planned, with the same gusto 
and eclat that is, in most places, shown at twelve o'clock 
on New Year's Eve. Cards, blotters, folders and letters have 
already been drawn and printed and are being mailed to 
every city and town in the Union — let alone, every country 
in the world. I am safe in saying that the people who are 
to pay us a jubilee visit will send out an equal amount of 
favorable literature, through the local post office, run by 
a Mr. Powers, to the folks who are taking care of things 
around their places, at home. 

San Francisco is a safe place for jubilee motorists to visit, 
so long as they don't turn to the left on Market Street or 
run up or down Pine and Bush streets the wrong way at 
the right time of day. 

Then, again, it isn't every city that can "Her a round-trip 
jubilee, salt water voyage for thirty-six cent.- and provide 
enough to see on dry land to keep the most indefatigable 
jubilee tourist amused tor a solid month. 

Visitors should remember that there i- a l"t t" see farther 
on than the point of termination of Powell at Market Street. 

I'll have to admit, however, that male visitors can see far- 
ther on Powell street than on any other thoroughfare in 
the world, except certain one- in Wearumhigha. Africa. 
This, in itself, is worth a ticket and a pair of spectacles. 

The turn-table at Powell and Market is enough to turn 
any man's head. 

\- for eating? The city is full of pood restaurants. In 
fact, a person can't utter a big word here but what some- 
one says. "Yes, that's a good place to eat!" 

It is easy to pet acquainted in San Francisco, foi 
city lias more telephone-, in proportion to population, than 
any other metropolis in the world. Where there are th< 
most telephones, there are the most telephone number-. I l| 
what use are friends? 

San Francisco- -treet cars are speedy, and neither the 
Municipal or Market Street Railw.n line- carry sleep: 
dining cars. The boundaries of this city aren't exceptionally 
wide, but the people are certainly broadminded. 

San Francisco is hilly, in -pot- local girls have the pret- 



tiest shaped calves to be found anywhere. California calves 
feed on hillsides. 

Fog? There is nothing to it. Anyway, isn't London next 
to the largest city in the world? 

Oh, San Francisco is a great city, with a great population, 
and there is one thing sure about Diamond Jubilee crowds 
— they can't come in too large numbers or stay too lung! 

Page the great Kohinoor. 



Graney 's 
Billiard Parlor 



The Finest in the World 



924 Market Street 



San Francisco 



Thoroughly Modern Equipment • 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co* 

"The Recommended Laundry" t 

250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 ( 



Vjfftt Mot0f Qili 

Are recognized by the highest authorities In engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angeles 





ir.i.. fhavki.iv MM 

Melnl \\,,rk Apper- 
taining to Aotumo- 
hllf-M — Oxy- Acetylene 
Welding — niack- 
Mmlthlnc. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE VOIR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Raff*. nr»c per day; 97.SO per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floora for Serrlce and Storage of Aatomobllea 



18 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

The pioneer publishing firm of New 
York. D. Appleton and Company, who is 
this year observing its centenary, an- 
nounces that Frederick Roy Martin, for- 
merly general manager of the Associated 
Press, has become vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of this company. 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 
San Francisco — IlurllnRame 

West, 783 478 



Phone Sutter 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

{formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San FrnnclMco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



The Original Economist 
Adam — Can't you make that fig leaf 
last another season ? — Judge. 

* * * 

Figure This Out 

Where do the cats go when they're 
out at night in Venice? — Lafavette 
Lyre. 

* * * 

"Were you bashful the first time 
you called on a girl ?" 

"Why, yes, but her father helped me 
out." — Pitt Panther. 

No. 14G.330 

SUMMONS 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint 
filed in the office of the County Clerk of said 
City and County. 

Frederick Marriott. Plaintiff, vs. N. F. Wil- 
son. Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to: N. F. Wilson, Defendant. 

You are hereby directed to appear and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 
above, brought against you in the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, within 
ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and County 
or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money 
or damages demanded in the complaint as 
arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for any other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the Su- 
perior Court nt the City and County of San 
Francises, Stair ,,f California. 

Dated April 30, 1924. 

[Seal] H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAGNKTTll,. 

AUSTIN LEWIS, Attorney for "plaintiff; 172 
Mills Building, San Francisco. California. 



NOTICE TO i It 1 : 1 > I I iiiiv 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. No. 41, 989. 
Dept. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. .1. Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
John Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
deci ■(■nt, to me them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and (or the City and 
County of Pan Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with Hie necessary vouchers within four (4) 
months alter the first publication of this no- 
tlce in the said administrator, at his office. 
*r,s Phelan Building, San Francisco. Cali- 
ornia, which said last-named office the under- 
signed selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of John 
t iliver, deceased. 

TV. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California. July 7. 
1925. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY, 
Attorneys for Administrator, 



August 1, 1925 

"You know Archie? He beats his 
wife up every morning." 

"You don't say!" 

"Yes. He gets up at eight, and >'io 
gets up at nine." — Columbia Jester. 




The longer p t 



©well' 



HATIONAl CREST 



-the better it gets- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cupM were served at the Pan- 
ama Pad Ho International ExpoaJtlon 



T N h a e me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther ft be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete sat 1 sf ac- 
tion. There Is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or at*- 



miMJ^:KJd:ljmL-ll J, u " s e a r m P ?e 8 ah0W 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 





111 CABIN STEAMERS FROM 
NEW YORK 

Direct Sailing! via Panama Canal 
THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

570 Market St.. San Frut.ri.ro 




WHERE TO DINE 




ICE CREAJ% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 

PIN NER ^ 





w^^lM 


Caroline Jones 
Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 


1 


Is, M YF* 

«n4 


and tea from 3 to 5 
334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



tteanorS 



445 Powell St., 

San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchant's lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p, m. (a la cartel. Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 76 to 100 people 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



BLANC O'S 



O'l nnHl .....I I, hi kin Street! Phone PrankUn » 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 
in the finest cafe in America 

1'tiiif limn < 1 1 ::tn to 2 i>. m.) - 7B C 

Dinner, Week Da > > --_..._ pi. BO 

"inner, Suiulnvs nnd Holidays - $1.7.1 






L: 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



na 'I'hinl Avenue. S \\ ll \tko 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

l 10 s i ' 00 p. m. 

in. to 8:30 p. in 

< i iisi:n i:\ i:im mc>\i> w 
iioii Block Iron DlRhna? 




Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

lin\ ftiQfl V. M TO II 111 P, M. 

I NS1 RPASSED i 1 ISINI 

CAM Li oMi \rtnr 

(or.. 

Goldoo C I'.tk Casino 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that n vigorous h rushing once or twice a day la 
taking very good care of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. 3lany things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They mny not be as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth nnd gums. 
There are gum troubles ttvn* will destroy teeth faster than 
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DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garflcld 335 

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The 



Diamond Jubilee 

Edition 

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San Francisco 
News Letter 

will be published 

September 5, 1925 

112 PAGES 

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the Story of California. It Will Be Illustrated 
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Including: a Period From 1837 to VJ2r. 



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during the last four years.) 




EfUMIahad July SO, ISM 

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TER 




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The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

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Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 8, 1925 



No. 6 



THOUGHTS ON THE JUBILEE 



The Diamond Jubilee approaches, so the mind goes back 
to that period destroyed by our advent with a civilization 
differing in almost every respect from that which we sup- 
planted. 

It must not be forgotten however that we did supplant a 
civilization. Sometimes we forget that. We pat ourselves 
upon the back and talk as if we had brought light into dark- 
ness, as if we had substituted something very fine for what 
was brutal and ignorant. 

We pay too little attention to the actualities of the early 
civilization of California, we do not remember that in this 
state there was a social group, which ranked high in culture 
and whose morals were almost above reproach for in the 
whole history of the occupation by the early settlers, there 
are none of those social offenses which tend to the break up 
of families and which play far too important a part in the 
life of today. 

Even as an economic accomplishment, the deeds of the 
fathers and the Spanish settlers are worth noting. Out of the 
wilderness they raised their farms and by the sale of hides 
in the world market brought into the territory objects of 
art and luxury from Paris and London. The Franciscans 
showed a fine business sense and were adepts at the training 
of the Indian, so that at the time of the secularization of the 
monasteries they had as many as thirty thousand Indians 
working for them. They had planted vineyards and olives : 
the)- had sown crops, their trade in hides was extensive. 
bringing in, it is said, as much as a million dollars in the 
year" before the monastery doors closed. And, a million 
dollars was a great deal of money in 1840. 
. Nobod) could handle the Indians like the Franciscan 
fathers. When they were driven away, the Indians died. 
The early settlers succeeded with the Indian, where we have 
failed. That much is to their credit. 

The life of the settlers was what we would call a lazy 
life, that is to say it was much given to amusement and to 
the cultivation of physical graces, and the enjoyment of liv- 
ing as an art in itself. It was very beautiful, very dignified, 
and, one cannot help thinking, very sweet, lighted with a 
human love to which we have become rather strangers. It 
was a flash of genius which caused ( lertrude Atherton to 
speak of "The Splendid. Idle Forties." Sometimes even to- 
day one catches glimpses of it in accidental ways. 

Nol very far from Monterey, the other day. the writer 
left the highway and went into the woods. Into the woods 
where the Spanish moss droops from the old trees and the 
world rolls back seventy-five years as though they were 
nothing \nd they are nothing to these woods. A jubilee 
is hardly an hour to them 

Monterey, the old Spanish capital is now a rich and mod- 
ern town. ' It is lovely as few places are lovely, with sea 
and sky, wood and mountain, ami a touch of the old days 
still lying like a benediction upon it. 



Well, the writer left the highway, went into the woods 
and there composed himself to watch the flickers at work in 
the trees and to listen to the calling quail. 

To him, thus lying, came along the bridle path through 
the trees an old Mexican on a fine brown horse. 

"So you are alive!" was the salutation. "I heard a rifle 
shot a few minutes ago, and seeing you lying there, I won- 
dered. Two weeks ago I found a man shot in the other 
canyon." 

He sat on his horse, bronzed and grey, a remnant of those 
whom we conquered, a pathetic remnant and lovely with- 
al, he and his brown horse ; both rather obsolete. 

I laughed, handed him a cigarette and with the uncon- 
querable insolence of the Anglo Saxon began asking ques- 
tions. 

"How old are you?" "Just seventy," he said, "I was 
l>orn in 1855, and have never been out of the county." 

That was interesting. The tide of conquering Nordics 
had not overwhelmed that part of the country in 1855. 
Here was some one who had memories at least. So I 
started asking: 

"The mission was destroyed then, was it not?" "Yes, 
it was all ruins." 

"And Monterey was a little town?" "Yes, it was a little 
town, just a few adobes. It was nice. We had fine times. 
<lancing and all sorts of fun." 

"And so you have lived up here in the Carmel Valley all 
your life?" 

"Yes, I was vaquero, now I look after this property for 
.! sporting club, San Francisco men. They have six thous- 
and acres here." 

I had come to the point. "Which do you like best, the 
old times or the new?" I asked him. 

"I like the old better. We were all together then. We 
were like a family. We gave everything away. If you 
killed a steer you had no beef in three days because you 
gave it to your neighbors. But then your neighbors gave 
you beef too. 

"If you came along through the valley here and were 
hungry, you could kill a calf to eat. Nobody would in- 
terfere. If you put the hide on the branch of a tree so that 
the owner could see it when he rode through, it was all 
right. We did not let anybody go hungry. If you came 
to a house you could sleep. Nobody ever turned away a 
man who wanted rest for the night. 

"I see the big automobiles, ami I see the tramps. We 
did not have automobiles and we did not have tramps. I 
don't know much. I have not seen much. I like the old 
days best." 

1 )f course, he did. Most men of seventy would like their 
old days best. On the other hand we are equally confi- 
dent that we have put some thing very great upon the 
earth, in this our civilization. We do not question it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 




The tying up of the city within 
Remove the Blockade the narrow boundaries which 

the exigencies of the topograph- 
ical siUation have imposed upon us is one of the most 
pressing questions of the day. It is preeminately, after 
all. the most important, for with the present congestion, 
it is quite impossible to get the growth, which is ours by 
right and which awaits the removal of the barriers. 

The peninsula highroad is by all odds the first and most 
urgent matter. The one road leading from the city to the 
south is too congested for our needs. There does not seem 
to be any way of aiding the public with respect to that. Of 
course it should be widened as far as possible, but there 
does not seem to be much chance for successful widening 
of enough of the road to greatly mitigate the situation. We 
had looked forward to the making of a new coast highway 
which would materially improve the situation by divert- 
ing a large portion of the traffic. Not only that, but the 
new road would have scenic features that would be no small 
asset to the city. However, we seem to have been, at least 
partially, disappointed in this matter. Delay is warranted 
neither by the exigencies of the situation nor the promises 
which have been so lavishly made. 

There is no doubt that pressure should be at once brought 
to bear upon those responsible to hurry up the construction 
of the road. 

The other activity which is urgently demanded is rapid 
construction of the bridge across the Golden Gate. This 
has already had much propaganda and is readily under- 
stood. It is a very essential factor in the growth of the city 
and w r ill mark the creation of rich and populous suburbs 
in Marin County. 

The blockade must be ended as early as possible and the 
city freed to grow. 



It is a pretty state of affairs 
Motoring Extraordinary when there are convictions, 

under any law. amounting to 
the almost unbelievable number of 37.721. in the course of 
six months. Such, in fact, is the actual number of those 
convicted under the motor vehicle act. People, who are 
able to afford a machine and who undertake to drive, should 
be at least sufficiently mature in mind to avoid, in ordinary 
cases, the penalty of the law. Here we have a number of 
convictions which gives us a very poor idea of the intellect 
of our fellow citizens. 

Speeding was responsible for 25.102 convictions; while 
5,885 had to pay for reckless driving. Of course, some- 
times speeding is quite accidental and almost unavoidable; 
but such is not often the case. Except, perhaps, in some 
remote country districts, the speed-cops, are very reason- 
able and usually, except in outrageous cases, are content 
-.vith a warning where, there is reason to believe that mere 
inadvertence is the cause of speed. Such speeding, as is 
fined, is, in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred, reckiess and 
inexcusable speeding. 

There are 3029 more convictions for the first half of this 
year than were for the same period last year. Either this 
is due to greater negligence or to increased vigilance on 
the part of the officers. The report of the chief of division 
of motor vehicles attributes it to the latter, but officials 
are prone to praise their system. 

Even these reports are not complete and Mr. Marsh, 



chief of the division, thinks that several more thousands 
would have to be added to give the whole number. Some 
of the courts do not comply with the law in making returns. 
Just as we learned something about the mentality of the 
average from the reports of the military examiners in the 
war. so we are learning more from the relation of the av- 
erage citizen to his automobile. 



Last week we called attention to the 
Public Defender. report of the Probation Officer and 
showed the creation of that particular 
official and the method of probation already working as 
effecting great good to this community and a first class 
social investment. This week we have to say the same 
about another new institution, that of public defender. 

It is within quite recent times that the community de- 
cided that manv people charged with crime did not have 
the chance to defend themselves, because of poverty. The 
usual way was for the court to appoint a lawyer to defend. 
As there was no fee to be earned, it was quite in accordance 
with human nature that the cases should not be effectively 
defended. Indeed, the appointed attorney usually caused 
his client to plead guilty and everybody was pleased, except 
the poor, innocent victim. 

The public defender is for just such cases. He has pub- 
lished his report, from which it appears that out of 112 
cases tried in the Superior Court he obtained 52 verdicts 
of "not guilty," which means that 52 innocent people were 
practically saved from conviction. There can be little doubt 
of their innocence, for the public defender would not de- 
fend where he was not sure of innocence, as it would be no 
object to him. He gets no fees; only salary. 

There were 89 cases dismissed by the Superior Court, 
after hearing, on motion of the public defender as to im- 
probability of conviction, or for jurisdictional reasons; by 
this the city and county was saved the expense of trials. 

More even than these material gains is the imponderable 
one. that proceeds from the certainty that mere poverty 
will not in itself condemn a person to suffer unjust convic- 
tion and punishment. We congratulate ourselves upon the 
public defender, Mr. Frank J. Egan, and we extend him 
our good wishes. 



We have on several occasions 
Rubber Restriction called attention to the fact that 

the British control of rubber is 
likely to have an adverse effect upon the business of this 
country. It must be remembered that we are the great 
consumers of rubber. Our proportion of consumption is at 
least seventy five per cent of the total consumption in the 
world, probably greater. The British own the sources of 
supply and by a recent scheme of restriction of output of 
raw rubber have greatly raised prices. 

There is no complaint about the fact that the British 
control the rubber production. They have fairly earned it, 
for they showed foresight and sagacity in anticipating the 
demand, and they risked their money very gamely on the 
chances of the market. They also have had their periods 
of hard times and for years returns on rubber were very 
negligible. Now, conditions have changed. They have 
taken hold of the production scientifically and, by limiting 
the output into the market, have raised prices. 

It may be that this will be bad for us. It certainly will 
be bad ; unless there is a change somewhere for, with the 
enormous demand of the motor industry for rubber, there 
will be much dislocation unless prices can be kept within 
the limits which allow the ordinary person to maintain an 
automobile. 

The interesting fact is that this is only the first evidence 
of the change which is coming. There will be an ever in- 
creasing demand for raw materials. Rubber, oil and the 



August 8, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



5 



like, which are general necessities will be the objects for 
which nations will strive. In this fact lies the subject of fu- 
ture wars and international rivalries. In the meantime we 
should as far as possible remedy our lack by the growth of rub- 
ber in our own possessions. If we have no possessions that 
can grow rubber effectively we may have to fight for some. 



We have so many laws. Even 
An Avalanche of Laws this year we have on the stat- 
ute book four hundred and sev- 
enty-eight new measures, which are supposed, by the most 
idiotic of all legal fictions to be known to the citizens. And 
yet it might have been worse, for we have a governor who 
has a healthy dislike of new laws and who has put the 
stopper on a great deal of legislative effervescence. 

The laws are a sort of quilt, for they cover everything 
as one commentator puts it "from caps on milk bottles to 
aeroplanes and every profession, from millionaire to hod 
carrier." And what do you think they cost? Were they 
mere windy inexpensive testimonials to the egotism of the 
legislators? We should say not; each of these legislative 
enactments, which, like the ten virgins, are, some of them, 
wise and, some of them, foolish; each of them, wise and 
foolish alike, cost the sum of $520. And you may rest as- 
sured, dear reader, that they are- not worth the money. It 
would be hardly too much to say that the whole lot is not 
worth the price of one. 

This whole legislative business is one of the most tire- 
some and useless phenomena of modern times. And yet 
there does not seem any way in which it can be remedied. 
To get a number of legislators together is to assemble the 
most windy and meretricious group of human beings. Each 
of them has gained his place as an assemblyman or senator, 
by canoodling the mob and by flatteries and obsequiousness, 
which, in any other business, would not fail to ruin him 
utterly in the estimation of decent-thinking men. These 
legislators swarm into Sacramento with sacks full of pro- 
posed laws in the interest of this man and of that, of this 
trade and of that, besides a mass of sickly and sentimental, 
twaddly notions. 

This new lot of laws is bad enough ; we are grateful to 
the governor however that it is no worse. 



There is to be a bill intro- 
An Important Departure duced in Congress at the next 

session, which is of very great 
importance and which marks a very distinct growth in na- 
tional organization. It is sponsored both by the Chamber 
of Commerce of the United States and the American Fair 
Trade League. It will be seen therefore that the proposed 
legislation meets the wishes of the best informed business 
minds of the country. 

The purpose of the measure is to legalize the standard- 
ization of resale prices throughout the country. The joint 
committee promises a copy of the draft of the bill 
within the next few weeks and we shall then be able to get 
at the machinery by which this standardization of prices is 
arranged. 

The very idea of the standardisation of prices was ab- 
horrent to the American mind only a quarter of a century 
ago. The economic needs of the community were supposed 
to be met by a competitive struggle among the various 
agencies which undertook the manufacture and distribution 
Of commodities for the public. It was the notion that such 
a competition was best for the public and that the prices 
which came out of this competition were the prices which 
the public could pay. in the certainty, that the commodity 
was thus presented to them at the lowest rate, since compe- 
tition between sellers fixed those prices. 

Much has been learned since then, among other things, 
that competition docs not secure the lowest rates; that it 
tends to debase the standards of commodities; that it im- 



poses a heavy tax on industry which the ultimate consumer 
has to pay. The needs of the community are not now sup- 
plied by competing producers and distributors. In many 
cases producers and distributors are identical and very fre- 
quently have a practical monopoly of the commodity. 

Since production and distribution are standardized it 
therefore becomes logically imperative to standardize prices. 

Diamond Jubilee 

The Japanese cruiser "Tama" has been assigned to San 
Francisco harbor for California's Diamond Jubilee, leaving 
Japan August 10 for this port. Every day sees new addi- 
tional foreign nations falling into line to celebrate our 
seventy-fifth year of Statehood. England, Belgium, Ger- 
many, Mexico, France and Italy have already accepted in- 
vitations to participate and will have official representa- 
tion. 

Plans for a sensational race between a speed boat. and a 
railroad train from Los Angeles to San Francisco are be- 
ing perfected now, and marine sportsmen and speed boat 
enthusiasts the country over are all enthusiasm over it. 

Preparations are continuing for the "Jubilee Cruise" of 
the motion picture industry in which several hundred noted 
stars and directors will make a special trip to San Fran- 
cisco on the H. F. Alexander during Jubilee week. 

Among others who will attend are Joseph M. Schenck, 
Jesse L. Lasky, Cecil B. DeMille, who is entering his 
yacht in the speed boat race, and many others. 



National Egg Day 

The Poultry Industry of California is now nationally 
recognized. At a conference held last year in Chicago, the 
National Poultry Council adopted a resolution setting aside 
a day in August as "NATIONAL EGG DAY"— an annual 
event. 

Petaluma — "The World's Egg Basket" — has sent the 
message to all parts of the world that Wednesday, August 
12, 1925. has been designated as "EGG DAY." 

A program of "FRFE EVENTS" — contests that will in- 
terest young and old, with an abundance of exceptional 
prizes — a grand ball in the evening, at which event Peta- 
luma's Egg Day Queen will reign with grace and dignity. 

San Francisco is vitally interested in the poultry industry 
of California as enormous quantities of the feed and grain 
that are supplied to the dealers throughout the state are 
daily sold by San Francisco brokers and milling concerns 
for shipment to the egg-producing centers. 



Reminder to Nations to Pay Debts 

Secretary of the Treasury Mellon and other members 
of the American Debt Commission will meet at the Treas- 
ury Department tomorrow to determine what further ac- 
tion shall be taken to collect the unfunded obligations 
of more than §7,000,000,000 owed the United States by va- 
rious European nations. 

The commission will canvass developments since April, 
when the United States undertook to "remind" the re- 
calcitrant debtor nations that they were expected to enter 
into negotiations for settlement. 

Arrival in Xew York of the Belgian Debt Commission, 
headed by former Premier Theunis. places the $481,000,000 
obligation of the Brussels government in the foreground. 

Next in immediate interest is the French debt of $4,211,- 
000,000, which is to be taken up next month by a debt 
commission from Paris, possibly with Finance Minister 
Caillaux as its chief. 

Despite numerous responses and declarations of inten- 
tion to pay. the situation remains as it was when Con- 
gress adjourned in March, at which time Great Britain, 
Finland. Hungary, Poland and Lithuania were the only 
nations to have funded their obligations. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 




>LE/ISURE'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

_ Tom Moore- 




Alcazar 

«-]%/!- ERTON OF THE MOVIES," 

1Y1 that pathetic little story of Holly- 
wood by Harry Leon Wilson, opened at 
the Alcazar last Sunday evening, and 
it was another great personal triumph 
for Henry Duffy, from start to finish. 

Duffy brought to the part of Merton 
a pathos indescribable. — his comedy is 
of the sort that brings the laughter that 
is "akin to tears," — his acting in the 
scene where he is so sadly disillusioned 
in his idol, Beulah Baxter, the movie 
queen is superb ; it is by far the best 
thing that Duffy has done here. 

And Dale Winter as the extra girl 
who feels sorry for the poor green kid 
from the small town, and tries to save 
him some bumps, gives a brilliant per- 
formance. The scenes between her and 
Duffy were delightful. 

Walter Regan as the temperamental 
director was great. Any one who has 
been "on the lot"' would appreciate it 
to the fullest extent. James Donlan 
as Jeff Baird, Flo Irwin as the casting 
director. Ray L. Royce as Gashweiler, 
Hal Davis as the tragedian, Dorothy 
La Mar as Beulah Baxter, Charles 
Gregg as Rosenblatt, Walter White as 
assistant director, and all the other 
members of the large cast did splendid 
work. 

The production is well staged, and 
the atmosphere of a movie studio is 
faithfully reproduced. If anything, it 
is a much better production than the 
road show recently seen here. 
President 

"The Best People" is still the magnet 
for amusement loving San Franciscans 
where it starts on its ninth week, be- 
ginning tomorrow. Much of the suc- 
cess of this piece must be attributed to 
Stage Director Edwin Curtis. Brought 
here from New York, his efforts have 
resulted in one of the most interesting 
productions in the history of the the- 
ater in the West. 

Marion Lord, the "gold-digging" 
girl interprets the amusing role as 
though it had been written for her. 
The same thing is true of Norman 
Hackett as the aristocratic father. In- 
deed this same thing is true of every 
member of the capable cast gathered 
together to produce this play. 



By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 

"Don Q, Son of Zorro," opened yester- 
day at the Imperial. In this picture. 
Fairbanks reverts to the type of pic- 
ture in which he made his greatest hit. 
It is a sequel to the story told in "The 
Mark of Zorro," which was high water 
mark for Doug. In the cast with him 
are Stella De Lanti, Mary Astor, Don- 
ald Crisp and other sterling players. 



Curran 

"No, No, Nanette," continues to 
draw large crowds at the Curran The- 
ater. This popular play, which has 
captured the fancy of San Francisco 
opens on its sixth week Monday. 

An interesting thing happened the 
other day when "Mother" Mandel came 
in to town to see her son's play, — she 
naively confided to a few of us that she 
was responsible for much of the dia- 
logue! "Father" Mandel hasn't seen 
the show as yet, but hopes to before 
the end of its present run. 

Taylor Holmes, Nancy Welford, 
Angie Norton, Willard Hall and many 
others, including a particularly good 
looking chorus, beautifully costumed, 
will insure against your have a dull 
moment, if you are lucky enough to se- 
cure seats for this play. 



Imperial 
Douglas Fairbanks' new picture, 



Loew's Warfield 

This theater may well be proud of 
the program selected and arranged for 
the opening of Greater Movie Season 
in San Francisco. 

The feature on the screen will be 
"Fine Clothes." the screen version of 
Molnar's "Fashions for Men." John 
Stahl directed the picture and the leads 
are Lewis Stone, Raymond Griffith, 
Alma Rubens and Percy Marmont. 

The feature on the stage this week 
is the return of Waring's Pennsylvan- 
ians in one of Fanchon & Marco's 
"Ideas." 

The management of this popular the- 
ater are asking their audiences to ex- 
press their opinion as to whether Lip- 
schultz, the dignified Music Master at 
this theater has sacrificed anything in 
adding to the Music Masters musicians 
who are capable of playing symphony 
as well as jazz. 

Another feature of the splendid pro- 
gram is the engagement of Mildred 
Melrose, premiere danseuse, who gave 
up a tour to Europe to play an engage- 
ment at the West Coast houses. 



Capitol 

"Lightnin"' the very human, plain, 
every-day play now running at the 
Capitol Theater is alive with dramatic 
situations from the prologue right 
through, but the dramatic climax of 
the play comes in the famous court 
room scene, when Bill Jones carries on 
a cross-examination of a surely recal- 
citrant witness. Thomas lefferson. 
who plays the title role gets out of this 
scene much laughter, — but the laughter 
that is close to tears, for after his fa- 
mous "summing up" he bows his head 
and his arms hang limp against his 
G A. R. uniform, pity grips the throat 
of his audience and always there is a 
mighty roar of applause when 'mother' 
(Mrs. Frank Bacon) steps forward and 
begs his forgiveness. 

There are eleven members of the 
original company playing in the com- 
pany at present at the Capitol, and 
Bessie Bacon carries off the palm when 
she goes on the stand and carries on 
her flirtation with the judge, and re- 
sponds to the question as to when her 
husband first showed signs of not lov- 
ing her, by answering. "About a year 
before we were married." 



Orpheum 

Abe Lyman and his California Or- 
chestra head the big bill at this theater 
this week, coming here direct from a 
two years' engagement at the Am- 
bassador Hotel in Los Angeles. 

Franklyn D'Amore a newcomer to 
the ranks of vaudeville, offers a sur- 
prise, assisted by Mickey Lopell and 
label Truesdale. Jack Rube Clifford 
brings a brand new act. "Thank You, 
Doctor" is the name of a comedy turn 
with Eleanor Micks and Chester Chile. 
Moran & Wiser will be seen in "All in 
Fun"; the Georgalis Trio. European 
marksmen de luxe do some difficulty 
stunts with Remington rilllcs. Jimmy 
Savo and his clever assistant, loan 
Franza, remain over for a second week. 



Granada 

The offering at this theater for 
Greater Movie Week is Herbert 
Brenon's picture. "The Street of For- 
gotten Men" based on a story by 
George Kibbe Turner. The east in- 
cludes Mary Brian, Percy Marmont, 
Neil Hamilton. John Harrington. Riley 
Hatch, Dorothy Walters and others. 



August 8, 1925 

Amusements 



NEXT WEEK 



ALEXANDRIA \ pictupes 
Geary and 18th j 


ALCAZAR \ Henry Duffy Players, 
O'Pnrrell nr. Powell f "Merton of the Movies" 


CALIFORNIA \ „ Not So Long Ag0 „ 

lilt nnri Market j 


- AMC _ ] "Head Winds" 
CAIV,to > House Peters and 
036 Market St. J Ruth Clifford 


». AP ^ T ,° L ,^„ ) "Lightnin"' 

Market anil Ellis f " 


CASINO J 

Mason and Ellis \ Pictures 


CASTRO | 

420 Castro St. ] Pictures 


COLISEUM | 

(lenient and Oth \ Pictures 


COLUMBIA | Frank Keenan 
Eiiiiy and Mason \ "Smiling Danger" 


CURRAN | 

Geary nr. Mason f " No > No . Nanette" 


EGYPTIAN ( Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE ) 

„ „ . in.!? Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor ( 


GRANADA } "The Street of For- 
louii Market St. J gotten Men" 


HAIGHT 1 

IIai K htatCole S Picture s 


IMPERIAL | Douglas Fairbanks 
1077 Market St. J "Don Q, Son of Zorro" 


LOEWS WARFfELD } 

088 Market St. f " Fme Clothes" 


MAJESTIC | 

Mission between , Pictures 
20th and 21st J 


METROPOLITAN } 

2055 Union St. J Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1820 Fillmore 

NEW MISSION 

2.-.-II Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM 

O'Fnrrell and Powell 


1 

s 


Vaudeville 


POMPEII 1 
\r\i door to Grnnndal 


Pictures 


PANTAGES 

llnrkt't ;i I Mnsim 




Vaudeville 


PORTOLA 

770 Market 




Pictures 


PRESIDENT 

Mnrkil A Mr MIKIrr 




"The Best People" 


ROYAL 
ISM l'olk s«. 




Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS 
our. Market 


1 


D. W. Griffith's 
Sally of the Sawdust" 


SUTTER 

Snilrr and stelner 




Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 
(VFarrell nr. Porrrll 




Pictures 4 Revue 


WILKES 

lieary and Mnsoa 




Lenore Ulric 
"Kiki." 


WIGWAM 

Mission nnd --<■ 




Pictures 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Golden Gate 

Beginning tomorrow, the headliner 
at the Golden Gate will be Charles 
Ruggles and his company of six in a 
funny one-act play called "Wives, 
Etc." Wood & Van are also on the 
bill in a comedy offering, "Off Key" ; 
"( Iklahoma" Bob Albright in a charac- 
teristic song cycle in which he is as- 
sisted by Jean King and at the piano 
is a little San Francisco girl, Edna 
Fisher, who has been "stopping the 
show" wherever this act has been 
billed; Pearl Hickman's Kiddie Revue; 
Fred Bernard and Sid Garry, South- 
ern Syncopators, and Bert and his fair 
partner in a unique entertainment. 

The screen feature is Earl Hudson's 
epic of American life "Sundown" with 
an all-star cast, including Bessie Love, 
Hobart Bosworth, Roy Stewart and 
Charlie Murray. Claude Sweeten and 
his orchestra complete the entertain- 
ment. ■ 

Columbia 

"Smiling Danger" Frank Keenan's 
newest vehicle opens at the Columbia 
Monday evening. As George Drag- 
lund, a New York attorney, Keenan 
will add another portrait to his gallery 
of stage characters. This thrilling 
drama was written by Oliver White. 
Bertha Mann, who was leading lady 
for John and Lionel Barrymore plays 
opposite Keenan. 

California 

The attraction for this theater is a 
Paramount production entitled "Not 
So Long Ago" with Ricardo Cortez 
and Betty Bronson. Cortez is seen as 
a gallant gentleman of little old New 

York in the days of 1S50 and Miss 
Bronson appears as his mother's seam- 
stress, ■ 

St. Francis 

Contractors and decorators have 
been tearing around like mad all week, 
trying to get this theater, formerly the 
Strand, opened on time today. 

1). \Y. Griffith's newest picture, 
"Sally of the Sawdust," will have it^ 
hr-t showing here coincident with the 
opening of the new house and the be- 
ginning of Greater Mpvie Week. 

Carol Dempster. W. C. Field- and 
Alfred Lunt are the principal players. 
This story was adapted from the story 
which ran in the Saturday Evening 
Po>t awhile ago. Griffith issued orders 
to the effect that none of the newspaper 
fraternity should preview this picture. 
beliex ing, as always, that it is best for 
the critics to see the picture under the 
best of conditions, with an orches- 
tra, etc ■ 

Pantages 

"Plantation Days" all-colored, one- 
hour revue returns to this house this 
week. The Five Crackerjacks will also 
return with a new show containing the 
latest jazz numbers. 

(Continued on Page 161 




ADVANTAGES 



OVERLOOKING BELMONT 
YACHT HARBOR AND 
LINCOLN PARK GOLF 
COURSES • • • 
ANEWHOTEL-700 ROOMS 
OPENED EARLY IN 1924 
ALREADY FAMOUS FOR 
ITS HOSPITABLE 
ATMOSPHERE • • • 

•J. «J. <$» 

SUMMER RATES 
WRITE FOR BOOKLET 

G.L\Billin<jslet) 




Pacific 

SANGERFEST 
Civic Auditorium 

CHORUS OF 800 VOICES 
Greatest Ever Assembled Here 

ORCHESTRA OF 65 
Frederick G. Schiller, Director 

SATURDAY EVE., AUG. 15 

JULIA CLAUSSEN 

Prima Donna Soprano 

ARNOLD GABOR 

Baritone 

of the Metropolitan Opera 

SUNDAY EVE., AUG. 16 

Arnold Gabor Gertrude Weidemann 

Stella Raymond Vought 

Tickets — $2. $1 I no taxi, at Sherman 
& Clay Co., Kohler & Chase and San- 
gerfest Office, California Hall. 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the Edge of the Berkeley Hllla 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set In a beautiful twenty -eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Oh, To Be a Man! 

MEN have a visit in Paradise! 
1 1 you don't believe it, take a trip sometime up to 
the Bohemian Grove, where the Russian River flows. For- 
tunate indeed are you, if you belong to the Bohemian Club, 
for yours, then, is the privilige of sojourning there. 

But, you must be a man, my friends, or you cannot enter 
its >acred domain. That glorious place with its matchless 
boundary lines, its towering trees, its singing streams, is 
a forest sanctuary exclusively and absolutely for men. 

Just once, and only once, were feminine footsteps al- 
lowed to tread the leaf-tossed way. Just once, and never 
since, were sisters, sweethearts and wives permitted a 
glimpse of that Paradise. 

How we treasure that once. That is why we feel so 
justified in associating the grove with heavenly spheres. 
It is a most resplendent realm. Nature, herself, enshrined 
it with peerless glory. Then, true Bohemians supple- 
mented their share. 

The hilltops, the shrubbery, the majestic growths, the 
running riplets and rivers, the rare and radiant blossom- 
ings! But, even they are not all. For. world-renowned 
artists, sculptors, scientific men and artisans combined 
their super-skill with the handicraft of Nature and created 
a place, sublime ! 

Then, followed the invitation to — Paradise! 

Men. high in the world's affairs, financiers, builders of 
empires, as well as they famed in the lore of literature, 
music and art. began their pilgrimage to Bohemian Grove. 
They come, now, from across the continent, from lands be- 
yond the seas ; they travel by ship, by rail, by motor, by 
routes of air, hastening their way to participate, each year, 
in a significant burning of Care and the exultation of Man. 

Bohemian Grove — they call the transcendent place. But, 
we, mere women-folks, believe it must be a vestibule of 
Paradise. 

* * * 

Bohemian Play 

"Wings," written by Joseph S. Thompson, for the 
twenty-fourth annual Bohemian Grove "Jinks" is enthusi- 
astically acclaimed by those who know, as one of the great- 
est literary triumphs of western creative work, in the reck- 
onings of the long line of excellent plays. 

Built upon an allegorical theme in which insects and tiny 
creatures of the forest appear in characterizations of human 
beings, the author introduces a dramaturgy in which his 
magnifying glass reveals innermost principles and precepts 
of life.' 

The play gives supremacy to the little living things of 
the forest and presents them pursuing their ambitions, their 
aspirations; seeking their rightful place and ultimate hap- 
piness. Human foibles and frailities as well as the finer 
qualities are portrayed with skill by the players who in- 
terpret the memorable masterpiece. 

According to universal opinion. "Wings," will long be 
rated as a powerful production over which swayed the 



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650 RuMh Street. Between Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3660 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



glamour of color and fantasy and ethereal charm. Con- 
sidered as a permanent contribution to literature, "Wings" 
has taken its place, a- most enviable place, in dramatic 
achievement and the author is held in still higher esteem 
by makers of drama as well as they who value literature. 

Music for the Bohemian Grove play, this year, was com- 
posed by the late George Edwards. Charles Hart, com- 
poser and director of the Bohemian Little Symphony Or- 
chestra led the musicians in interpretations of the dramatic 
moods. His masterly direction contributed largely to the 
success of the Bohemian Grove play. Reginald Travers, 
director of stage productions, was again responsible for the 
flawless stage work and the intricate innovations. 

Easton Kent played the role of the leading lady ; and 
for those who do not know the rules of Bohemian Grove 
plays, this information we impart ; All characters, both 
male and feminine parts, are portrayed by men. It seems 
almost unbelievable. But it is so, for we who were their 
guests, once, saw and heard for ourselves and were over- 
whelmingly convinced. 

The stage on which the play is enacted is so exquisitely 
framed by trees, and commanding mountainsides, that a 
grasp of immensity is primarily instilled. At times, dur- 
ing the progress of the play, especially in "Wings," so we 
have been told, the forested hills seemed alive with rhyth- 
mic movement. Solo and ensemble participants essay their 
respective parts upon the mammoth stage. Entrances upon 
the stage are made from the stairways carved into the soil, 
wending their way down onto the very edge of the histri- 
onic boards. In "Wings," many of the characters actually 
flew from the trees, or from the shrubbery, fulfilling the 
trend of the theme and its purport. 

The curtain ! Of course, I don't know just exactly what 
kind of a curtain they had this year. But, I shall always 
remember the one I saw. It was constructed of trees form- 
ing a miniature forest, and when, at a given time, the cur- 
tain parted, it registered the impression of a forest actually 
alive moving onward — somewhere. Then, when signalled 
for the close of the act, it united again forming each time, 
the imposing scene of animated sky-reaching redwoods. 

* * * 
Brief Sketch 

A brief sketch of the play follows, although we wish 
space permitted more — 

The principal feminine character in the play is known as 
Cissindelle. She is a beetle and very beautiful to look upon 
but her wings are encased beneath a crust which seemed in- 
evitable until she becomes aware of the fact that she too 
can fly like the beautiful creatures' she admires. This is 
the precept of the drama for on the ability to rise to heights 
sublime has the author fashioned his theme, and the right 
to aspire to lofty things is the principle on which his drama 
is built. 

The script introduces the appearance of sunflies who urge 
the beetle to test her wings. But spiders designing against 
her welfare belittle her skill and weave their machinations 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL, S. STANLEY 



August 8, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



to destroy her hopes. Romance runs through 
the allegory and in the end the magic influ- 
ence of love and the selfless devotion of the 
king of the sunflies supply the power for flight 
toward the realm of happiness. 

Ballet introductions in this play were so 
startlingly beautiful and so unusual in their 
presentation that even old-time Bohemians de- 
clare themselves amazed and mystified with it 
all. 

Cast of Celebrities 

Celebrities from the world of creative art 
were among the principals in the cast of play- 
ers. 

Easton Kent, the heroine of the play, was 
the beetle. William S. Rainey was the spright- 
ly leader of the sunflies. Benjamin Purring- 
ton essayed the part of leader of the earth bugs 
and Cameron Prudhomme was one of his 
crafty cohorts. Boyd Oliver and Frederick 
McNulty headed the line of beetles. 

Richard Hotaling, in his role of a designing 
spider, Lycisa ; and Charles G. Norris, noted 
California novelist, another spider, were characters of un- 
usual bearing and convincing strength. 

President William M. Abbott of the Bohemian Club is 
being roundly congratulated upon the remarkable success 
of this year's "High Jinks ;" while Joseph S. Thompson, 
the author of "Wings," is the recipient of high tributes 
from men versed in the values of plays as well as they 
whose high privilege it has been to be of the appreciative 
audience. 

* * * 

Cremation of Care 

( tbservance of the Cremation of Care, an annual cere- 
mony of the drove, was fittingly carried into effect this 
year through the series of "Low Jinks" which preceded the 

Charles K. Field wrote the ritual for the auspicious cere- 
mony with its scholarly innovations as well as its dip 
into the mystic tone of symbolism and unfettered thought. 
Humor proved a successful foil for depressing care and 
held high its torch of directing philosophy, 

Charles G. Norris presided as Sire of the yearly "Low 
Jinks" which is always a pleasing part of the annual Grove 
gathering. George F. Richardson provided a successful 
entertainment for the night preceding the big production 
with members of note contributing clever features and 
notables of the world among spectators. 

* * * 

Distinguished members of the Bohemian Club in attend- 
ance at the Grove plaj included Templeton Crocker. Peter 
B. Kyne, Harry Leon Wilson, George Sterling. Charles 
Caldwell Dobie, Rupert Hughes, lames Swinnerton, F. G. 
Cooper, Harrison Fisher. Spencer Mackay and Haig Pati- 
gian. 

* * * 

Notable Visitors 

Many notable visitors from different parts of the world 
were guests of the Bohemian Club at the annual presenta- 
tion of their ( Irove Play. 

Prominent among- them were Irvin S. Cobb, famous 
writer and humorist: Ex-Governor Goodrich of Indiana; 
William Allen White, famous author and Herbert Bayard 




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Swope, managing editor of the New York 
World. 

Herbert Hoover and Charles K. Field, en- 
tertained the last named three at their jointly 
established camp in Bohemian Grove. 

Charles Norris whose home is in Saratoga 
entertained Irvin S. Cobb at the famous Norris 
country place preceding the Grove play, and 
during the historical annual "Jinks" was host 
to a number of eastern celebrities during their 
stay in the camp de luxe of the western novel- 
ist at Bohemian Grove. 

Famous Families Founders 
Of Bohemian Plays 

Famous families of California were among 
charter members of the Bohemian Club or- 
ganized fifty-three years ago. The early ros- 
ter includes these names : J. Armstrong, David 
P. Belknap, Ambrose Bierce, H. R. Bloomer, 
E. Bosqui, James F. Bowman, J. C. Cremony, 
H. S. Dalliba, Henry Edwards. Sands W. For- 
man, Arpad Haraszthy, D. McCarthy, Frank J. 
Murphy, B. F. Napthaly, Theodore Newman, 
Daniel O'Connell, R. C. Rogers, W. V. Wells, C. A. Wet- 
more, Frederick Whymper and Thomas Newcomb, the last 
named being the first president of the Bohemian Club, who 
officiated in 1872-73. Virgil Williams was president from 
1875-76. 

* * * 

Genius Displayed 

The best genius of the State has been displayed at the 
annual jinks of the Bohemian Club. It is considered a 
great honor among creative minds to have one's original 
work presented in script, in musical composition, or in any 
of the avenues of artistic expression during the historic 
gathering which marks the "Jinks" of the Bohemians. 

* * * 
Secrets Observed 

Additional interest is always centered on all of the grove 
plays for there is always an air of mystery surrounding 
them. This secrecy is scrupulously observed and often only 
they, participating, have any previous knowledge of the 
nature of the play or its contents 

* * * 
Origin of Jinks 

To Sir Walter Scott's novel. "Guy Mannering" is attri- 
buted the origin of "Jinks" an amusement of the Bohemian 
Club for these many years. Referring to Scott's famous 
novel we find Counsellor Playdell presiding over the "High 
Jinks" from whence comes the title used at the gala as- 
semblages of men. 

During the early history of the club the jinks were more 
or less impromptu in their presentation until at a stated 
time more ambitious programs were given in the nature of 
plays. For twenty-four years these plays have now been 
the standard of program presentation, each event marking 
the annual jinks. 

History tells us that the first Bohemian play was written 
by Thomas Newcomb, the initial president, and was en- 
titled. "The Diamond Dividend " It was presented for the 
benefit of Henry Edwards, an actor of considerable note 
playing in a stock company at the California theater. John 
McCullough was one of the players. 

(Continued on Page 15) 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, California 

On Ik* Coait Hi«h»«T HalfwiT Brt>«*a S»n Frueiic* tad I >* Artytlrt 

An Inn »f IbiwdiI Esc*ll«ac*. 

WW* *r MTU* far r««r«B«l Ml 7-W «««* trxp MlA. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN, Agua Caliente. Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 



«&££<&» 



-s^sys* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



•eWPJS* 



'JtP 




he l)uet*enl>t*rp- It* Popular at llie Country Club 




a: 



CCORDING to Norman W. Farlow, chair- 
Liiian, the golf tournament held under the 
auspices of the California Sanitation Develop- 
ment League at Portland, Oregon, during the 
convention of the National Association of 
Master Plumbers, was the most successful that 
has ever been held in the plumbing trade. 

The weather dawned as perfect as it is pos- 
sible to have it, and it was quite evident that 
the Portlanders had it delivered specially for the occasion. 
The arrangements could not have been more perfect, and a 
great deal of praise is due the committee of Portland 
plumbers, headed by Bob Rennie, for the admirable way the 
entire tournament was handled. The city had closed the 
Eastmoreland course for the day so that the tournament 
went on without interruption. 

There were over 300 starters representing every large city 
of the United States. San Francisco and Oakland led the 
field with over 50 entrants, while next in line of numbers 
was Portland. 

Play began at 6:30 a. m., when President John Vogelpohl. 
of the Masters Plumbers took his position on the first tee 
and drove the first ball, for a good 225 yards, straight down 
the fairway. The first foursome then got under way. and 
from that time until 1 :30 p. m. a different foursome left the 
tee each five minutes. 

The tournament brought out a great deal of good natured 
rivalry among the players from the different cities, and the 
playing committee showed forethought in arranging the 
foursomes so that no two players from one place played to- 
gether. 

The Eastmoreland course is a very beautiful one. being 
laid out on an easy rolling country with no steep ascents or 
declines, and this aided most of the players, who were tend- 
ing toward embonpoint, but worked hardships on those who. 
like Frank Klim, of San Francisco, had perfected hand 
mashie shots and the like. The 12th hole proved to he a 
jinx for a large number of the players, as about 30 per cent 
of the cards showed from 9 to 14 strokes on this hole. There 
are also three water hazards on the Eastmoreland course 
that made many of the players wish they had brought along 
their bathing suits. 

In spite of these handicaps 132 players turned in cards 
showing gross scores of 99 or better, and San Francisco 



proved that her representatives could hold their own by hav- 
ing 11 players in this group. 

In the first 50 low net scores San Francisco was repre- 
sented by eight men, viz : Buick 80, Stern 82, Clark 86, 
Lamond 86, Klinim 87, Leary 87, Goss 90, Lacey 90. 

The tournament was won by William J. Woolley, of Evans- 
ville, Indiana with a net 78. Low Gross went to S .D. Cochran, 
of Seattle, Washington, who shot an 89 and "Blind Bogey" 
was won by H. P. Reger, of Chicago, Illinois with gross 98. 

All cards were turned in by 6:00 p. m., and the awarding 
of prizes took place at the Grand Ball, held at the Multno- 
mah Hotel that night. 

"Billy" Goss, the genial San Francisco plumber, played 
the first 9 holes almost perfectly, showing a card of only 
3 above par. but the water hazards proved his undoing on 
the second 9. 

Newt Stern, of the Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Com- 
pany, turned in one of the best cards of his career, and the 
only thing that kept him out of the prize list was the phe- 
nominal playing of the winners. 

Ross M. Clark, of the American Radiator Company, was 
far better on the last 9 than he was on the first. This is 
hard to account for, as the last 9 has lots of water in it. 

Tom Leary, of the Mueller Company, and Frank J. 
Klimm had a wager on their outcome, and ever since they 
both turned in cards of 87, they have been searching for 
a fast moving stake-holder. 

Andy Lamond, of the Wolverine Company, shot his usual 
consistent game. Andy can always be counted on to do his 
stuff. 

Bill Buick, of San Francisco, showed all the boys what 
golf clubs are made for, and came in for third prize. 

Jack Hottes, of Crane Company, and Jackson Noble, of 
Richmond Sanitary Company, Oakland, gave excellent ac- 
counts of themselves, finishing 17th and 18th respectively. 

Ben Blair, the Beau Brummel. wore his red cap and 
sweater and they were so intensely red that the ducks went 
wild. 

Ed Lacey, one of. the San Francisco beginners, spent the 
day crabbing at the handicap committee. 'S funny, that 
seems to be the first thing they learn. 

Volney Howard, of the Chase Company, had only one re- 
gret ; that he had but one ball to give to the lake. 
(Continued on Page 15) 



August 8, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



^&. 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

Acting Mayor, J. Emmet Hayden, Super- 
visor Angelo J. Rossi, General Chairman of 
the Diamond Jubilee and Lewis I. Byington, 
who were responsible for the initial parade 
josei'iiimo an d demonstration for the Diamond Jubilee 
wilson are receiving congratulations for the suc- 
cessful preamble to our great celebration. The parade was 
what we all expected it would be, in color and enthusiasm ; 
but, it transcended our sanguine expectations in point of 
artistic and convincing array. We know what to expect 
when the Jubilee really arrives for the people back of the 
great resplendent event have a deep and substantial knowl- 
edge of California festivities and they are bound to make 
this year's celebration something bigger and better than 
anything else we have known. That of itself is something 
to reckon with ! 

The California Diamond Jubilee parade which took place 
Friday night, July 31, was representative of a splendid co- 
operative plan. The parade started at Sixth and Market 
streets and continued on down Market Street to the Ferry 
Building. People lined up on the sidewalks all along the 
route of the parade were eager participants in its display. 
Red, green and yellow, were used profusely in the decora- 
tive schemes. 

The official escort of police and the municipal band was 
followed by the Nationals, California's first military or- 
ganization, the Native Sons, the Native Daughters, the 
Daughters of California Pioneers, the Knights of Columbus, 
the Catholic Daughters of America, the League of the Cross 
of Cadets with their drum corps and Rowland Still, chief of 
the Arizona Apaches, dressed in the full regalia of his tribe. 
Frank Carroll, the grand marshal of the parade had his 
car decorated witli Jubilee colors and seated on each horn of 
a saddle swung over the radiator were two pretty young 
misses attired in the official costumings. Miss San Fran- 
cisco, Edythe Flynn, rode in a decorated automobile. 

Large American Flag 

A large American flag carried by representative units 
from the American, the French, the British, the Belgian 
and the Italian legions caused the greatest ripple of patri- 
otic enthusiasm as it passed down the crowded thorough- 
fares. 

A dance in the Ferry Building completed the first fes- 
tivity preparatory to the Diamond Jubilee. The most in- 
spiring costume worn in the parade and at the ball was 
accredited !>v the judges to the "Nationals," founded in 

1S55. 

* * * 

Marshall C. Harris was on Friday, July 31. elected 

President of the Western States Life Insurance Company 
to succeed 11. J. Saunders resigned as the result of ill 
health. 

The connection with the company of President-Elect 
Harris dates back to August 9. 1910. when he was elected 
a director. From that time until February 12. l^lS. when 
Harris was elected vice-president of the company, he was 
closely identified with the company's investment activities. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

Mrs. Albert W. Stokes, president of the City and County 
Federation of Women's Clubs, and Mrs. D. E. F. Easton, 
the past-president, were prominent in the parade demon- 
strations held last Friday night. Acting as judges of the 
prize awards for the best and most appropriate costumes 
worn at the Ferry Building ball, both of these well known 
leaders exercised rare judgment and keen discrimination. 

The Novo Club of which Mrs. Milton Unger is the presi- 
dent, will present many interesting dramatic programs dur- 
ing the forthcoming fiscal year, according to plans de- 
fined at a recent meeting. 

Miss Ellie Ewing, dramatic reader, whose leadership 
in the portrayal of Alma Mater during the recent Pageant 
of Youth is still encircling her fame, will give a number of 
interesting plays for the Novo Club. Sessions will open 
with a luncheon the second week in September. 

* * * 

Mrs. D. L. Black, director of the San Francisco Bureau 
of the Republican Women's Federation of California, is 
eager that all women should be well informed as to the 
activities of their party. 

According to Mrs. Black the bureau is attempting to 
overcome political indifference among women and is col- 
lecting accurate information concerning measures 
and aspirants for office. Some of the information which 
the Bureau aims to impart is what measures are introduced 
into Congress, who introduced it, to what committee it 
has been assigned and other important facts. 

Lecture courses on government affairs are also included 
in the activities of the Bureau. Meetings of the organiza- 
tions are often held at the Canterbury Hotel during the 
luncheon hour with distinguished speakers addressing the 
women. * * * 

Mrs. Crawford Honored 

Mrs. James Crawford, prominent in local club affairs, 
and head of the department of literature in the California 
Club and one of the Channing Auxiliary members was 
given a complimentary luncheon last Thursday at the home 
of Mrs. W. A. Hammond in Forest Hill. 

A feature of the delightful day was a recital of songs 
written by Mrs. Crawford's daughter, Dorothy Crawford, 
who is now traveling in Europe in company with Mrs. 

C. C. Moore and her daughter Miss Mary Bernice Moore. 
Anna Young (Mrs. Foster Young) sang the songs with 

the musicianly skill and artistry for which the prima 
donna is famed. Another guest of honor at the tea was 
Mrs. H. R. Casev. wife of Colonel Casey of Washington, 

D. C. 

* * * 

Miss Freda Ground of 1453 Stevenson Street, received 
the first prize for girls offered by the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce for the most signatures to pledges in the 
Chamber of Commerce forest fire prevention campaign. 
Helena Hager of 150 Silliman Street was awarded the sec- 
ond prize. The first prize for boys went to Claude Wagner, 
35 Cornwall street and the second prize was awarded John 
Damozonia. 

A banner will be presented by the Chamber of Commerce 
to the University Community Center to boys and girls 
(Continued on Page 15) 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 




HEADQUARTERS FOR MOTORING SERVICE 

Construction work is Hearing completion on the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association's new general office 
headquarters at Van Ness and Hayes Streets, in San Fran- 
cisco. This six story reinforced concrete headquarters for 
organized motordom will be a distinct addition to the beau- 
tiful civic center district. 

Two years ago, the Association decided upon the policy 
of erecting wherever possible, a standard type of building 
for its district offices. The first one erected was in Fresno, 
and then followed buildings at Eureka, Santa Rosa. San 
Mateo, and Yreka. In addition to these, commodious quar- 
ters were provided in Sacramento. Santa Cruz, Salinas, 
Stockton, Vallejo and Redding. At Modesto, the Associa- 
tion occupies jointly with the Modesto Chamber of Com- 
merce a handsome building erected three vears ago for 
the purpose. 

The architecture of all these buildings is in the Spanish 
Renaissance ; the roofs are in mottled Ramona Spanish tile, 
and add to the distinctive and imposing appearance. The 
exteriors are finished in stucco with columns and ornaments 
in cast cement. 

Commodious offices and plenty of counter space to care 



for expansion are provided on the interior and arranged 
to suit the needs of the Association's business activities. 
Adequate rest rooms are provided for the convenience of 
the motoring public. 

George W. Kellem is the architect who designed the new 
San Francisco headquarters. There are six full stories, 
with basement and mezzanine floor. It has a frontage of 
120 feet on Van Ness Ave., and a depth of 100 ft. on Hayes 
Street. 

The ground floor, with its imposing height of ceiling 
and broad lobby spaces, will be devoted mainly to the 
Touring Bureau and other personal service departments. 
The upper floors will provide spacious, well lighted quar- 
ters for the executive offices, technical and clerical staffs, 
and will be equipped with modern facilities for transacting 
the Association's great and growing volume of work in the 
most efficient manner. 

The new building will likewise serve as San Francisco 
headquarters for each of the thousands of members of the 
Association in Central and Northern California, as well 
as for the visiting members from the Automobile Club of 
Southern California and visiting motor tourists from other 
states. 



August 8, 1925 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

THERE is one feature of the auto- 
mobile that is emphasized too 
much : That is the element of speed. 
Advocates of safe and sane driving were 
startled a few weeks ago to read in 
the public press an article purporting 
to issue from the official headquarters 
of a large organization, which has had 
much to do with safety campaigns in 
the past advocating highways for 
"through tourists" with a speed limit 
of sixty miles an hour. 

Now, sixty miles an hour may be 
our motor speed in some far distant 
future, but to put official approval on 
this rate of travel in the present stage 
of motoring and driving, is to court a 
considerable increase in the accident 
lists and the fatal mishaps recorded 
daily throughout the country. 

There are too many factors which 
enter into the hazard of speed to allow 
a sixty mile rate of travel without ex- 
pecting trouble. There is the human 
equation which is a very dubious foun- 
dation upon which to increase s] 
limits; there are any number of me- 
chanical difficulties which might spell 
disaster and. too, there are a great 
many hazards presented by the road 
surface itself. Sixty miles an hour 
will never be a safe rate of speed on 
any highway in any State until drivers 
are more uniformly vigilant, until cars 
are more carefully inspected and until 
driving surfaces are so perfected as to 
eliminate the possibilities of skidding, 
disintegration under stress and vari- 
ability under changing weather condi- 
tions. 

If you put a sixty-mile limit on a 
highway, be assured" that the drivers 
who might he classed as lame, and halt 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

and blind will avail themselves of this 
opportunity to enjoy the thrill of speed. 

Put a sixty-mile limit on a high- 
way and you will find there many a car 
that belongs in the scrap heap but 
which just keeps on plugging along 
until the grand smash. Set a sixty- 
mile range on the highways and the 
sky will be the limit and the necessary 
accessories will include a harp and a 
pair of wings. 

The State speed law, if adhered to 
at all times, provides a sufficiently 
rapid pace for motor travel and strict 
observance of the speed limits, out- 
lined in the Motor Vehicle Act, will do 
much toward making the highwiays 
and by-ways of California a safer place 
to drive on. The laws were made with 
the safety of the individual motorists 
in mind and with due attention to the 
value of the motor car in the field of 
transportation. Keep within the law 
and play safe! * * * 

Am I a Jay Driver? Ask yourself 
that question every time you get in 
your car. You may be a Jay Driver 
one day and a first-class operator the 
next. But if you start in each day 
with a determination to assume your 
full responsibility at the wheel and 
with a resolution to be vigilant and 
cautious at all times, you'li probably 
avoid the "Jay" label in your travels. 

Do you know what a Jay Driver is? 
He's the driver that doesn't signal ; 
who likes to blow his horn and frighten 
the poor pedestrian into fits. He's the 
driver who whirls around the blind turn 
and forgets that the manufacturer 
has equipped his car with a voice, 
lie's the driver who yowls at the glare 
of oncoming headlights, but never takes 
a look at his own. lie's the driver who 
turns around to chat with somebody in 
the back seat when he should keep his 
pitied to the road. He's the driver 
who doesn't know the meaning of court- 
esy and who feels that upon him alone 
has been conferred the divine right of 
the highway. 

We talk a great deal about the Jay 
Walker who ties up traffic on the 
street. It's time that we started to 
talk about the Jay Driver, who is a 
menace not only to himself, but to 
others wherever he goes. 

The Victory Highway Association 
is doing a great work for California. 
More than 50,000 copies of the maps 
of the Victory Highway from Kansas 
City to San Francisco have been dis- 
tributed to tourist information bur- 
eaus within the last thirty days from 
the association headquarters. 



13 



u>. 



focfl car 0/bera/i>d\EJ 
hj/ rp/iab/e 
Cnauffeuns 
wo moroud/ilj/ under^ 
stand t/te/'r Jbus/rtess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Graystone 270 

1620 Pine Street 

San Francisco 



Attention Club Members! 



Have 
You 
Sampled 
a 
Club 
Business 
Lunch 
at 
SINGLE- 
TON'S 
ALLEY 

CAT 

LUNCH 

INN? 



Delicious, Dainty and Decidedly Different 




CYCOU 

MOTOR. OIL 




me " 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. ■" 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAJi FRANCISCO 



Look for the 
GREEN and 
WHITE 
SIGN 



GENERAL 

GASOLINE & 
LUBRICANTS 



Meet Your 
General 
Dealer Today 



»*»»**■ 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 



Finance 



THE fifth annual California Industrial Exposition to 
be held October 17th to November 1st will be a very 
notable achievment in the promotion of the state's material 
resources. Angelo Rossi, president of the exhibition, in- 
vites the people of this state and the whole country to ob- 
serve the strides made since last year. The industries in 
the state will represent about $50,000,000. The exposition 
has taken great hold on the business and industrial part 

of this community. 

* * * 

Herbert Hoover told the Commonwealth Club "There 
have been three great steps in the recent development of 
our national government: the first was the establishment 
of the merit service; the second was the establishment of 
the budget. The third— the reorganization of the execu- 
tive functions of the government— is now going on and is 
infinitely more difficult than the other two. The character 
of the obstruction is more potent." 

* * * 

The Industrial Association of San Francisco offers a 
reward of $1000 for the arrest and conviction of the parties 
who on July 10 shot Charlie Knowls, an American Plan 
core-maker at the Fremont Street Plant of the Enterprise 
Foundry Company of San Francisco. This was a particu- 
larly cowardly attack, as a silencer was used on the rifle of 

the would-be assassin. 

* * * 

The New York Commercial says "The open shop is a 
wholesome experience for both the worker and his em- 
ployer and likewise a blessing to the community— Peace 
makes for steady employment and when unions dominate 

there is no peace." 

* * * 

The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals at Cleveland has 
knocked out the sympathetic strikes. 

* * * 

Trade with Africa has increased 240% since the opening 
of the World War. Manufactures form over three-fourths 
of the exports to Africa which is chiefly controlled by the 
great manufacturing countries of Europe. Coffee, rubber 
and cacao are the principal imports from Africa while we 
send about 857o of our exports in the form of manufactured 
goods, largely cotton goods in competition with the Euro- 
peans who own the greater part of the African continent. 

* * * 

Sales of gasoline at retail in California show a steady in- 
crease, figures for the first three months of 1925 show total 
sales amounting to 162,272,541 gallons. The Standard is 
a long way in the lead of the sales but its proportion of the 
volume sold is not as great as formerly. 

* * * 

Active trading in securities and the money market easy 
for borrowing in spite of financial activity are the marked 
features of the past month. There is some depression in 
certain manufactures, among which may be noted textiles. 
Buyers are conservative. 

* * * 

A curious and rather unexpected but quite natural de- 
velopment of the increased powers of transportation has 
been the effect upon retail traders, as regards purchasing. 
There is no need for the purchase of great amounts of mer- 
chandise at one time as shipments can now be so easily 
made. This fact has done much to abolish the old system 
of buying great quantities and has substituted what is 
called' "hand to mouth buying," meaning buying to meet 
the actual needs. The result ia that much of the uncer- 
tainty is removed from the small dealer. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California. 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 479,081.25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7lli Ave. 

HA1CHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4Jr£) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital »20,000,0O0 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Oflloe: 4S0 CALIFORNIA STREET 
llltl i ■!■; HEATHCOTE W, J. COD I.TIIAHD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone DOUC1.AS 2244 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVKnTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 

Snn Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



August 8, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 
(Continued from Page 11) 
securing the greatest number of signed pledges in an all- 
state movement toward the protection of California for- 
ests from devastating fires. This great worthy movement 
should be encouraged and the way the children of the com- 
munity are taking hold of the endeavor is a lesson and a 
precept for their elders. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 
Famous Humorist 
Bohemian Member 

Mark Twain, the world famous humorist was one of the 
original members of the Bohemian Club. Bret Harte and 
Charles Warren Stoddard were enrolled, too, at about the 
same time. Richard S. Ogden, familiarly known as Pod- 
gers, a correspondent of the New York Times was a mem- 
ber. Gen. W. H. L. Barnes and many other world's prom- 
inent men have been active in Bohemian Club affairs. 

* * * 
First Grove Play 

The first Grove play was presented in 1879 and as the re- 
sult of its success, members were so enthusiastic over their 
venture that they decided to buy the place. One member 
wishing to clinch the suggestion paid the sum of $20 down. 
I am quoting from a published article when I add : 

"It is related that the treasurer promptly spent the money 
for wine in anticipation of other donations and that he dis- 
bursed the liquor impartially to every one's great refresh- 
ment." 



GOLF 

(Continued from Page 10) 

Harry Newman, of Oakland, the retiring state president, 
was heard to yell, "(live mc liberty or give me breath." 

At the finish of the tournament several of the San Fran- 
cisco players held a post mortem at which something must 
have been decided, for every one who saw them in the eve- 
ning commented on what a wonderful 19th hole they had 
played. 



LIST OF ARRIVALS AT FEATHER RIVER INN, 
WEEK ENDING AUGUST 2ND 
Monday, July 27 
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Laubot, Oakland; J. M. Ryan and 
T. J, Nugent, San Francisco. 

Tuesday, July 28 
P.. P. Anderson, I. A. Marengo, M. L. Perasso, Jr.. and 
wife. Ali^s \mi;i Perasso, Mrs. and Mi^s !•". Ratye, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. F. Pressley, Page Pressley, G. B. Crawford and 
wife. (I. 1. Crawford and wife. Caroline D. Smith and F.liza- 
beth A. Smith, all of San Francisco. 

Wednesday, July 29 

Dr. and Mrs, Thos 11. Winslow, Piedmont ; Mrs. K. Rae, 
U. J. Rae and M. C. Rae ami Alice Rae. ('.alt. California; 
Dr. and Mrs. Robt, Duncan, Mr. and Mrs. K. 11. Donivan. 
Master K. M. Donivan, Mi<s Patricia Donivan. San Fran- 
cisco. 

Thursday. July 30 

J. L. Nagle, Sacramento; II. Rowe. Graeagle; H. Barton 
and wile. Sacramento: W. J. II. Hicks and wife. Sacra- 
mento: Mr. and Mrs. Fred j. Smith. Sonoma; Mrs. R. C. 
lump. Fruitvale; Mrs. Thomas Magee and Master Thomas 
Magee, III. San Francisco: Luther Martin and wife. Holly- 
wood; Win 1'.. Daly, Butte. Mont.; Tom I. von. Salt Lake 
City, Utah ; Mr. and Mrs. Tunnel!. Walker Mine. 
Friday, July 31 

Howard Robertson, F. D. Howell, Los Angeles; H. C. 



Stimile, Helen C. Spratt, Capt. and Mrs. Walker Rowsen, 
Tonopah, Nevada. 

Saturday, August 1 

L. Levy, H. Chapelle, Al Coney, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. 
Gabriel, Miss Cohern, San Francisco ; Harrison S. Robinson, 
Dr. Barney McElroy, Oakland ; Miss Clara Jackson, Mrs. 
Amy Sprague, Sacramento ; Mr. and Mrs. F. K. Jackson 
and Harry Jackson, Oakland ; Thos. D. Parker and wife, 
Belvedere. 

Sunday, August 2 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Waterman, Oakland; Miss Gotea 
Dozier, James F. Pressley, Jr., San Francisco. 



PROPER BREAKING IN OF A NEW CAR 

By Lloyd S. Johnson, Duesenberg and Auburn Distributor 

When your new car glides out of the salesroom gleaming 
and purring with promised speed — Slow Down ! After 
the first 1000 miles you can "step on it" with safety, but 
until then show it all of the consideration of a new born 
babe. 

Make your maximum speed limit 25 miles an hour and 
observe it. Then the engine metal will not get overheated 
and wearing surfaces will gradually become glazed and 
smooth. Often the treatment a car receives during its first 
1000 or 1500 miles has much to do with it service life. 

Also, get in the habit of inspecting the gas and oil before 
starting off. Any good gasoline will do, but your oil should 
always be of recognized standard quality. Choose one brand 
and stick to it. As a preliminary precaution, it is also well 
to test your brakes and see that they are equalized. 

Just like a human, a new car has to be broken in or 
"trained" to meet hard tests. Speeding, inexperienced hand- 
ling or particularly rough roads should be conscientiously 
shunned until the preliminary mileage is complete. 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the~~ 

VALLFYo/ the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms." 

Clean Roomi, Clean Linen. Clean Everything 

>ii.>ma Count t'i r am out Retort* and Mineral (Warm Waler) Sw 

Tank* From Thi« Hotel. 

Rale* Exceptionally Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 



FETTERS' HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Mas- 
seur in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming 
pool. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Rates, $18 up. 
Write George Fetters. Mgr.. or Peck-Judah. 



j MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

nUbsEKeni Shirts ItlOsUGtti 

I W? N --, 'SfiW 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
IS Keahvy Street Phone Keauny 3714 



i. 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

The original Pepper Chorus, — eight 
Creole beauties — have a Charleston 
number said to be unparalleled ; Scott, 
Allen & Lee broadcast "pep" in their 
act; Farrell and Chadwick are singers 
of ability ; Blanch Calloway is said to 
"strut" her way to instant popularity. 



Wilkes 

This is the last week of Lenore Ul- 
ric in "Kiki." This noted star has 
been repeating her success in New- 
York, here, in this story of a Paris 
street gamin. San Francisco is fortu- 
nate in having had an opportunity of 
seeing Miss Ulric in this role. Sup- 
porting her are Joseph Swickard, Fred- 
erick Vogeding and Alice Buchanan. 



Greater Movie Week 

Today ushers in Greater Movie Sea- 
son for San Francisco. The parade 
held today will be one of the most el- 
aborate events of its kind ever staged 
in this city. Many of the beautiful 
floats built for the parade in Los An- 
geles have been brought here for this 
event, and a dozen or more prominent 
screen luminaries will be in the pa- 
rade. 

Prominent men and women of na- 
tional as well as local prominence have 
given their endorsement to this move- 
ment, joining it to that recently given 
by President Coolidge in a letter to 
Will H. Hays, cinema czar, who is di- 
recting: the nation-wide celebration. 



The man who follows the "A. B. C." 
of safety which is "Always Be Careful," 
keeps within the legal limit of speed at 
all times. 



The exploration period of California 
falls in that great chronological period 
when the world was awakening from 
the slumbers of the middle ages. Bal- 
boa, Cortez, Vancouver, Sir Francis 
Drake and Vizcaino, are all names that 
stand out in the annals of the world's 
development. 

Then came the colorful period of In- 
dian legend and the life of new Spain, 
strangely contrasted with the era of 
the days of gold and the hardships of 
the pioneers who crossed the plains and 
came around the Horn in search of the 
treasure store of the snow-capped 
mountain barrier that guarded Califor- 
nia on its eastern frontier. History 
takes on a renewed interest when it is 
colored from the palette of romance. 
Travel over the storied highways of 
California and you will be like a child 
playing with a kaleidoscope, bewild- 
ered, yet ever pleased by the changing 
iridescence of color. 



Oceanic Steamship Company Appoints 
New Operating Officials 

There has recently been a sweeping 
re-organization of the Oceanic Line, 
historic carrier of the Pacific, which 
owns and operates a fleet of steamers 
between San Francisco and Sydney, 
Australia, by way of the Hawaiian, 
Samoan and Fiji Islands. 

This re-organization takes in the 
creation of an executive staff of three : 
Hugh Gallagher, operating manager ; 
M. F. Cropley, freight traffic manager, 
and H. N. Thomas, passenger traffic 
manager. All these men have had more 
than 20 years experience in the steam- 
ship business, and are among the best 
known traffic men in the United States. 

In making their selection of officials 
for its program of expanded activity, 
the Oceanic Steamship Company made 
an extensive canvass of shipping cir- 
cles throughout the country, and chose 
these three men as leaders in their field. 

The new appointments are in effect 
September 1st. Headquarters of the 
executive group are to be in the 
Oceanic Building, 2 Pine Street. 

Hugh Gallagher, appointed as op- 
erating manager, has achieved promi- 
nence and wide popularity in his ca- 
reer of steamship traffic direction. His 
activities in this field began in 1906, 
when he was placed in charge of op- 
erations of petroleum ships of the 
Standard Oil Company in Manila. Re- 
turning to the United States in 1910, he 
engaged in railroading, as superinten- 
dent of construction for Twohy Bros. 
Company. 

When the Pacific Steamship Com- 
pany was formed in 1916, Gallagher 
was made its agent at Juneau, Alaska ; 
going thence to New York City as gen- 
eral eastern agent, he had charge of 
the U. S. Shipping Board's vessels op- 
erated to and from Europe by the 
Pacific Steamship Company. He was 
transferred from New York to San 
Francisco in 1921, as assistant operat- 
ing manager of the Pacific Steamship 
Company. 

M. F. Cropley, the new freight traf- 
fic manager of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company, is a shipping man of long 
experience. He began in May, 1905 with 
the Alaska-Pacific Steamship Com- 
pany. In January 1915 he was made 
general agent of the Pacific-Alaska 
Navigation Company, and in 1916 as 
recognition of his valuable services, he 
was made assistant general freight 
agent at San Francisco. 

April, 1920, he was made assistant 
manager, and in September, 1921, he 
was transferred to Portland as man- 
ager of the Oregon district. He re- 
turned to this city in January, 1922 as 
assistant freight traffic manager, which 
position he has held up to the present 
time — thus constituting twenty years 
of continuous service with the Pacific 
Steamship Company and its predecessors. 



Pacific Radio Exposition 

Amateur radio operators are going 
to have an important place at the Pa- 
cific Radio Exposition to be staged in 
the Civic Auditorium August 22 to 28. 
They are to have an exhibit all their 
own, and will be able to make many 
experiments there. 

Two transmitters, one of 50 watts 
and another a 10 watt tube will be 
installed and operated by amateurs 
ranging in age from 16 to 60 years of 
age, — all members of the League. Mes- 
sages of greetings will be sent by these 
operators "No charge" to all parts of 
the United States and Canada for those 
attending the Radio Show. 

Operators having difficulties with in- 
terference can bring them to the "Police- 
man of the Air" who will be stationed 
at the exhibit during the seven days 
of the exposition. This Vigilance 
Committee is recognized by the United 
States Government as a valuable as- 
set in helping to solve problems con- 
fronting the radio operator. 

This is only one of many interest- 
ing features of this show. There will 
be daily stunts, musical programs, nov- 
elty entertainments, and there will be 
radio experts from all parts of the 
United States. It is expected there 
will be more than 100,000 radio fans 
attend the exposition. 

Manufacturers and dealers repre- 
senting every make and type of radio 
will have exhibits, and will help to 
make this the most elaborate ever held 
in this country. The main floor of the 
Auditorium has been divided into 200 
booths which have been leased to ex- 
hibitors. 

(Continued from Col. 2) 
H. N. Thomas, appointed passenger 
traffic manager of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship line is recognized as a leader in the 
transportation field. In 1907 he joined 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, 
advancing to the post of acting general 
passenger agent which he held until Oc- 
tober, 1915, when the old Pacific Mail 
Company retired from business. He then 
joined the China Mail Steamship Com- 
pany, organizing and conducting its pas- 
senger business as general passenger 
agent. It was in this position that 
Thomas displayed his executive ability 
and piloted his company through the try- 
ing period incident to its retirement from 
the trans-Pacific trade. 

Becoming a member of the staff of 
the Dollar Steamship line in 1923. 
Thomas took an active part in organizing 
the round-the-world service, being ap- 
pointed assistant general passenger agent. 
He is well known to traffic men through- 
out the United States and Europe. 

Each of the new operating officials of 
the Oceanic Steamship Company enjoys 
wide popularity in Pacific coast transpor- 
tation circles. 



August 8, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



1/ 



Mr. Blabbitt on Greater Movies 



AS I was saying to Rudolph Valentino's cousin's sister's 
aunt, the other day, "I am heartily in accord with 
Rudy, Charlie, Gloria, Tom and Rin Tin Tin, in hoping 
for greater movies." I neglected to state, however, that 
I should prefer them for more than one week, and also 
overlooked asking what the type of "greater" meant. We 
have nut-meg graters, cheese-graters and nerve-graters. It 
pays to be specific. You know, we have so many weeks, it is 
hard to keep track of what one is supposed to do, buy or 
talk about, from day to day. First comes "Sheet Week", 
when we are all expected to use sheets on our guest beds, 
then "Raisin Week", during which everyone should make 
his home brew, "Fur Week," which is rough weather for 
cats, and many others, too numerous to mention, let alone 
elucidate upon. 

However, to get back to greater movies. The movies 
are mostly a question of a few leading men and women, 
with good looking faces, and extras, with good shapes. 
There is an old saying, which goes, "You can't make a 
silk purse out of a sow's ear." This leads me to say, in 
turn, that you can make a movie actor or actress out of any 
person with a passable face or figure or a man or woman 
noticeably, or painfully lacking in either — yes you can — in 
a pig's necktie. 

Most of us will never be available or desirable as movie 
material. We lack that intangible something that causes 
the luckier ones to look well on the silver sheet. I, for 
instance, look well enough on an ordinary sheet, so long 
as I am well covered with blankets, but I am not at all sure 
how I would look, or how comfortable I should feel on a 
silver sheet. There is something about it all so luxurious, 
not to say prodigal, in this mental picture, that it makes 
the subject one that I just don't like to write about, and I'm 
not going to. 

I hope greater movies will not mean greater prices. 
There was a man in town last week, keeping company 
with fifty-two relatives, who are seeing the country, 
a la mode, at his expense. Just think, ten years ago, he 
could have taken them all to a fairly good movie t>>r ten 
cents a copy,, making a total expenditure of — ti.uure it cut 
for yourself. Today, this pour Fellow is lucky to gel in one 
of our palaces for less than four bits a head. If he i* spend- 
ing $70,000 on a national tour, S.vi.OOO of this must go into 
the coffers of America's second greatest industry. 

You know, here's the thing that makes me mad about the 
whole thing. Whenever I go to Los Angeles or Holly- 
wood. I try. in vain, to get into one or another of the stu- 
dios, and never yet have I succeeded in getting past the 
gates. I see members of the profession entering and leav- 
ing, but they never give me a tumble. Heartbroken, after 
repeated efforts. 1 wend my way back to this city. What 
do I see in the first movie theater, but a number of these 
self-same moving picture people, smiling and smirking from 
the screen, entirely unmindful of their recently high-hat- 
ting me. It seems to me that we small fry should be given 
an equal opportunity with heavyweight pugilists, big peach 
pickers and other notables, of seeing the inner works of 
the film factories we are helping to support. 

Greater movie promoters should get closer to their pub- 
lic, by being less distant to visitors, and hand out less bunk. 
through the pages of so-called movie magazines ; or, at 
least, let someone with a different view-point, write the in- 



terviews and descriptions published, from time to time. 
The only bits of real value in the average movie magazine 
are the two bits you have to pay for each copy. Of course, 
this isn't the movie companies' fault, but neither are the 
movies ours. 

Here's to the movies. May they get greater and greater, 
— without swelling up ! 



Customer — Can I change these pants at this counter? 

Clerk — Well, I'll tell you, mister, we have quite a few 
women shoppers, so maybe you'd better go to the dressing- 
room in the rear — Lehigh Burr 



Deadeye — You say Joe got killed? How come? 
Dick — Well, he stuck his head in that saloon and hollered 
fire. 

"Then what?" 

"They did." — Amherst Lord Jeff 



We Are Sixty Years YOUNG 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 



TRADEMARK. — _ .^^ * 

llllf Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities In engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angeles 





i ii ihanki.iv M8S 
Metal w in-k Apiirr- 

I ii i ii i ii c In Antiinm- 
hllen — Oxy- Acetylene 
\\ e lit I nc — II In ik - 
omilhinp. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHA& J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE VOIR rtRS WASHED AMI CREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Ratea. .Vic per day: $7. SO per month 

PHOMal DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Aolomohlln 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1925 




SUMMONS 

No. j r.KT(ii) 



N. W. CORNER 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES l 

San Francisco— Bnrling-ame 

Wc.i. 793 4T8 



Phone Suttsr 327S 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Skreve & Company) 

Clockmakeri and Watchmakers 

CHIME. ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Pont Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 
and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Action Brought In the Superior Court of the 
State of California In and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the Com- 
plaint Filed In the Office of the County 
Clerk of Said City and County. 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Waiter Samuel "Woodward, Plaintiff, vs. 
Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an 
action brought against you by the above- 
named Plaintiff in the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer the 
Complaint filed therein within ten days (ex- 
clusive of the day of service) after the ser- 
vice on you of this summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere 
within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
bonds of matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff and defendant, on the ground of de- 
fendant's willful neglect; also for general 
relief, aa will more fully appear in the Com- 
plaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the 
said Plaintiff will take judgment for any 
money or damages demanded in the complaint 
as arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for other relief demanded in the com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the 
Superior Court of the State of California, In 
and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
H. I. MULCKEVY, Clerk. 
By W. S. SHAFEK, Deputy Clerk. 

Dated July 27, 1925. 

AUSTIN LEWIS. 

473 Mills Building. San Francisco, Calif., 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 

No. 146,330 

SUMMONS 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought In the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint 
filed in the office of the County Clerk of said 
City and County. 

Frederick Marriott, Plaintiff, vs. N. F. Wil- 
son, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to: N. F. Wilson, Defendant. 

You are hereby directed to appear and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 
above, brought against you in the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, within 
ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and County; 
or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money 
or damages demanded In the complaint as 
arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for any other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the .Su- 
perior Court at the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, 

Dated April 30, 1924. 

[Seal] H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAGNETT<_>,. 

Deputy Clerk. 

AUSTIN LEWIS. Attorney for Plaintiff, 473 
Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 



All That Was Lacking 

Maude — Ferdinand has all the qual- 
ities that go to make a good husband 
but one. 

Ella— What is that? 

"He won't propose." — Judge, 1900. 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. No. 41,989. 
Dept. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
John Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within four (4) 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice to the said administrator, at his office. 
858 Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
ornia, which said last-named office the under- 
signed selects as his place of business In all 
matters connected with said estate of John 
Oliver, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, July 7, 
1925. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY, 
Attorneys for Administrator. 





•ibe better it gob- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6664 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cups were nerved at the Pan- 
ama. Paclfla International Exposition 



^. m % 



PIONEER 



The 
Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther It be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There la a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
___ printer or ata- 

^yU"MLiJ:l JTJiJJ| ^° u n s e a r m pV. hOW 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S56 
41 First Street, San Francisco 





BY CABIN STEAMERS FROM 
NEW YORK 

Direct Sailing, via Panama Canal 

THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

S70 Market St., San FrancWco 




WHERE TO DINE 




ICE CReA 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



Caroline Jones 

jiinclieon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 



L 






445 Powell St., 

San Francisco 



A rjuiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50— Also a la Carte 
Merchant's lunch 11 a. in. to - p. m, i ;i la carte). Private 'lin- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



BLANCO'S 



0*KnrrcII mid l.nrkln S(recl* Plume I ranklln II 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 
In the Rnesl cafe in America 

l.uiieheon I I I ::tO (<• _ |i. in.) - ... - T'e 

111 n ne r, Week Days __...._ si, M) 

Dinner, Numhivs initl llolidn>* ..... 91.7."* 



i. 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

03 Third Avenue. BAN M ITEO 



Vai urtng Soul hern ' booking 

■ 

p. m 
[ Holidays 
i 30 to 8 SO p m. only 
i i OSBD i'\ ER1 MOICD \\ 
iinii niork from Highway 




I l-^ln i Mm -v 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

DPI N B OH I H I" II DO P. M. 

1 NSI RPASSI D ' 1 WM 

C \IU 1 KOMI \RDT 

foraMrq ..I 

Galden Cat. P.Hi tjono 



CLIFF-HOUSE 

Plate Lunch 
Plate Dinner 
Sundav Dinner - - $1.00 



A l.i Carte .ii popular ; 



Banquet K 1 Rooms t 



! Phone 



Phone P 



Kk'IIXKK P. Ronmrs, Proprietor j 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF ' 

THEIR TEETH ! 

Some think thai n vigorous brushing once or twice a day in I 

inking very good care of them. HrUHhlng i* only n part of the I 

process. Jinny things can haiipen to your teeth which only :i I 

competent demist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. I 

I hey may not be ns mouihI hh you Imagine. A toothache means { 

trouble; do not wall for the ache. Watch your teeth and minis, t 

There are gum tmnltlcM thi>* will dcKtroy teeth fauler than I 

decay. Are your leeth soref Do your gums bleed? Call In today I 

and talk it over. It will cost nothing. 31 y nerve blocking sys- { 

tent blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. I 

: DR. W. W. H0AGLAND j 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" I 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. I 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; I rownx; Self Cleaning Bridge*! I 

Poroeliiln \\ mk and IloofleMs IMatea i 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters or' St. Dominic 



GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillman n Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The 1 1. .me of I he Book Lover 

Hare Books — First Rdi I ions-— Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Hunt. Morrell, etc.. of London 

Commissions En London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

I'hone Kearny 5816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

*/PAUL ELDER'S 

iAM) I'M I. II llllis l.lllltAHV 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



DR 


B 


W. 


HAINES 






| Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell 




DENTIST 


Hours 


9U4 


San Francisco 






Telephone C 


ouglas 


2949 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Soils Preucd B] H.Ki. I Only— Salb Called For and Delhr«r«d 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



. timl Cleaning 



'i&\ Post Stucst 

l\ VlRCIMl HllTFt 



M\ In kN CISCO 

I'iiom. Fmv.ll> 2310 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 
For Homes. Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 
KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 
j 1.10 Russ - Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 






Travel/ 



Sail around the world — cruise to tropical islands 
— visit the romantic ports of the Old World and 
the scenic wonders of the New — all at the ex- 
pense of The Chronicle. 

Winners of the magnificent travel tours to be 
awarded in The Chronicle Essay Contest may in- 
vite their own traveling companions. The expenses 
of both will be paid. Even spending money will 
be provided. It's easy to win one of these trips. 
Write to the World Tour Editor of The Chronicle 
to send you full particulars. 

s|j Forty Free Trips 

\ I /) from The 

Chronicle 'vM/try 






Time 




Card 



THE DEPENDABLE A 
motorists the shortest a 
tlnn from Oakland, San 
Vallejo, Sacramento. So 
nil points north. 

Automobile Fare 
The lowest ferry 



UTOMOBILE FERRY Route offers 

nd most direct means of transporta- 

Franolsco, and all points south, to 

noma, N'npii nnd Lake Counties and 

55c; Adults, 10c; Children, 5c. 
rates on San Francisco Ray. 



W 



4; 



Leave Oakland 


111 


Leave 


Vallejo 


Side 


at 


O 


Side at 


"SHORT 


-WAV" 


> 


MORROW COVE 


A.M. 


P.M. 


K 


A.M. 


P.M. 


teioo 


2:40 


111 


tS:45 


2:20 


6l80 


3:00 


<0 


OllS 


2:40 


7:00 


3:20 




«:45 


3:00 


7:30 


3:40 


111 


7:15 


3:20 


8:00 


4:00 


1- 


7:45 


3:40 


8:20 


4:20 


D 


8:20 


4:00 


8:40 


4:40 


Z 


8:40 


4:20 


9:00 


5:00 




0:00 


4:40 


0:20 


S:20 


£ 


0:20 


5:00 


0:40 


5:40 




0:40 


5:20 


10:00 


6:00 


X 


10:00 


5:40 


10:20 


6:20 




10:20 


0:00 


10:40 


6:40 


1 


10:40 


6:20 


11 :0(l 


7:00 


>- 


11:00 


0:40 


11:20 


7:20 


11:20 


7:00 


11:40 


7:40 




11:40 


7:20 


NOON 


8:00 


s 


NOON 


7:45 


12:00 


8:30 




12:00 


8:15 


p.m. 


0:00 


1- 


P.M. 


8:45 


12:20 


0:30 


K 


12:20 


0:15 


12:40 


10:00 


o 


12:40 


0:45 


1:00 


10:30 


I 


1:00 


10:15 


1:20 


11:00 


in 


1:20 


10:45 


1:40 


•11:30 




1:40 


•11:15 


2:00 


•12:00 


ill 


2:00 


•11:45 


2:20 


•12:30 


i 




•12:15 




•1:00 


1- 




•12:45 



'Saturdays. Sundays, Holidays — Extra Trips During Heavy 
Traffic. tSundays and Holidays only. 

AVEN J. HANFOHD, Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



SAVE MONEY! 

Buy Automobile 
Commute Books 



ROUND TRIP DAILY 

Including Sundays 

$23.45 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 



A. 0. Stewart 
President 



Habry E. Speas 
lice-Pres. and Gen7. Mgr. 



Serving the Southwest 

— through daily service via El Paso. San An- 
tonio, Houston to New Orleans — the ISetv 

Sunset Limited 



Luxurious travel accommodations — club car; 
n.'iiuhinl sleepers; observation car; barber, 
valet, maid; sbower-balhs. 

And Southern Pacific dining car service -na- 
tional standard in transportation catering. 

See, this way. Apache trail of Arizona. 

Connects at New Orleans with Soulhern Pacific 
ocean steamers to New York and with trains 
north and east. 



For fares, reservations, and full infor- 
mation, ask any agent — 



Back East 

low ronndtrip sum- 
mer excursion fares 
in effect. October 31 
return limit. 




Southern Pacific Lines 



Ferry Station 65 Geary Street Third St. Station 

Or Phone SUTTER 4000 




SAN FRANCISCO 



ews 




»* 





:3*. 



\ 






fo 



' 



■r^ 4 W^- 



LakeTahoe- reached by Southern Pacific Lines 



'BUILT TO OUTCLASS, OUTRUN AND OUTLAST ANY CAR ON THE ROAD 




Ownership Is Limited! 



! 




"The Qrand <Prix Car' 



LJ |"^EALTH alone cannot qualify a man 
\XJ for Duesenberg ownership. 

He must know art to appreciate the refined 
lines of the Duesenberg Straight Eight. 

He must know machinery to understand the 
power expressed in the subdued purr of the 
Grand Prix Motor. 

Duesenberg owners will ever be small in 
numbers but great in motor car satisfaction. 

LLOYD S.JOHNSON COMPANY 

1930 VAN NESS AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO 



]g 



l^) lEa J^j 



t£J _£} i£ 



g m s 



y} 




E»Ubll»h«d July 20. 1656 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published bv Frederick Marriott 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 2.35 Montgomery St San Francisco CnlilYrni',' 

Telephone Sutter 8535. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office' Street & Co 30 Co'rnhi 1 F r 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year. $6.00 Canada one year $6 00 ' 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 15, 1925 



No. 7 



THE FRIENDLY ROAD 

By E. Farrand Ross 



The Flapper flicked off her cigarette ash, gave a touch 
to the curl on her check, stretched, and rose from her chair 
on the porch of the hotel with a yawn. "This isn't the 
life for me," she announced; "Nothing doing; no excite- 
ment; don't know a fella with a car, so here I am parked 
for a week." 

The Woman of the World smiled ; "It is rather stupid," 
said she ; "I think I will take a nap until noon." She rose 
also, and prepared to follow the Flapper. 

"Just a moment," said I, and they both stopped. 

"What about a walk?" I went on; "now, wait, don't say 
you hate hiking; I don't care for strenuous hikes myself; 
but put yourselves in my hands, and we will all go ramb- 
ling. It's a cool and foggy morning, we all feel pretty 
fit, and I'll have you back in plenty of time to dress for 
lunch. How's that?" 

"Anything once," murmured the Flapper, while the 
Woman of the World drew her scarf around her shoulders 
and acquiesced by a little nod. A high fog lay over the 
Valley of the Moon; the hills were dark and remote and 
full of shadows; the voice of the brook near by hold a plain- 
tive note as if remonstrating at weather conditions, but I 
knew that it was just the day for a walk, and so we pro- 
ceeded to stroll through the grounds until we came to the 
open road that wound between huge shade tree-; up the 
quiet valley. 

The brooding silence over everything made its impress 
on our spirits, and for awhile even the Flapper's 
lively tongue was stilled. 

On either side of the highway orchards of prunes, 
quinces and pears bore heavily laden branches, the purple 
of the prunes blushing from among the green foliage, the 
fragrance of tin- quince coming to ns in warm breaths. 

I studied my companions with almost as. much interest 
as I gave to the surrounding country. Here were two per- 
fectly healthy, one might say, "strapping" women of leisure, 
who killed time in their various and numerous vacations 
by sitting on hotel porches and idly watching people come 
and go; by sitting on benches in the bathing houses and 
watching people go in and come out of the water; by sit- 
ting in lobbies and still watching coming and departing 
quests, with periodical interludes of eating and sleeping! 
tine could not even call them "butterflies" of fashion, for 
butterflies are at least active! 

Perhaps they were comparatively "well read?" I won- 
dered. 

Did they know why this pretty pastoral scene before us 
was appellated "The Valley of the Moon?" Oh, yes, in- 
deed; some book o, other of Jack London's. No, they 
hadn't read it Never seemed to get the time, somehow. 
Did they like walking? Well, no — so little to see. yon 
know ! 

Were they interested in trees, flowers, birds? 



They both looked at me rather askance. Of course they 
recognized some trees; for instance, that one over there 
(pointing to a feathery eucalyptus) that was a native tree, 
wasn't it? One saw so many of them in the country! 

A familiar call came from the top of a huge oak: "The 
chick-a-dees are here," I said, half to myself; "someway 
their little note makes me think of autumn; they used 
to visit me in autumn and winter, up on Russian Hill, 
in the city." 

A faint gleam of interest touched their faces; they had 
always wondered what those little gray birds were; they 
were so cute, sometimes hanging by their tiny feet, and 
always so bold and cheery! And alwavs calling, even in 
the blustering rain ! 

And that was a blue jay! They knew him. Noisy, thieving, 
fresh old thing, but mighty good to look at! 

And the quails! Forever asking: "Where are you? Where 
are you ?" 

The rattle of a truck behind us. and a cordial voice calling: 
"Want a lift'" which we had to decline with thanks. 

And further on, a little old, bent man leaning on a stick as 
crooked as Harry Lauder's, who passed us with a cheerful 
"Morning, morning!" 

Two sweet-faced Sisters of Mercy, trudging along in the 
dust, on some charitable errand bent, bowing and smiling at 
us. a fascinating dimple appearing in the younger woman's 
cheek. 

My companions' faces were gradually brightening, and they 
seemed to be absorbing some of the happy-go-lucky felicity 
of the road into their usually bored and blase systems. 

"Well," exclaimed the little Flapper, "Aren't people 
friendly? Isn't this fun? And I'm not a hit tired yet." 

The Woman of the World had taken off her shade hat. and 
the soft morning wind was playing havoc with her carefully 
marcelled hair; her airy scarf blew about her form like an 
orchid mist, and the dust on her immaculate white shoes ap- 
parently worried her not at all. 

"I never realized that there was so much life in the country 
places." she said ; "how much more one sees in a walk like this, 
than scurrying oxer the highways in a closed car!" 

We visited that morning, the library at Glen Ellen, which 
was donated by the Native Sons of the Golden West in memory 
of Jack London, in the name of "Truth. Lihertv and 
erance;" we rambled through an old hotel, its atmosphere 
fraught with memories that must have endured through at 
least fifty years: we stopped at the corner grocery, smelling 
of a mixture of strong soap and prunes, to get some ginger 
"pop"; we talked with tow-headed little children, who stuck 
their thumbs into their mouths, and got behind their mothers' 
skirts; and lastly, we asked the way to Jack London's house 
of a bareheaded woman trundling a cart before her, who I 
with her clumsy shoes and old-fashioned dress, like 
(Continued on Page 17 1 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 15, 1925 




At last it is entering the conscious- 
Market .Street Railways ness of some of the people in this 
city that the time is fast approach- 
ing when the Market Street Railways must be purchased in 
order to complete the city traffic system and to render pos- 
sible an economically sound method of transporting the 
citizens. 

So, there have been appearing articles dealing with the 
matter of the purchase of the Market Street Railways. Such 
articles as we have seen against the project I and they are 
appearing where one would expect them to appear — in the 
Hearst papers), are directed to the very cheapest and least 
pleasing of human instincts. The notion appears to be that 
if the people of the city wait long enough, they will get 
something from somebody for nothing. The argument is 
that the franchises are running out and therefore the lines 
are becoming less valuable; that if we wait until they have 
run out, the lines can be acquired for next to nothing. 

This point of view is very low. for it is obvious to the 
meanest intelligence that the owners of the Market Street 
Railways are entitled to a fair and just price for their prop- 
erties, and should not be driven into the last ditch. When 
the city was recovering from the fire and the wires of the 
railways went up in the burnt district, we were glad to hail 
the enterprise of the street railway companies that had faith 
in the future. We do not see the people of this city paying 
less than a just price for the properties in question. 

Outside of this matter, which is one of common honesty, 
the arguments of the opposition to the fair purchase of the 
street railways appear to be directed to the matter of the 
relative advisability of the plan as compared with other 
devices for spending public money, such as certain civic im- 
provements. Here the opposition is on safer ground, but it 
is certain that of all civic improvements at present contemp- 
lated, there are none that can compare in feasibility and 
adequacy with the consolidation of the street railroads. 



The University of California, hav- 
Stiffening Scholarship ing reached such a place that mere 
numbers are no longer any induce- 
ment, is beginning to turn its face toward the more impor- 
tant matter of quality. Scholarship is like art. one ounce of 
quality brings more distinction than tons of product devoid 
of that mysterious and potent factor. 

Thereis no doubt that for quite a long time the university 
has had to carry the load of ill-prepared students. The pre- 
paratory schools have sent over boys and girls whose knowl- 
edge of the elements of education, reading, writing and 
arithmetic is so slight that they could not advance in their 
college work. The university, at the expense of the tax- 
payer, has had to employ educated men, trained in higher 
educational. work, to supervise these students who should 
have not been allowed in the university. 

But, you ask. why? The question is unfortunately easily 
answered in a democracy like our own. The people of the 
state keep the university going, they want their children 
at the university. A rigidly honest board of examiners for 
entrants would eliminate a goodly per cent of those who 
apply for admission. Thereupon there would be much in- 
dignation among parents who refuse to credit the fact that 
their offspring is in any way inferior. These parents in the 
long run get up agitations and send assemblymen pledged 
to stop the "snobbery" in the university, that is to say, 
pledged to the destruction of any decent standards of schol- 
arship. 



While such a state of things exists, it is next to impos- 
sible to make the university at all what it should be, and 
it is quite unjust to students who are prepared and to dili- 
gent instructors, to keep back progress to the rate of march 
suited to the unprepared and unsatisfactory. 

We congratulate the university on at last beginning to 
make a stand for something like scholarship and wish it all 
success in its new "probation policy." 



Thomas F. Boyle, city and 
Our Bonded Debt Decreased county auditor of San Fran- 
cisco, has issued his report 
on the bonded indebtedness of this city. From this report 
it appears that there is an authorized, bonded indebtedness 
of $130,094,000. 

The bonds sold to June 30th last totalled $104,827,000 and 
the bonds redeemed to that time amounted to $26,201,000, 
leaving bonds outstanding to the close of the fiscal year 
amounting to $78,626,000. Additional bonds up to July 2nd 
redeemed, left an outstanding indebtedness of $76,567,400. 

As of June 30, authorized bonds, substracting those can- 
celled and not issued totalled $120,942,000, and unsold bonds 
were then $16,115,000. 

Sales of bonds in the last fiscal vear were $2,900,000, of 
which $1,900,000 was for the Relief Home and $1,000,000 
for Hetch Hetchy of the issue of $10,000,000 as of January 
1st. 1925. Bonds redeemed during the last vear amounted 
to $2,648,000. 

Unsold bonds are as follows: $9,000,000 of the Hetch 
Hetchy, 5 per cent issue of $10,000,000 of January 1st, 1925 ; 
$7,000,000 of the 5 per cent issue of public school bonds to 
the amount of $12,000,000 March 1st. 1923; $19,000,000 of 
the 4'/ 2 per cent Market Street Railway issue of July 10, 
1910 ; $40,000 of the garbage system, 5 per cent issue of 
$1,000,000 of July 1st, 1908; and $56,000 of the public li- 
brary 3y 2 per cent issue of $1,647,000 of June 30th, 1904. 

( )f outstanding bonds on June 30, the largest issue was 
$40,000,000 of San Francisco Water, A]/ 2 per cent of Tulv 
1, 1910; and other notablv large issues were $7,200,000 Civic 
Center, 5 per cent of July 1st, 1912; $5,000,000 school, 5 
per cent of March 1st, 1923, and $4,030,000 fire protection, 
5 per cent of July 1st, 1908. 



Norman Hapgood made a very apt 
England and France statement the other day when, in 
comparing the relative positions of 
England and France, he said that England was financially 
sound and economically distressed, while France was fi- 
ancially unsound and economically prosperous. 

The whole questions of finance in the two countries 
must be regarded from that attitude. England is financially 
sound because she has met her debts, arranged for payment, 
restored the pound sterling to par and carried the burden 
of the war and lean years by taxation. France, on the 
other hand, has paid no debts, cannot make her budget bal- 
ance, has issued masses of paper money which have depre- 
ciated the franc and instead of limiting her expenditures 
on armaments has created great amounts of new fighting 
material, which, of course, produces no returns. 

In the long run, France will have to meet the issue. She 
cannot go on borrowing money to meet her current ex- 
penditures without coming to the end of the tether. When 
that point is reached, the matter of payment will c^me 
up, and with it the hateful taxation which must result. 
It remains to be seen what effect this will have on French 
politics. It is enough to say that no French statesmen face 
the future with any equanimity. 

On the other hand, for the present, the French people 
are prosperous and do not trouble themselves about the 
governmental debts which in the long run must overtake 



August 15, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



them. The British working-people, on their part, suffering 
from unemployment and confronted with the prospect of 
reduced wages, are not so sure about the truth of the hon- 
esty-the-best-policy adage. But they will in the long run 
be better off. 



China does not settle down. This 
The Chinese Unrest fact contradicts the whole theory 
on which the British treatment of 
the situation rests. According to the notions of the foreign 
office in London, the Chinese agitation was merely a super- 
ficial disturbance, due to agitators from the outside. A little 
firmness, a little patience, a little dignity, and the whole 
Chinese movement was expected to quiet down and con- 
ditions preceding the unrest to be restored. 

We have had the firm treatment. It is the same sort of 
firm treatment which has been meted out time and time 
again and which so far from mending matters, has really 
accentuated trouble and caused more irritation than it has 
suppressed disorder. The shooting of the students in the 
parade at Shanghai has had a bad effect, not only upon 
the natives of China but has been adversely commented upon 
by those elements of the whites who are in touch with the 
Chinese and are invaluable agents for white control, — the 
academic and social-welfare Europeans and Americans ; 
mostly, to our credit be it said, the latter. Firm treat- 
ment has driven us to the point where (ireat Britain is 
threatening to blockade Chinese ports, and has already 
called up all her naval reserves residing in China. This 
is the way that firm treatment is apt to end. A blockade 
will surely not increase the love that the Chinese ought 
to have for those who are in occupation of their land and 
who have their own police and courts. 

This country would willingly call a conference I" settle 
affairs and to restore to the Chinese some of that pride of 
which recent occurrences have deprived them, without 
which no people can exist satisfactorily, either to them- 
selves or to other peoples with whom they arc brought into 
contact. But the Europeans have a notion that such a con- 
ference is too good for the Chinese until they behave better, 



The decision of the Shipping Board 
Ford and the Ships to sell two hundred vessels to Henry 
Ford, marks the close of the war ex- 
periment in ships and accentuates tin- curious faculty which 
Mr. Ford has for seeing money where most other people 
would onl) sec liabilities 

Nobody will accuse Henry Ford of Wastefulness or ex- 
travagance. His name is almost a motto for carefulness 
and prudence in the organization and management of in- 
dustry, lie has experimented in Standardized production 
on a scale which has been never paralleled and. as a mat- 
ter of fact, never has been even approached. The British 
stand open mouthed at Wembley, watching the proo 
of the making of the Ford car. Such detailed mechanical 
skill combined wkh such economy in motion is a pheno- 
menon not to be seen outside the factory of this man. who. 
whatever uia\ be his faults. i s unquestionably one "i the 
greatest of modern wealth-producers. 

When such a man makes a purchase of two hundred 
ships for the price of $1,706,000, we may rest assured that 
he sees his money in it at least several times over. That is 
more than the Shipping Hoard does The gentlemen that 
compose the body charged with the care of the national 
ships have lain awake nights, but have produced no returns 
upon the national investment. Now. a private person will 
step in and at the touch of his wand, that which was junk 
in the hands of the government will suddenly become gold 
and will bear profit to the benefit of that private person. 



The moral seems to be obvious. It is a moral which 
has been repeated over and over again, namely, that gov- 
ernment in industry means failure and loss, whereas in- 
dustry in the hands of private individuals who know how 
to manage it, is a source of wealth not only to the private 
persons but to the nation also. 



Jubilee Euthusiasm in Mining Districts 

The history of the famous Mother Lode district will be 
told in fitting picturesqueness of Admission Day by the 
Native Sons and Daughters of Calaveras County. Angels 
Parlor of Angels Camp, and Chipsa Parlor of Murphys, are 
not strong in numbers, but they promise a display that 
will rival the best in the big pageant. 

Replicas of the cabin of Mark Twain and the first bank 
in California opened by D. O. Mills, will be shown. The 
famous Big Trees of Calaveras will be one of the float fea- 
tures. 

Dr. G. F. Pache, district deputy grand president of 
Angels, reports that the Diamond Jubilee is arousing much 
enthusiasm throughout the mining regions. The Board 
of Supervisors promptly came to the front with financial 
aid that will insure a creditable display by the Calaveras 
parlors. 

Grand Secretary John T. Regan states that never before 
in the history of the order has there been such widespread 
interest as there is being shown throughout the state to- 
ward the Jubilee. 

Charles A. Koenig announces that the parade will be 
exactly three miles in length. Supervisor [antes B. Mc- 
Sheehy. who is looking after float features, and George 
II. Barron, in charge of pageantry, say that splendid pro- 
gress is being made by their committees. 

Judge Fletcher A. Cutler. Grand President N. S. G. \\ '.. 
was the principal speaker at an enthusiastic meeting last 
night in Native Sons' Hall. Harry Herman and Julius 
Gaedke, of Stockton parlor; Dr. Mayhew of Palo Alto, and 
John Eaten of San Jose brought interesting reports from 
their respective organizations. 



Community Chest 

The non-sectarian scope of the services rendered the needy 
of the city by the Community Chest fund is well illustrated by 
reports on file at the Community Chest offices in the Sharon 
Building from the organizations engaged in relief work among 
children and families. 

Among these organizations of helpfulness are the large As- 
sociated Charities, which is the largest children's agency and 
family relief society in the city; the Eureka Benevolent So- 
ciety, a Jewish institution and the oldest relief society in the 
West; the Catholic Ladies' Aid Society and the kittle Giil- 
dien's Aid, also a Catholic organization. 

In addition to these associations, which are supported chiefly 
from Community Chest funds, there are a number of societies 
dealing chiefly with foreign groups of the city, as the Italian 
Hoard oi Relief, the French Benevolent Society, German 
Ladies' General Benevolent Society, and other old established 
relief organizations, as the Doctors' Daughters and the San 
Francisco Fruit and Flower Mission, and the Lutheran 
Welfare Board. 

In many humble rooms in the city live old people, invalids 
'i cripples, who receive each week from one of these organiza- 
food and occasional necessary articles of clothing. Many 
families, where the father is ill. are tided over the period of 
distress by food and milk for the babies. Widowed mothers 
are assisted in keeping their families together until the chil- 
dren can be self-supporting. That is Community Chest serv- 
ice to San Fran,- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August J 5, 1925 




ASSURES WW 



OBEY NO u/AND BUI PLEASURE'S 

__ Tom Moone. 




San Francisco Symphony 

THE sale of subscription tickets for 
the coming season of the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony is now on at Sherman & 
Clay Co.'s box office, and the manage- 
ment reports that the sale of seats lias 
already greatly exceeded that of the same 
period last year. 

The series of concerts to be held a' 
the Curran Theater will open Oct. 23, and 
will consist of thirty-four concerts. These 
are divided into three separate series,— 
twelve Friday afternoon concerts, given 
fortnightly, twelve Sunday afternoon 
concerts at which the Friday programs 
are repeated, and ten popular Sunday 
concerts, the latter coming on alternate 
weeks with the Symphony pair. 

Season tickets will be ready October 

1. and the management urges an earh 

selection. 

* * * 

Elwyn Series 

Margaret Matzenauer, contralto of the 
Metropolitan Opera Co., will be heard in 
recital on the Elwyn Artist Series dur- 
ing the coming season. Madame Matzei- 
auer's appearance, will be one of ten sub- 
scription concerts sponsored by the \\ olf- 
sohn Musical Bureau, Inc.. through the 
agency of the Elwyn Concert Bureau. 

Other attractions to appear in this 
scries are: Roland Hayes, negro tenor. 
Edward Johnson, tenor, Cecilia Hansen, 
violinist, Maria Kurenko, soprano. Vi- 
cente Ballester, baritone, Toscha Seidel, 
violinist, Thamar Karsavina and her lial- 
let, with Pierre Vkadimiroff, London' 
String Quartet, joint recital of I [ulda La- 
shanska, soprano, and Felix Salmond, 
English 'cellist, and Benno Moiseiwitsch, 
pianist. * * * 

San Francisco Opera Co. 

The complete repertoire fin- the San 
Francisco Opera Company for the com- 
ing season is as follows: Saturday, Sep 
tember 19, "Manon"; Monday, Septem- 
ber 21, "Samson and Delilah" ; Tuesday. 
September 22. "Tosca"; Thursday, Sep- 
tember 24. "Barbiere Di Siviglia" ; Sat- 
urday matinee, September 26, "Anima 
Allegra"; Monday, September 28, 
"Aida"; Wednesday. September 30. 
"Martha": Friday. October 2. "Amore 
Dei Tre Re." 

There is a long list of notable artist^ 
and Gaetano Merola, general director 
of the company is making every effort 
to achieve for this list of productions an 
artistic success. 



By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 

Auditorium 

Saturday, Sunday and Monday even- 
ings, August 15. 16 and 17 will be held 
the Pacific Saengerfest at the Civic Aud- 
itorium. The solists will be Julia Claus- 
sen, Walter (labor of the Metropolitan 
( Ipera Company, Grace Widemann of 
the Berlin ( Jpera Company, and Stella 
Raymond Nought, a San Francisco ar- 
list. who sang here last year with the 
San Carlo Opera Company. There is a 
large chorus — 800 voices and an orches- 
tra of sixty-five under the direction of 
Frederick Schiller. 

* * * 

Capitol ~ ' w i 

This is the last week of the engage- 
ment of "Lightnin" " at the Capitol 
Theater. 

Thomas Jefferson in the title role, lives 
up to the traditions of great stage an- 
cestry, and his performance as "Light- 
nin' " Hill Jones is highly commended by 
all who see the play. 

Another fine performance is Bessie Ba- 
con as the frivolous divorcee whose ac- 
li' ns, especially in the courtroom scene, 
provoke much merriment. 

Mrs. Frank Bacon as "Ma" Jones also 
does line work. Others in the cast are 
lack Marvin, Frank Thornton, Myles 
McCarthy, William Wagner. Robert 
Lowe, Felix llanev. liarbara Gurney, 
Marguerite Miller. Genevieve Lyle and 
many others. 

* * * 

Curran " TJ J) 

That delightful musical comedy. "No, 
No, Nanette" continues to draw capacity 
audiences at the Curran theater. Nancy 
Welford and Taylor Holmes, together 
with a splendid cast (if principals and a 
line loi iking chorus of girls and bovs, 
have made a great hit with San Francisco 
theater goers. 

The music is tuneful and catchy, and 
"Tea For Two." ami "I want To lie Hap- 
py" are particularly so. 

* * * 
Alcazar 

"Little Old New York," Rida Johnson 
Young's coined)- of the Manhattan of a 
hundred years ago, will open at the Al- 
cazar tomorrow evening, bringing with 
it sweet-scented humor, charmingly 
beautiful stage pictures, bewitching 
gowns of the costume period, colorful 
romance to fascinate the beholder. 

Henry Duffy will have the role of Lar- 
ry Delevan. which will give this popular 



actor-producer another splendid chance 
tn essay one of those characterizations 
which have made him an outs an ling 
feature of the productions at this theater. 
Dale Winter will he seen in the part of 
an adorable girl masquerading as a boy, 
and while it is hard to visualize her in 
anything but a dainty, charming fem- 
inine part, it is said that she makes an 
equally charming boy. 

Mr. Duffy has secured the services of 
Frederik Vogeding and Alice Buchanan, 
recently of the "Kiki" company, both of 
whom will be valuable additions to his 
splendid organization. ( Hhers who will 
he seen in the cast are Walter Regan, 
Dorothy La Mar, James Donlan, Charles 
Gregg, Hal Davis and Guy D'Ennery. 

* * * 
Columbia 

I diver White's new play, "Smiling 
Danger" proved a veritable triumph for 
Frank Keenan Monday night, when he 
opened at the Columbia Theater. George 
Graglund, discredited attorney is the 
"smiling danger" in the piece, and was 
powerfully enacted by Keenan, who has 
added another great triumph to his al- 
ready long list of notable characteriza- 
tions. 

It is the grim drama of three men and 
their wives, and of what one of the men 
did to wreck all three of the homes; an- 
other died to prevent it. and the third — 
sneered at by- everybody — finally solved 
and readjusted the intricate problem. 

Bertha Mann was great in the part of 
one of the wives; Margaret Keenan shone 
as the daughter of the murdered man; 
special mention must he made of the 
work done by Louis Dean. Fleming Ward 
and Harry Fenwick. 

* * * 
President 

Tomorrow starts the tenth week of 
the popular attraction at this theater, — 
"The Pest People", with no sign of 
abatement on the part of the pleasure- 
loving public. 

This play has an appeal to everyone, 
and this acounts for its tremendous draw- 
ing power. Norman Hackett and Mari- 
on Lord carry the burden of the action 
of the play in a most capable manner, 
and the rest of the line east lend them 
splendid assistance. 

* * * 
Loew's Warfield 

"N T evcr the Twain Shall Meet." Peter 
11. Kyne's enchanting story of the South 



August 15, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ALEXANDRIA \ p|ctures 
Genry and 18th j 


ALCAZAR } Henry Duffy Players 
O'Parrell nr. Powell ( "Little Old New York" 


CALIFORNIA } " Th e Trouble With 
4th and Market ] Wives" 


cameo 1 " Chin - chin ;, China - 

r man 
OSfl Market St. J Lon chaney 


CAPITOL | hi i-htr.li,"- 
Market and Ellis f Lightnm 


CASINO 1 

Mason and Ellis J Pictures 


CASTRO } 

42B Castro St. J Pictures 


COLISEUM 1 

Clement and 8th J Pictures 


COLUMBIA ) <io~iii»- n,.,.,> 

~ bmiling Danger 
Eddy and Mason j 


CURRAN I Nanette" 
Geary nr. Mnson y 


EGYPTIAN ( Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE \ „ . .„ 
„ „ . ,™ . r Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor j 


HAIGHT 1 , 
HatehtatCole j PiotureS 


IMPERIAL { Douglas Fairbanks 
1077 Market St. j "Don Q, Son of Zorro" 


LOEWS WARFI'ELD ) "Never the Twain 
1(88 Market St. J Shall Meet" 


MAJESTIC J 

Mission between f Pictures 

20th nnd 21st ) 


METROPOLITAN 1 

„.__ .. , „ 4 r Pictures 

2055 Union St. ) 



NEW FILLMORE 

1320 Fillmore 



Pictures 



NEW MISSION 
2BB0 Mission 


j 




ORPHEUM 
O'Fnrrell and Powel 


1 
J 


Vaudeville 


PANTAGES 
Market at Mason 




Vaudeville 


POMPEII ) 
Next door io Granada^ 


Pictures 


PORTOLA 
7T» Market 


I 
I 


Pictures 


PRESIDENT 
Market & McAllister 


1 

1 


"The Best People" 


ROYAL 

urn Poik st. 


1 
I 


Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS 

HUM Market 


/ 
\ 


Pictures 


SUTTER 

Sutter and Stelner 


X 
1 


Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 

O'Farrell nr. Powell 




Pictures 


WILKES 

Geary and Mason 


s 


"White Cargo" 


WIGWAM 
Mission anil S8a 


1 

1 


Pictures 



Sea Islands, begins at this theater today. 
This is a Cosmopolitan production, di- 
rected by the celebrated Maurice Tour- 
neur, and was picturized in Tahiti and 
Moorea, two of the famous islands of the 
South Sea group. 

The cast includes such famous players 
as Anita Stewart, Bert Lytell, Huntly 
Gordon, Justine Johnstone, George Seig- 
mann, Lionel Bellmore, William Norris, 
Emily Fitzroy, Princess Marie de Bour- 
bon, and Florence Turner. 

Fanchon and Marco will present "That 
Haunting Melody" with Waring's Penn- 
sylvanians and Mildred Melrose, sixteen 
Sunkist Beauties with Gwen Evans and 
Rosebud Morris. 

Lipschultz wil entertain as usual with 
his Music Masters with a specially ar- 
ranged program. 

Granada 

The world premiere of Victor Flem- 
ing's picturization of Harold Bell 
Wright's latest novel, "A Son of His 
Father," will be given, beginning today, 
at the Granada. The picture was 
months in the making and the cast 
includes Bessie Love, Warner Baxter, 
Walter McGrail, George Kuwa, Carl 

Stockdale and others 

* * * 

Orpheum 

There is a fine new bill at the Or- 
pheum this week, headed by Ben Bard 
and Jack Pearl, late of the "Artists and 
Models" in one of the funniest acts in 
the two-a-day, called, "A Log of 
Laughter." 

Another notable feature of the bill 
is the re-entry into vaudeville of the 
eminent dramatic star, Miss Sarah 
Padden, supported by William B. 
Davidson and a special cast of players 
in a revival of that old favorite, "The 
Clod." 

Rose and Arthur Borland and Sa- 
ranoff and Company, including Ed- 
ward Heffe and Meryle Sisters will be 
seen in "Pictorial Flashes," the latest 
conception of Chauve Souris ; Ann 
Greenwav in "Samples De Luxe," as- 
sisted by Sam Gould ; June Pursell 
with Ron Wilson's Collegiate Six in 
"Favorites of the Air" : Xate Peipzig 
in "A Young Man to Be Watched"; 
the Four Harmony Kings, a symphony 
in color and Pelermo's Dogs in a nov- 
eltv act. complete the bill. 

* * * 
Wilkes 

"White Cargo." that dynamic play 
which recently played at the Wilkes is 
returning for another engagement with 
an entirely new cast. Marcela Zabala. 
popular San Francisco society girl will 
appear in the role of Tondeleyo. Miss 
Zabala is the daughter of Mrs. Ernest 
Wilkes of this city and Monterey, and 
a sister of Mrs. Lindsay Howard, a re- 
cent bride. Both are well known here. 
(.Continued on Page 10) 



Coming Events 

The following fairs, shows, exhibitions 
and celebrations will be held at points lo- 
cated on or near SOUTHERN PACIFIC 
LINES in the next few months: Aug. 
14-16, Pacific Saengerfest, Civic Audi- 
torium. San Francisco; Aug. 19-22, Sec- 
ond Annual Frontier Round Up, Salt 
Lake City; Aug. 22-27, Pacific Radio 
Exposition, San Francisco ; Aug. 27-29. 
Dons of Peralta Festival, Oakland ; Aug. 
27, Potato Day Celebration, Stockton ; 
Aug. 27-Sept. 2, San Joaquin County 
Fair, Stockton ; Sept. 2, Auto Show, Oak- 
land ; Sept. 4-7, Lassen County Fair, 
Susanville ; Sept. 5-6, "Legend of the 
Pioneer," Mt. San Jacinto; Sept. 5-12, 
Diamond Jubilee Celebration, San Fran- 
cisco; Sept. 5-13, California State Fair, 
Sacramento; Sept. 7-8, Melon Carnival, 
Turlock; Sept. 7-12, Baldwin Park Fair, 
Baldwin Park, Sept. 9, Peninsula Kennel 
Club Show, San Mateo ; Sept. 9, Histori- 
cal Pageant, Orange ; Sept. 9, Grape Fes- 
tival, Escondido; Sept. 9-11, Spanish Fi- 
esta, Glendale ; Sept. 10-12, Polk County 
Fair, Dallas, Ore.; Sept. 11-13, Marin 
County, Farm Festival, Novato ; Sept. 
14-20, Stanislaus County Fair, Modesto; 
Sept. 15-19, Prune and Apricot Fiesta, 
Mountain View; Sept. 15-19, Tulare 
County Fair, Tulare ; Sept. 16-20, Hum- 
boldt County Fair, Ferndale; Sept. 16- 
20. Ventura County Fair, Ventura ; Sept. 
17-19, Shasta County Fair, Anderson; 
Sept. 18-19, Ventura County Kennel 
Club Show. Ventura; Sept. 20-28, Santa 
Clara County Fair, San Jose; Sept. 21- 
26, Glenn County Fair, Orland ; Sept. 
22-25, Lane County Fair, Eugene, Ore. 
(To be Continued Next Week) 



A Competent Service 

"It's a wise child who knoweth its 
own father," but it's a wiser motor- 
ist who recognizes his own car after 
it has been rejuvenated by the Auto 
Service Plus, at the northwest corner 
of Van Ness Avenue and Ellis Street, 
for this service includes the cleaning, 
oiling, greasing and polishing in every 
detail of both the exterior and interior 
of your automobile. This service is so 
prompt and efficient that you can run 
your car in and inside of fort}- minutes 
out she comes like new. These peop- 
ple have handled so many thousand 
cars and the men have become so com- 
petent in their work, that nothing is 
ever overlooked by them. Try this 
service and be convinced, 
y. ............ ....... 

I Where to Spend Your Vacation 
Hotel Claremont 

On tke Edge of the Berkeley HUN 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Kev Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 15, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Treasure Hunts Still 
Society's Engaging Fad 

FASCINATING, tantalizing treasure-hunts are still fa- 
vorite diversions of society. 

The surprising feature of these treasure hunts is that 
each one of them has a new element of suspense and allure- 
ment. Participants know the general trend of the hunt- 
ing parties, but they never do know just what to expect 
in the way of innovations or contact. 

Besides, there is always a thrill at the finish no matter 
how exciting the start may have been. It is this sense of 
expectancy which adds zest to the game and makes ardent 
devotees of those engaged in the spurring sport. 

Two recent treasure-hunts vie for favor in the realm of 
society among the Peninsula set and those of the Trans-Bay 
families. Probably one of the most thrilling treasure hunts 
of the entire season was staged recently by the Lewis Hill 
family at Pebble Beach. 

The dash in search of the treasure extended from • ■ n l 
end of the Monterey peninsula to the other. The number 
of treasure seekers filled at least twenty-five high-powered 
cars. The start was made from the home of Lewis Hill with 
the quotation, " — and Cabbages and Kings*' from "Alice 
in Wonderland" for a clue. There is a place in Carmel, a 
pretty shop it is, named, "Cabbages and Kings." So that 
was easy for at least a while. 

From Carmel the hunt led the merry makers to the 
Mystic Maze of Hotel Del Monte. And anyone who has 
tried to work his way to the center of the Maze and then 
find his way out again — knows that the trick is not easily 
turned. So they lingered for quite some time, for behind 
those hedge-bordered pathways lay the second clue to the 
treasure. 

The next place in the line of success was the Robert 
Louis Stevenson home in historic Monterey. The clue 
from this notable home of California's famous writer led 
to the Pebble Beach Riding Stables, right in the heart of 
Del Monte forest. * * * 

Seventeen-Mile Drive 
Route of Treasure-Hunt 

The Seventeen-Mile Drive, edged its entire length with 
wonders of the sea and border-lands, offered an alluring 
section of the delightful treasure-hunt in which the society 
set engaged. After racing their machines along the fa- 
mous drive, the contestants found their clues leading di- 
rectly to the old "Ghost Tree." 

The Monterey Peninsula Country Club was the next 
place in the sequence of the treasure-trove. Then, the 
Carmel Bathhouse; next, the Carmel Forest Theater, 
nestled among the pine trees and sweet-scented boughs, 
and last, the final spurt to the beach atStillwater Cove near 
the landing of the Del Monte Yacht Club. 

Chest of Gold 

A chest containing gold pieces was the reward of clever 
Mrs. Reginald Johnson who discovered the "treasure" in 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

8S0 lluah Street, Iletneen Powell and Stock-inn. San Pranelaeo 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



this fascinating hunt. Her luck (or. was it her unswerving 
persistency?) was all the more exciting when it was dis- 
covered that another of the treasure-seekers had been sit- 
ting on the location where the chest was found, but had 
just missed the spot by digging in a circle around the place. 
Society folks who participated in this treasure hunt in- 
cluded, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hill, Mr. and Mrs. Reginald 
Johnson. Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Crocker. Mr. and Mrs. R. L. 
Leonard, Mesdames Byington Ford. J. F. Neville and Harry 
Munt. and the Misses Helen Crocker, Bobby Burke, Mary 
Easton. Eliot Boke, Ysabel Chase, Willette Allen, Maud 
Hill, and Messrs. Winsor Jesselyn, Joseph Clark. Gail 
Burke, Winthrop Saltus. Charles Crocker, Francis Hixon. 
Lewis Hill fr.. Michael Murrav. 



Marin County Has Treasure Hunt 

.Mr. and Mrs. Milieu Griffith and Mr. and Mrs. John 
Cushing gave a delightful treasure hunt in Ross a fort- 
night ago with friends from "around-the-bay" set as guests. 
Hours of driving through the shaded lanes and thorough- 
fares of Marin County lured the treasure-hunters back to 
the place where the treasure was finally unearthed. Dan- 
cing concluded the hunt. 

* * * 

Famous Writer Succumbs to Illness 

I 'en Women throughout the entire nation were grieved 
to receive word last Monday of the death of Margaret 
Pearson (Mrs. Isaac Pearson), one of the founders and 
first presidents of the National League of American Pen 
Women. 

In a telegram received from Mrs. Edna Colman. of Wash- 
ington, D. C, national president, the sad message was 
conveyed to local Pen Women of the passing of their great 
friend and leader. Mrs. Pearson. During the initial execu- 
tive work of the National League Mrs. Pearson established 
literary prestige for Pen Women and set a criterion for 
executive standards which others in their turn, have main- 
tained. 

Well known for her own literary achievements, Mrs. 
Pearson was especially loved and revered for her great 
human qualities and her unswerving optimism. She had 
a wealth of sterling information always at hand which she 
distributed liberally among her constituents. California. 
particularly, was held in high esteem by the former na- 
tional executive and it was here that she hoped to spend 
some of the remaining days of her life. 

Thousands of sympathetic messages were sent to Mrs. 
Colman. the presiding officers of the National League of 
American Pen Women in the national headquarters at 
Washington, D. C, these messages to be extended to the 
family of the loved Mrs. Pearson and to Pen Women of 
her native land. 

* * * 

Friends of Mrs. John Aiken Branch, nee Marion Stovel, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Stovel, and grand- 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



August 15, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. James L. 
Martel, were shocked to learn of her fatal ill- 
ness in a message which conveyed word of 
her passing away, Monday, August 3, in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. Mrs. Branch belonged to one 
of the oldest pioneer families of this city where 
she was born and reared, and where she was 
a great favorite in social circles. She was a 
great beauty and only 28 years old. It was 
while visiting the John Kerr Branch family, 
a very old and aristocratic Virginia family that 
she was taken ill with pneumonia. The fu- 
neral took place in Richmond, where she was 
buried in the family vault of that city. 
* * * 

Bon Voyage Luncheon 

Mrs. Perley A. Young gave a luncheon at 
the Fairmont Hotel in honor of Mrs. Joseph 
Cahen of the Chancellor Hotel, who sailed on Au- 
gust 14 for Europe, to be abroad one year. 

The table decorations were beautiful. In the 
center was a boat made of flowers, the colors be- 
ing the Diamond Jubilee, and adorned with Amer- 
ican and foreign flags. The place cards were 
boats carried out in the same color scheme. Guests of Mrs. 
Young to bid Mrs. Cahen "Bon Voyage" were : 

Mesdames Edward T. Maples, Henry Barker William 
Erick Smith, Harry A. Gonden, Albert I. Loeb, Walter R. 
Jones, John Zeeman, James Oppenheimer, Henry Baer. 

* * * 
Party at Carmel 

Captain and Mrs. Luther R. Moore entertained a num- 
ber of their friends at a dinner at Tea House in Carmel re- 
cently, after which they took their guests to the Forest 
Theater to witness a performance in which Mrs. Donald 
C. Hawley, wife of Captain Havvley, U. S. A., was the 
prima donna. Those enjoying Captain and Mrs. Moore's 
hospitality were : 

Majors and Mesdames William W. Wordon Sloan Doak, 
Thomas D. Hurley, Mrs. John Boyce Salt Lake City, Lieu- 
tenant Bryant Davis. 

* * * 

Mrs. J. F. Wallace, of Berkeley, entertained at tea in 
Laurel Court of the Fairmont last Saturday afternoon, in 
honor of her daughters, Miss Irene Wallace and Miss Edna 
Wallace. At the affair the engagements of the guests ..i 
honor were made known. Miss Irene Wallace telling of 
her betrothal to George Beed of Ardmore. Oklahoma : and 
Miss Edna Wallace announcing her engagement to Carl 
R. Austin of Modesto. 

The announcements were made in an attractive manner. 
Each guest chose a corsage from a center basket ol gar- 
denias fashioned of individual nosegays. To these were 
attached silver streamers which extended to the place 
cards and concealed within the dainty floral bouquets were 
the betrothal cards. 

The brides-elect are the daughters of Mr and Mrs. J. F 
Wallace of the college city. 

Miss Edna Wallace was graduated from the Notre Dame 
Academy in Alameda and Miss Irene Wallace from the Uni- 
versity of California, receiving her degree with the class of 122. 

Mr. Beed is the son oi Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Beed and was 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 

7.-." Sutler Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Ues: From $2.50 per day 



a student at the University of Southern. Califor- 
nia. He is now in the oil business in Okla- 
homa. 

Mr. Austin is the son of Mrs. Fanny E. Aus- 
tin and is a graduate of Stanford. His busi- 
ness interests are in Modesto. 

The guests at the announcement tea were : 
Mesdames W. J. Browne, F. E. Austin, Theo- 
dore Dosch, William Walter, Herman Harris ; 
Misses Norma Parker, Dorothy Tripp, Agnes 
Ambrose, Nina McCord, Ted Lorentzen, Anita 
Denham, Theone Browne, Florence Williams, 
Mary F. Connelly, Elinor Jack, Edith Reimer, 
Harriett Rogers, Eileen McCord, Hilda Von 
Soosten, Lavina Raloun, Elizabeth Ouinn, Alice 
de Shamps. 

* * * 

San Francisco Center Gather to 
Honor Noted San Francisco Actress 

Blanche Bates, famous San Francisco actress, 
whose stage successes are part of theatrical his- 
tory, was the honored guest at a luncheon given 
last Tuesday in the Colonial ballroom of the 
St. Francis Hotel, by the San Francisco Center. 
Hundreds of women, from the membership enrollment, and 
many men as their guests gathered at the specially appointed 
tables lo pay homage to the noted star of the stage. It was 
one of those happy occasions where courtesy and charm vie 
for favor with sentiment. For Blanche Rates occupies a place 
in the hearts of San Francisco people transcended by none 
other on the histrionic boards. She began her stage career 
here. and rising to the heights as she has. in her chosen pro- 
fession. Blanche Rates is always a source of pride to her host 
of admirers and every Golden Gate citizen. 

With the scintillating skill in her manner of speech for which 
this glorious actress is known, she spoke to the audience, on in- 
timate themes. She told us of what we enjoyed here in this 
town by way of heritage and she pointed out. most definitely, 
just what we should do to prove our appreciation of that heri- 
tage and just how lax we were, or had been, in recognizing tin- 
wealth of things around us. 

It was a remarkable speech, a justified theme, a far-visimie 1 
plan she defined for concerted action — and whether we act, 
or fail in the doing — it is now most certainly our own respon- 
sibility. The stage and the influences of the stage are so close 
to her heart that it is no wonder Blanche Ka'es waxed glorious- 
ly eloquent in the presentation of her thoughts. Why we 
should support and treasure the drama when it comes to our 
theaters in its best array, was specifically presented by the 
speaker. Applause interrupted the celebrated stage star as 
she grew more and more impressive in her specifications. 

Bill it was of San Francisco, itself, and the beauties of the 
city that the speaker would remind us. Declaring herself an 
avowed devotee of beauty in all its forms, she would have us. 
as citizens, see and value the beauty surrounding us. and in 
that valuation hitch our wagons of high-tempered thoughts to 
a shooting star. At least to "get busy" in the matter of map- 
ping out more of the beauty encompassing our metropolis. 

"It was just like Blanche Rates to come and re-discover the 
Golden (late and the beauties of our town!" said an appreci- 
ative auditor — and he was one of the influential men in the 
world-of-affairs. So it was. just like our own radiant Blanche 
Rates! When she comes again. |>erhaps. we will have done 
(Continued on Page 15) 



SANTA MARIA INN 



L 



Santa Maria, California 

Ob Ik. Cuil HtgowaT HMfw.r Bil**«i $*n Franti.ca and 1 *i 
An Inn »f t n»«u.l EirallMin. 

Tw-m t «rw# far r— tp—mwj «a nw •*** °*V •**'* 



Angvle 



; 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? \ 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- j 

tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- j 

ming pool. Fireproof hotel Write for booklet. T. H. COR. J 

CORAN, Agua Caliente. Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah I 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 15, 1925 



«*sijiy&» 



^9Jjf» 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



"^iJWS* 



-5\J, 



W5* 




FOR the first time in the 4,000 years' his- 
tory of the Masonic Fraternity, the mem- 
bers of the Craft are going to hold a golf 
tournament. And San Francisco has the dis- 
tinction of being the city in which the idea 
was originated and where the tournament 
will be played. 

Although the contest was fostered as a pri- 
vate undertaking by "Jack" Houston, Editor and Publisher 
of "The Masonic World," it has assumed the nature of a 
semi-official affair through the official endorsement and as- 
sistance of Grand Master David J. Reese. 

The idea underlying the tournament was to foster the 
spirit of "brotherly love" among the members of the Fra- 
ternity in the Bay Region. It was in line with the aims and 
objects of the Craft and immediately became popular. En- 
tries have poured into the office of "The Masonic World," 
in the Humboldt Bank Building, almost faster than the 
various committees could record them and arrange starting 
times for all comers. 

The entries piled up so fast that the Board of Park Com- 
missioners of San Francisco were consulted and it was de- 
cided to place the beautiful new municipal links known as 
Harding Park at the disposal of "The Masonic World" for 
this great all-Masonic golf contest. This was done and 
September 22-23-24 set for the tournament. 

The principal trophy, to be won by the player with the 
lowest net score, is a $750 14-k gold cup offered by "The 
Masonic World." In addition there will be some 40 or 50 
other prizes. The tournament will be an 18-hole medal 
play competition under handicap and U. S. G. A. rules. 
Play will begin at 6 a. m. on September 22 and foursomes 
will tee-off every four minutes thereafter. The various en- 
tries will be divided into four classes in accordance with 
their handicap as follows: 

First Class — Those with a handicap of not more than 10; 
Second Class — Those with a handicap of not more than 16; 
Third Class — Those with a handicap of not more than 20: 
Fourth Class — Those with a handicap of 21 and up. 
The tournament should develop some good individual 
matches as Masons from all parts of the San Francisco Bav 
region have entered. Many are known to be good players, 
particularly some of the members of Islam Temple, who are 
regular attendants at the Del Monte tournaments, held 
under the auspices of Islam. But. under the handicaping 
rule, even the "club" player will have a chance to win a 
trophy. The Handicap Committee consists of the golf ex- 
perts from the various daily newspapers on both sides of 
the bay and golf magazines. 

Aside from drawing golf players of note, the coming 
tournament will witness the greatest gathering of promi- 
nent Masons ever seen here outside of a Grand Lodge meet- 
ing. It is the present intention to have the Grand Master 
drive the first ball, and various other Grand Lodge officers 
will likewise try their hand at the ancient and honorable 
game. Hugh McKevitt, Potentate of Islam Temple, who 
has offered a personal trophy, will likewise be one of the 
contestants. Al Bernard, the Commander of California 
Commamlery. K. T„ will be one of the entrants. Represen- 
tatives of all the various concordant orders of Masonry will 
seek to annex some of the many prizes. 

If Old King Solomon, who was reputed to be the wisest 
man who ever lived, despite his 1.000 wives, could come 
back and see the interest his "children" are taking in golf. 



it's probable he would have constructed a golf course rather 
than a temple. 

More credit to Jack Houston and his "Masonic World" 
for giving San Francisco the honor of seeing the first all- 
Masonic golf contest ever held in the world. 

Among donators of trophies and prizes are: 

Masters and Wardens Association ; Mayor James Rolph, 
Jr.; Hugh McKevitt, Illustrious Potentate of Islam Temple; 
Acme Ice Cream Co., Howard Automobile Co., Shreve, 
Treat & Eacret, E. W. Prentice, Phoenix Desk and Chair 
Co., Palace Hotel, H. A. Ballentine, Hanan & Son, Bilsbor- 
ough's Shoe Store, Walter N. Brunt, Chas. W. Goodwin, 
Many E. Speas, Golden Gate Ferry Co., The Green Book of 
Golf, Western Mutual Life Association, B. Pasquale Co., 
Monroe, Lyon & Miller. Belle Monti Country Club, Gus 
Lachman, Lachman Bros, Checker Cab Co., J. A. Baldi, 
Granat Bros., Jewelers ; R. G. Guyett & Co., Boussum, The 
Photographer ; Heinz Bros., Jewelers ; Ellery Arms Co., A. 
G. Spaulding & Bros.. Ira W. Coburn, Albert S. Samuels 
Co., Jewelers: \Ym. Woodfield, Jr., Chas. Traung, Traung 
Label and Lithograph Co., RalphMeLaran, Dr. W. P. Read, 
Carlton N. Davis, Pacific Coast Glass Co., Warren B. Hay- 
ward. Ernest C. Hueter, Karl Eber, Supreme Scribe of 
Sciots, William H. Worden, Jack McGilvray, J. Alvin Bern- 
hard. Frank G. Watson. (The names of' additional con- 
tributors will be announced next month). 

Those desiring to take part in this all-Masonic tourna- 
ment, should fill out the blank printed below and mail to 
"The Masonic World." 1502 Humboldt Bank Building, San 
Francisco. 

ENTRANCE BLANK 
"MASONIC WORLD" GOLF TOURNAMENT 



Eighteen Holes Medal Play. 

Xame 

Address 
Lodge 



September 22, 23, 24 



Club or Association Handicap 

What Club? 

Best Score and What Course? 

How Long Have You Been Plaving Golf? 
Which Day Do You Prefer To Play? 



"Can you imagine anything that you would rather see than 
Mae Murray as 'Eve'" 

"Sure, that is easy— Gilda Grey with a chill."— West Vir- 
ginia Moonshine. 



Friend — Steady ! You barely missed running over that man. 
If he hadn't jumped — 

Lady Driver— Oh. that's all right. It was ray husband, 
anil the doctor said he needed exercise — Answers. ' 



How dare you., with your scandalous past, propose to me? 
It wouldn't take much for me to throw you down stairs and 
turn the dogs on you!" 

" \m I to take that as a refusal, then'" — Szczutek (Lem- 
berg). 



.Aunt — So your sweetheart went away yesterday. Parting 
is very painful, isn't it' 

Niece — I should think so. Every rib in my body aches.— 
Judge. 



August 15, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



&£» 



By Josephine Wilson 




[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

The Velasquez exhibition of paintings at 
the De Young Memorial Museum in Gol- 
den Gate Park lias attracted enormous 
crowds, this past week. 

Curator George Barron, who read a trans- 
lation of an essay on the work of the great 
Spanish artist written by Jose Maria Sala- 
verria, last Thursday, had an audience of 
more than 12,000 people. Among the dis- 
tinouished guests who attended the reading were Monsig- 
nor^Mestres of Monterey, and More de la Tore, the sculp- 
tor whose bas reliefs are an interesting part of the exhibits. 
Tribute to the genius of Moya del Pino was made in glow- 
ing terms by De La Tore, who spoke of his faithful repro- 
ductions of the Velasquez canvases. Specific attention was 
turned to the exactness of the copies even to the shadowy eras- 
ures as shown in "The Spinners" and "The Drunkards." 

The romantic beauty of the prado in Madrid, where the 
works of Velasquez are assembled as part of the national arts 
treasures of the world, was also made the subject of an elo- 
quent address by Curator George Barron. 

* * * 
Furniture Convention 

Hundreds of retail furniture dealers and manufacturers 
from all parts of the West, Hawaii. British Columbia as- 
sembled in San Francisco this past week for the nineteenth 
convention of the furniture dealers. 

The convention was held in San Francisco s million dol- 
lar Furniture Exchange Building. New Montgomery and 
Howard Street, which is said lo be the only building of its 
kind west of Chicago, and rated to be one of the best of its 
kind anywhere in the world. The exchange is devoted ex- 
clusively to the display of household goods and furniture and 
represents hundreds of manufacturers. The building is a 
wholesale establishment and therefore not generally open to 
the public. Harry 1. Moore, founder of market weeks m San 
Francisco is president of the Furniture Exchange. 

United States Senator Samuel Shortridge made the open- 
ing address at the convention held in the Palace Hotel, taking 
as the subject of bis discourse, -The Home as a Factor in the 
Building of a Nation." 

Andrew 1-. Kerr, president of the Furniture Exchange Vs- 
sociation opened the market week program with an address. 
Irving 1. Brown, secretary of the American Homes Bureau 
of Chicago, addressed the convention at the Tuesday luncheon. 
Stressing the "Better Home- Movement." 

Dr rames 1 Gordon, pastor of the First Cong 
Church was the principal speaker at the Wednesday - 
taking for his subject. "The Moral Aspect of the Home, in 
which the eloquent clergyman imparted some new and valuable 
ideas regarding home environment and its influence in the 
rearing and the guiding of the parents as well as the children. 

H Clay Miller, president o\ the San Francisco Cham! 
Commerce, presided over the convention proceedings on 
Thursday, which was especially designated as Cham 
Commerce Day " President Miller pointed out the business 
man's part in the "Better Homes Movement" and quoted sig- 
nificant statistics showing the value ot concerted, as well as 
individual consideration of better homes and the standar ds .lc- 
t Continued on Page 151 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

Mrs. Parker S. Maddux was accorded an ovation last 
Wednesday when she addressed a large gathering of men 
and women in the Italian ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel 
at a luncheon given in the honor of returned delegates to 
the Institute of Pacific Relations held recently in Honolulu. 
Chester Rowell shared honors with Mrs. Maddux at the 
luncheon, given under the auspices of the Republican 
Women's Federation. 

Mrs. Maddux discussed the Institute proceedings, dis- 
closing in her comprehensive address the friendly rela- 
tions that were established between the seven countries rep- 
resented at the Institute. 

"Although no definite promises were made," said Mrs. 
Maddux in her discourse, "there is no doubt but that the 
institute did accomplish its purpose, and that was the 
bringing about of better understanding between the na- 
tions." 

Chester Rowell dwelt at length upon the conditions in 
China and the immigration laws. The noted speaker en- 
compassed the subject with some real information and pre- 
sented frankly and lucidly the topics of oriental interests. 
In speaking of China, Chester Rowell said in part: "Their 
biggest problem is the education of the masses and that 
has been undertaken on a gigantic scale by a young Chinese- 
American. Jimmy Yen, who discovered China's need at 
the time of the war when the army of Chinese coolies be- 
hind the lines could not write home because they did not 
know bow to write. Jimmy Yen now has thousands of 
teachers instructing the Chinese in reading and writing. 
Considering the fact that one-fourth of the world's popula- 
tion lives in China. Jimmy Yen has mapped out a job for 
himself." 

Mrs. Harry StaatS Moore presided at the luncheon. Seated 
at the honor table were Senator Samuel Shortridge. Mrs. 
Tubus Kahn. Miss Margaret Mary Morgan, Mrs. Addie 
Garw 1 Estes, Mrs. W. B. Hamilton. Dr Susan Hamil- 
ton, president of the Business and Professional Women's 
Club; Congressman and Mrs. E. A. Carter and Mrs. Mark 

Requa. 

* * * 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hawkins, at Nine- 
teenth Avenue and Sloat Boulevard, will be opened for the 
reception of visiting women during the Diamond Jubilee on 
Saturday afternoon. September 5th from the hours of 1 to 
lock. 

A \aried program will be presented in the entertainment 
plan consisting of Spanish dances directed by Miss Lenore 
Peters: music and dancing for the guests and card games 
for those who wish to play. There will also be fascinating 
fortune tellers, strolling troubadours with their guitars and 
mandolins. In fact the spacious grounds of the Hawkins 
estate will be literally converted into a fiesta with the Dia- 
mond lubilee colors predominating. 

Mrs. B. F. Stoll will be the chairman of the fiesta with 
a long list of prominent women aiding her in the elaborate 
preparations and plans. Mrs. A. W. Scott and Mrs. N. 
Lawrence Nelson will act as chairmen of the hospitality 
Committee. 

Other committees already specified for participation in 
the fiesta which marks the' successful campaign of bonds 
(Continued on Page 151 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 15, 1975 



50 CENTS PER COPY 
Postage, U. S., 10 Cents. Canada and Foreign, 20 Cents 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Enclosed $ for which please send to my 

address copies of DIAMOND JUBILEE 

EDITION OF SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Name - 

Address 

Also mail copies direct to the following : 

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The 



Diamond Jubilee 

Edition 

of the 

San Francisco 
News Letter 

will be published 

September 5, 1925 

SSH€& 

112 PAGES 

Will Be Devoted to an Historical Review of 
the Story of California. It Will Be Illustrated 
by the Finest Collection of Old Photographs 
in Existence, Depicting Dramatic Incidents 
During the Pony Express and Vigilantes Days, 
Including a Period From 1837 to 1925. 

<-> 
Order copies now! 



50c per copy 

Postage, U. S., 10c 

Postage, Foreign, 20c 



(Our 60lh Anniversary Number, Published in 1916, which con- 
tained a number of engravings that will be re-published in the 
Diamond Jubilee Edition, has had a ready sale at $10.00 per copy 
during the last four years.) 



August 15, 1925 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

LASSEN VOLCANIC NA- 
TIONAL PARK, the volcanic 
crater of which poured forth its lava 
and fire in a spectacular eruption in 
1914, is one of the great attractions of 
California. 

Lassen stands about forty miles east 
of Redding, 10,577 feet above sea level, 
the northern sentinel of the Sacra- 
mento Valley. 

The mountain was named after 
Peter Lassen, a pioneer settler and 
has four peaks, the eruption taking- 
place on the northeast slope of the 
principal rise a short distance from the 
summit. The whole of the lower part 
of the mountain is covered with 
strange phenomena. Steam pours 
forth from fissures in the rocks. Boil- 
ing mud and mineral lakes art to be 
found throughout the reservation. 

Lassen Volcanic National Park in- 
cludes a variety of natural pheno- 
mena surpassed by no other district in 
the world. Chaos Crags lie to the 
north. Broke Off Mountain, 8,600 feet 
high, to the south, and Prospect Peak, 
9,200 feet in elevation, a short distance 
from the main portion of th.3 crater. 
The northern entrance to the moun- 
tain by way of Redding. Red Bluff 
and Viola, brings the motorist into 
the region laid waste by the eruption 
of the mountain some years ago. Here 
are two lakes, Lake Man/anita and 
Lake Reflection, which mirror the 
snow-clad northern slopes of Lassen. 
From the summit of the mountain on 
a clear day may be seen the snow-clad 
peak of Mt. Shasta, sixty-three niiles 
away by air line. 

Lassen is :\ mountain that I- com- 
paratively easy to climb as there are 
good horse trails from Drakesbad to 
the timber line and from this point 
on the tourist may ascend to the sum- 
mit by a fairly easy climb in from one 
and one-halt' to two hours. 

There are scores of lakes within the 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

confines of the reservation, the Devil's 
Kitchen with geysers and boiling mud 
pots and Mineral Springs, the boiling 
lake, lava caves and caverns all sit- 
uated in a forest wilderness of in- 
describable beauty. 

The various routes into this remark- 
able vacation district as prepared by 
the Touring Bureau of the National 
Automobile Club are as follows : 

Redding to Mt. Lassen 
National Park 

Good dirt road to Shingletown and 
Viola. Fair road from this point into 
the devastated area. Also fair road to 
Manzanita Lake and to the base of 
Lassen Peak. 

Red Bluff to 
Lassen National Park 

Fair dirt road to Payne's Creek. First 
9 miles out of Payne's Creek, excellent 
macadam, next 6 miles being surfaced 
with crushed rock, fair condition, 
thence excellent macadam road to 
Morgan Springs. Fair dirt road to 
junction where road turns north to 
Lassen. 

Oroville to Lake Almanor 
and Lassen National Park: 

Paved to Pentz, good dirt road to 
Magalia and Stirling City, fair dirt 
mountain road to Lake Almanor, good 
to Chester. The road to Drakesbad and 
Lassen Park turns north from the 
Chester-Red Bluff road about 6;4 miles 
west of Chester. Fair to good dirt 
road to the park. 

Chico to Lake Almanor 
and Lassen National Park 

Good dirt mountain road to Lake 
Almanor via Butte Meadows and 
Jonesville, fair to Chester and 6^J 
miles west where road branches to 
Lassen National Park. 



The completion of the Incline-Glen- 
brook road on the east side of Lake 
Tahoe will provide a much-needed 

artery of travel between Carson City 
anil Truckee and offer an additional 
scenic route connecting with the pres- 
ent roads that border Lake Tahoe. 

This road, which according to in- 
formation received by the Touring Bu- 
reau of the National Automobile Club 
will be completed by August 15. has 
been built by Washoe County. Nevada, 
and the United States Forest Service 
for tire protection as well as for gen- 
eral travel. 

The road extends from Incline on 
Crystal Bay to the Glenbrook road at 
Spooner, a distance of twelve miles. 
The road is ten feet wide on the side- 
hill sections, twelve feet wide over 
the flats, with a grade not to exceed 
six per cent (6', I and constructs 
that the road it. v be seen for a con- 



13 

siderable distance ahead at all times. 
The lowest elevation is only a few 
feet above the high water level at an 
elevation of 6225 feet. The road as- 
cends to an elevation of 6975 feet at 
the southern terminus. 



~)ach car o/jeroted^SA 
Ay re/iabfe 
c/tauffeurs 
u/ao t/iorou<f/t(y under- 
stand their Aus/ttess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Grnystone 270 

1620 Tine Street 

Snn Francisco 



Attention Club Members! 




Have 
You 
Sampled 
a 
Club 
Business 
Lunch 
at 
SINGLE- 
TON'S 
ALLEY 

CAT 

LUNCH 

INN? 



Delicious, Dainty and Decidedly Different 



CYCOL 



MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 

JhenewHEXEON, 

process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

*• IN FRANCISCO 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



August IS, 1925 




MONEY is a little firmer these clays, though the com- 
mercial demand still remains light. Grain dealers 
are not using much money. The fact is, that this year s 
crop will be almost altogether used by domestic millers 
and foreign buyers are looking for their supplies in other 

markets. 

* * * 

—Stockton factories are turning out harvesters, tractors, 
plows, scrapers, refractories, wooden specialties paints, 
medicines, disinfectants, soaps, radio apparatus, fertilizer, 
canned fruits and vegetables, flour, cereal products, stock 
and poultry feeds, macaroni, creamery products, sole 
leather castings of iron, steel, copper, aluminum and alloy, 
paving machinery, pumps, reclamation machinery, miscel- 
laneous tools, boxboard and wooden containers, leather 
sports wear, and many other articles. This is quite an 
large list for that city. 

* * * 

—The California State Life Insurance Company hasde- 
vised a new form of insurance contract. It is called "In- 
sured Saving Installment Contract," the contract being 
for the purchase of a bond to be paid for in twenty annual 
installments. The insurance clause provides that if death 
occurs at any time after the first deposit has been paid, 
the bond becomes fully paid for and the beneficiary will 
receive either the full amount of the bond or cash, with 

all matured coupons. 

* * * 

—Earthquake insurance aggregating $568,000 has been 
placed on Berkeley school buildings. The fallen building- 
clause has, according to statement of Emslie and Lorenz 
local agents, been eliminated from all fire policies covering 
school property. 

* * * 

— The value of the mine production of gold, silver, cop- 
per, lead and zinc in California in 1924 amounted to $22,- 
973,257, an increase of $1,844,312 over the 1923 figures as 
shown in statistics compiled by James M. Hill of the 
Bureau of Mines, Department of Commerce. The total 
production of these ores in California in 1924 is placed at 
2.019,200 short tons as compared with 1,535,691, short tons 
in the year previous. The total number of producers re- 
porting to the Bureau of Mines for the year 1924 was 533, 
compared with a total of 621 producers reporting in 1923. 

* * * 

— The change of sentiment in business for the last two 
months has been very much marked for the better, and 
there is a distinct recuperation from the pessimistic mood 

of the spring. 

* * * 

— Crops this year, as reviewed by the experts, promise 
to be ample, but not large enough to create great sur- 
pluses. The net result, according to the best informed opin- 
ion, is that the purchasing power of the farmer will be 
back to the pre-war basis. Corn, wheat and oats all tend 
to show higher returns than of late years. 

* * * 

— European conditions still remain quite unfavorable for 
international trade. In Germany, in particular, a strong 
effort is being made to limit imports to the lowest possible 
level. Every device kown to the German economists (than 
whom there are none abler), will be used to make German v 
self-sustaining as regards food and industry. The eight- 
hour day will be ignored by general consent, for the people 
have made up their mind that their only salvation is in hard 
work, 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 479,081.25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7tli Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (434) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. 



San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Dp Capital *20,0u0.000 »20,000,000 Heaerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.: NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND. ORE.: SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San FrnnciNco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA —lit I : I : I 
BRUCE) HEATHCOTE W. J. i III l.'l'll \ II l> 

Manager Aunt, manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS ] 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacture™ of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. FLUMES. 

PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 

Snn FrnnclNCO, Calif. Lou Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Avenne 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



August 15, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from Page 11) 

fined. Other prominent speakers included, Clifford J. Back- 
strand, Pacific Coast representative of the Armstrong Cork 
Company ; Lancaster, Pa, ; H. R. Basford, Furniture Exchange 
director was chairman of the week. 

"Come Out of the Kitchen," one of the most interesting 
talks of the sessions by Backstrand was augmented by ap- 
propriate illustrations and displays on kitchen conveniences 
and helps. 

* * * 

Anniversary Outing 

The seventh anniversary outing held by the Mission 
Street Merchants' Association, August 9 at East Shore 
Park, Stege, Richmond, Contra Costa County, proved one 
of the most enjoyable picnics the Missionites have ever 
had in all the history of their association. 

Gus Lachman, president of the Mission Street Merchants' 
Association, and his efficient committee leaders, were re- 
sponsible for a successful event. Dave Cohen acted as 
chairman of the day and was assisted in the preparations 
for the picnic and the entertainment by J. C. Marshall, 
secretary of .the association, Leon Rewig, L. H. Aubert, 
Louis Scheppler, Jack Ryan, V. H. DeGanna, Arthur Holl and 
Ixrms Pollard. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from Page 11) 

invested in the Women's Building to be erected on Sutter 
Street, include: Mrs. Cecil Moss, program; Mrs. Fred Ben- 
nett and Mrs. Philip Vallejo of the Golden Gate Branch 
of the Sunshine Society, candy ; Miss Alice Lathrop Ken- 
yon, Mrs. Charles Minnick and Mrs. Charles W. Boothman, 
refreshments; Mrs. Charles Hoffman, needlework; Miss 
Doris Newall, souvenirs; Mrs. William Copeland and Mrs. 
John Brichette, white elephants; Mrs. James Wilson El- 
liott and Mrs. William Graham, card tables. 

The event will be one of the outstanding affairs planned 
by the local committees co-operating with the Diamond 
Jubilee committees for the success of the greatest fiesta 
and celebiation which California has ever known. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

some of (he things -be so seriouslj and magnetically defined. 

Mi's. Ufred MacLaughlin, ;\ former president of Hi. 
Francisco Center, presided at this luncheon. Seated with 
her at the honor table were men and women occupying high 

places in the affairs of our commonwealth. 

Mis. J. I. Gottlob presided at one of the table- with notables 
from the theatrical, the musical, the literary ranks, the legal fra- 
ternity and those prominent in the state's achievements. 

Mis. Zilfa Estcourt, executive secretary of the ('enter, 
was a cordial chairman of the reception and hospitality com- 
mittees, welcoming the invited guests and the members at the 
noteworthy event. 

* * * 

Cap and Bells 

Mrs. Marshall Harris, president of Cap and Bells Club, 
will be one of the prominent Club presidents, assisting the 
Pen Women at the Golden Jubilee breakfast to be given on 
Saturday, Uigusl J" in the gold ballroom of the Fairmont 
Hotel. Mrs. X. Laurence Nelson, past-president i^i the Pa- 
cific Coast Women's Press Assi ciation, is announo 

ing the receiving line which will welcome the guests 

Miss Mary Bird Clayes, past pres the Berkeley 

Branch, and vice-president for Northern California. League 
of American Pen Women, will preside at the breakfast. Presi- 
dents from four branches will assist Miss Clayes including: 



Mis. R. K. Lawrence of the newly organized Sacramento 
Branch, Mrs. Eunice Lehmer, President of the Berkeley 
Branch, Mrs. Frederick II. Colburn, president of the San Fran- 
cisco Branch and Mrs. Alita Muggins, newly elected president 
ol the Santa Clara County Branch. Musical program numbers 
include Lydia Warren Lister's opera, "The King of Spades" 
with excerpts sung by Pearl Ladd, operatic prima donna. 



Bo — The shades of night are falling fast. 
Zo — Yes, there's no use in standing here any longer- 
mouth Jack o' Lantern. 



-Dart- 



Bill — I hear that Mary's a Quaker. 

Jack — Well, I'll say she was a pretty good Friend last night. 
— Perm State Froth. 



"What do you wear under these lace dresses? 

"That's a slip." 

Oh, I beg your pardon !" — Columbia Jester. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

Nightly 

Jack Holland and Miss Jean Barry 

in 

REVUE 

A, Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 7 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the* 

VALLFYo/ the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms." 





Clean 


Room*. Clean Linen, 


Clean Evrrvih 


Snnonn 


Count v*i 


Famous Hesorls and 


Mineral lUarr 






Tank. From This 


Hotel. 



Ratet Exri-plioiially KeaionaMe. 

Telephone 110 



FETTERS' HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Mas- 
seur in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming 
pool. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Rates, $18 up. 
Write George Fetters, Mgr., or Peck-Judah. 



MADE TO ORDER ON LY 
* IhosEKeilt Shirts ^JhosHKeof 

^wf ,:=„ <m? 



Pajamas 

Night Robes 

Large Assortment of Imported fabrics 

25 Kf uunr Street Phone Kearny 3714 



i 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. J 
San Francisco. Phone -Market 64 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 15, 1925 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
Telegraph Hill Players 

The selection of a cast for Edmund 
McKenna's play "The Red Knight" is 
proceeding at the studios of the Tele- 
graph Hill Players. Ben Legere, direc- 
tor of the players, last night announced 
that the play would be ready for an 
opening in September, the date de- 
pending i pon whether his entire cast 
can be completed this week. 

Then are ten characters in the Mc- 
Kenna comedy, and the selection of 
players for five of these characters was 
made last night. Carol Clark, Eleanor 
Burbank, Gordon Graves. L. Vaughn 
Funck and Joseph Doyle were selected 
from the group Mr. Legere has been 
trying out in preliminary rehearsals. 

A number of capable players are still 
being considered for some of the re- 
maining five characters, but as Mr. Le- 
gere desires to assemble the very best 
cast available his final decision will not 
be made until an opportunity has been 
given to try out many people in these 
parts. Two of the most important 
characters of the play still remain with 
no candidates in sight and players re- 
siding anywhere in the Bay District 
are urged to communicate with Mr. 
Legere at 1266 Washington Street im- 
mediately as he hopes to be able to 
fill the remaining parts this week. 

A complete alternate cast will also 
be selected and the players comprising 
this cast will not be considered merely 
as understudies, as it is expected "The 
Red Knight" will have a sufficiently 
long run in San Francisco to make it 
possible for all the alternates in a num- 
ber of performances. 

While most of the players selected 
have had considerable professional ex- 
perience, talented amateurs will be 
given every opportunity to join the 
group and have their abilities developed. 



Diamond Jubilee Ball 
Swirling, dancing, laughing throngs 
— dons and donas, senors and senor- 

itas. 

A verdant, floral setting — the green-- 
of the mountains, splashes of vivid red 
and yellow from the plains. 

The lustre of the diamond — great 
flashes of powerful searchlights, the 
glow of sparkling incandescents. 

The lilt of music — "La Paloma." "La 
Golondrina," "Cielite Lindo." 

That will lie the costume ball in the 
Civic Auditorium Saturday night. Sep- 
tember 5, which will mark the official 
opening of California's Diamond Jubi- 
lee. 

Brigadier-General Thornwell Mullal- 
ly, chairman of the costume ball com- 
mittee, announced yesterday that the 
coming event will mark another step 
forward in the development of San 
Francisco pageantry, rival the Ball of 



All Nations, eclipse the Mardi Gras 
and outshine the Auditorium's opening 
ball of hallowed memory. 

An illumined page from the lore of 
California, the costume ball will be 
one of the most colorful events of a col- 
orful week. San Francisco's women 
and girls will vie for honors in vivid 
hues of the Spanish vogue and her 
men will fare forth resplendent in the 
garb of more festive days of Alta Cali- 
fornia. < )r perhaps some granrle dame 
in hoop skirt and pantelette or stalk- 
ing '49er. or even some couple remin- 
iscent of Colonial and Napoleonic days, 
will lend contrast in the kaleidoscopic 
review of the ages. 

The evening's program will open 
with the initial official ceremonies of 
Jubilee Week, to be followed by the 
coronation and acclamation of the 
queen of the Diamond Jubilee. Then 
will follow a grand march and a jour- 
ney down an iridescent trail of color 
and light to the shores of Happyland. 

Mullally announced that only cos- 
tumed men and women or those en 
masque or in uniform will be per- 
mitted on the dancing floor. However, 
uncostumed spectators may view the 
pageant from reserved and unreserved 
seats in the Auditorium balcony. 

Ticket reservations now may be 
made at the costume ball committee's 
office, 450 Phelan Building, or at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. The ticket schedule 
has been announced as follows : Boxes, 
each seating eight persons, $60; re- 
served seats, first five rows of the bal- 
cony. $4 ; general admission, $2.50. 

This ball is expected to attract par- 
ticipants from every part of Califor- 
nia. One city in particular. Holly- 
wood, will be well represented, as ar- 
rangements are being made for the 
bringing of a large number of motion 
picture stars to San Francisco for the 
occasion. 



Singleton's Alley Cat 
< )ne always thinks of an alley cat 
as long, lean, lank, half-starved and 
wholly forlorn looking, but the person 
who becomes a daily habitue of Single- 
ton's Alley Cat in Belden street, grow.-, 
as sleek and well-fed as the proverbial 
well-eared-for house tabby, for Mr. 
Singleton knows I through vears of ex- 
perience as manager of the Claremont 
Country Club,) how to cater to the 
satiated as well as to the eager palate, 
by serving something novel every day 
in the week. Since the inception of his 
cafe, a few months ago, he has created 
150 different entrees, a task that would 
fluster the most efficient and original 
house-wife. 

This quaint place seems to draw the 
cream of the business world. — the "big 
chiefs" (whether of the masculine or 
feminine gender) of insurance, real es- 
tate, importing and exporting and 



other firms of importance in the finan- 
cial world, and numerous parties of 
from three to six people, reserve tables 
every noon as a matter of course. 

Mr. Singleton is a cordial host ; he 
stops for a chat at each table; he is 
vividly interested in his own enter- 
prise, which always goes towards mak- 
ing a success of an undertaking; he 
draws your attention to the numerous 
cats depicted on the walls the work of 
a young stripling, George Post, who 
he says, is going to make his mark in 
the world ; he tells you that his cats 
are a combination of "Crazy Cat" and 
"Felix;" he describes to you the pro- 
cess of making stuffed oysters, a del- 
ei table dish that very few restaurants 
know how to prepare properly, but 
which you may obtain in all its per- 
fection at the Alley Cat; he explains 
the inner workings of his wonderful 
coffee urn, which turns out delicious 
hot coffee and iced water at the same 
time, and which cost the munificent 
sum of S1000, composed of white en- 
amel and German silver, and which 
shines like a mirror, and altogether, he 
leaves you with the impression that 
you have been talking to rather a re- 
markable man. — one who has made a 
deep and earnest study of foods and 
their preparation, who believes that 
edibles should look as good as they 
taste, that they should be served daint- 
ily, and not too fulsomely. and who 
has mastered the art of catering suc- 
cessfully to an exacting and particular 
public along epicurean lino. 



At Paul Elder's 

Lillian Hird, well known as a speak- 
er on modern thought and psychology, 
will continue the weekly Review of 
Current Events formerly conducted liv 
Juliet James. 

Mrs, llird's series of Current Events 
will be given in the Paul F.lder Gallery, 
Friday mornings, at 10:15 o'clock. 
The fall series will be^in Friday, Aug- 
ust 21st. 



So Would We 
"I'd be much better off if they'd 
put that sign on the mail box." 
"What sign?" 
"Post no bills." — Mutual Magazine. 



Wife paying unexpected call at the 
office) — You told me, John Henry, that 
your new typist was an old maid. 

John Henry (flustered) — That's 
right, dear, she's away ill today and 
sent her granddaughter instead. — 

Judge. 

Meanest Man in Town 

Barton — What makes your next 
door neighbor so unpopular? 

Borrows — He has arranged his lawn 
mower so that you have to drop a 
penny in the slot to make it go. — 
Boston Transcript. 



August 15, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Mr. Blabbitt on Gab 



I SEE, by the papers, that there are more automobiles in 
this country than there are telephones. Statistics, with which 
we are always plentifully supplied, purport to prove that there 
are over seventeen million motor cars and coffee-grinders to 
over fifteen million, five hundred thousand telephones. The 
only tiling I can say to this is that all the automobiles are not 
working and the telephones are overtaxed. 

This is really a very remarkable condition, since automo- 
biles must be run by a mixture, known as gasoline, that retails 
for from twenty cents a gallon, up, plus tax. Telephones are 
run on gas, too, and it is surprising to find how much mile- 
age can be procured from ordinary jaws, tongues and at- 
tendant apparatus, over the telephone. 

The telephone company does not attempt to retail or whole- 
sale gab at so much a gallon or yard, but measures long dis- 
tance conversations by the time it takes to get them started, 
under way and completed. Wouldn't it be a great thing if the 
automobile and gasoline companies would do the same thing. 

Gab is a remarkable human product, owing its origin to 
nothing, gathering momentum with use and dying in the thin 
air — harming some, making others mad, flattering many, but, 
mostly, going in one ear and out the other. Old women used 
to be the most proficient in gabbing, but, nowadays, the young 
girls have it all over them, as these dear things know more 
than their elders ever thought of picking up, on the vital sub- 
jects of life — and others not so vital. The same might be 
said of young men, since the young men discuss the young 
men, and the young men talk about the young women and 
older people talk about them all. 

In what business or professions is gabbing most prevalent? 
This is hard to say. Who talks the most, the butcher, the 
baker or the gas man, the ice man, the family lawyer or doc- 
tor, or the cook? I should say. there is little difference. All 
of them talk, if they stand a chance of finding out anything 
or making a little money in indulging in the gentle pastime. 
For instance, while you talk to the gas man. the gas is burn- 
ing; to the ice man, the ice is melting; to the lawyer or doctor, 
they are charging for their time ; and while you are gabbing 
with the cook, she doesn't have to work. 

It all works out, according to the Einstein theory — and some 
have said that there is a little gab mixed up in the latter. The 
relativity between two gabbing person-- docs not have to be 
close. They may be grandfathers, aunts <>r just forty-second 
cousins, and still have a lot to say about Aunt 1 k-ttie. that 
fast Miller girl or how much like his father that tough little 
Johnson boy is. 

Gab is made up of three letters, as you see G stands for 
Gas, A for And. while P. stands for Blah, Gab, as a word, has 
main' synonyms, such as. gush, blabb ( regardless of family 
connections), jabber, jaw and twitter, nag. crow and harp, 
ramble, rant, chatter and babble and. last but not least, to talk 
idly, unnecessarily and thoughtlessly. 

I have often wondered how some people can talk, at the rate 
of five hundred words a minute. Now, I believe. I have the 
answer. Their brains do not function, any more than do those 
of parrots. They simply say what they hear, or describe what 
they dream. 

Gabbing is a dangerous pastime. It may lead to a breach 
of promise suit, a burned roast or a new spouse. In this lat- 
ter hint may be found the cause of the rate with which Amer- 
ica's divorce rate is climbing upward and also for the avidity 
with which supposedly law-abiding citizens hit up on gin and 
corn. 

Come now ! Have / been gabbing? 



THE FRIENDLY ROAD 

(Continued from Page 3) 
European peasant who had lost her way in this quaint Cali- 
fornia village. 

"Just up the road a piece," she answered, resting on the edge 
of her wagon, and mopping her hot face with her apron ; "and 
there's a boarding house over across the street where you can 
all find a night's lodging," she went on, evidently thinking that 
we were on the quest of some place to lay our heads. 

" Where'd you come from ?" 

"Walked from Caliente," said the Flapper, proudly. 

The woman dropped her apron: "Heavenly Days!" she 
exclaimed ; "You poor child !" 

* * * 

The next morning the gray fog lay again like a benediction 
over the hills and silent valley ; but we knew that before noon 
the sun would send golden shafts into the shadowy canyons, 
and that the balance of the dav would be warm and beau- 
tiful. 

I greeted the Flapper and the Woman of the World at 
breakfast with some trepidation; how would they feel? Would 
they protest against ever taking a "hike" with me again ' J . 

They nodded brightly at me from their table near by. 

"Where do we go from here?" asked the Flapper. 

We Have Experts for Handwork, Too i 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 



V<fj< Motor Qils 

Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality— 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 



462 Bryant St., San Francisco 



122 Center St., Los Angeles 




1UO OK IRV ST. ^^ 



I'EI.. PRANK LIN :ui*7. 

Metnl Work Auper- 
l a I n I ii c t<> vutnmo- 
l»ile* — 0*7- Acetylene 
Weld In K — Ii la ek- 



xmllhlnc. 

AUTO IENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE VOIR CARS *7alVBD A M> ■!■■■■■■ 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rate*. 35* per day; »7..V> per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Sis Floora far Service and Storage of A ntomobllea 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 15, 1925 




SUMMONS 

No. 151)71)0 



N. W- CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 
San Francfaco — DurllnBame 

Wot, 793 478 



Phone StJTTER 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street ot Grant Avenue 

Snn Franclnco. Cnllf. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254 -J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Action Brought In the Superior Court of the 
State of California In and for the City and 
County of San Francisco* and the Cam- 
plaint Filed in the Office of the County 
Clerk of Said City nnd County. 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Walter Samuel "Woodward, Plaintiff, vs. 
Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting lo Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an 
action brought against you by the above- 
named Plaintiff in the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer the 
Complaint filed therein within ten days (ex- 
clusive of the day of service) after the ser- 
vice on you of this summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere 
within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
bonds of matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff and defendant, on the ground of de- 
fendant's willful neglect; also for general 
relief, as will more fully appear in the Com- 
plaint on file, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the 
said Plaintiff will take judgment for any 
money or damages demanded In the complaint 
as arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for other relief demanded in the com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the 
Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By W. S. SHAFER, Deputy Clerk. 

Dated July 27. 1925. 

AUSTIN LEWIS. 

473 Mills Building, San Francisco, Calif., 
All"|-lir) f..i- J'lainliff. 

No. 146,330 

SUMMONS 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint 
filed in the office of the County Clerk of said 
City and County. 

Frederick Marriott, Plaintiff, vs. N. F. Wil- 
son, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to: N. F. Wilson, Defendant. 

You are hereby directed to appear and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 
above, brought against you in the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, within 
ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and County; 
or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money 
or damages demanded in the complaint as 
arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for any other relief demanded in the 
complaint 

Given under my hand and seal of the .Su- 
perior Court at the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California. 

Dated April 30, 1924. 

[Seal] H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAGNETTO,. 

Deputy Clerk. 

AUSTIN LEWIS, Attorney for Plaintiff, 473 
MiM> I'.uiMmil;-. San !■' ia m: i s.;;. ». < 'a I i 1 . . rn ia . 



KOTICE TO CIlEDITOnS 



No. 41,989. 



All That Was Lacking 
Maude — Ferdinand has all the qual- 
ities that go to make a good husband 
but one. 

Ella— What is that? 

"He won't propose." — Judge, 1900. 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. 
Dent No. 9, 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
John Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of Pan Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within four (4) 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice to the said administrator, at his office, 
B68 Phelan Building, San Francisco. Cali- 
ornia, which said last-named office the under- 
signed selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of John 
Oliver, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Francisco, California, July 7, 



Dated, 
1925. 



San 




-the bettor itgeb- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cups were served at the Pan- 
ama Pnelflo International Exposition 



*°**** 



PIONEER 



The 
Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther It be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete sat 1 sf ac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
W1ff , printer or sta- 

•l^-U'.'HlHzBjTj^HI ^ u n s e a r m pT e s h ° W 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 





UV CABIN STEAMERS I'KUll 
NEW YORK 

Direct Sailing, via Panama Canal 

THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

570 Market St., San Franei.co 



CULLINAN & HICKEY. 
Attorneys for Administrator. 




WHERE TO DINE 




ICE CREA 

CANDY 
PASTRY 



St 1 



BREAKFAST 

£ CALIFORNIA sixl LUNCHEON 

Cr """>" ..[ DINNER .^ 



W 





K fl^h. Caroline Jones 




«!Uy7^^ Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:M) 


1 


f3/M( \ W*» an d tea from 3 to 5 
I..' Mi V f <U 

CSaL^ 0, 534 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 
and- 



fc)feai\ot\5 



445 Powell St.. 

San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the j 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



! Women's 


Building Sandwich 

212 Ellis 


Shop 


1 Breakfasts 35c-50c 


Lunch 50c Table d'hote 


Dinner 60c 


1 A 


a carte orders at all times 


........ .4 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchant's lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Lnrkln Streets Phone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 
in the finest cafe In America 



Luncheon < 1 1 i30 to 2 p. in. i 

Dinner. Week Days 

Dinner. Sundays and Holidays 



75c 
91. SO 

91.75 



I. 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

D8 Third Avenue. BAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11 :30 a. m. to 2:00 p. in. 

i m, to B:80 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4 SO to 8:30 p. m <>nly 

CI.OSF.D BVER1 HONDA.1 

Half Block front Hlghwaj 




ll-M.ir II,. i -. 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN *K» K. U. TO 11:00 P M 

i \-i RPASSEO il ISINr 

CARI l.fcONHARHT 

formerly of 

Coldrn Gala Park Casino 



CLIFF-HOUSE 



Plate Lunch 


- - 60c 


Plate Dinner - 


60c to 85c 


Sunday Dinner 


- - $1.00 


Phone Pacific 1 23 





A la Carte at popular prices 
Banquet Rooms and Card Rooms 

Rich aid P. Roberts, Proprietor 






FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that n vigorous brushing once or twice a day Is 
luklng very good enrc of them. Brushing Is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth whirl, only a 
competent dentist cau take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles thn* will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sorer Do your gums bleedf Call In today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif 

Phone Garfleld 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Croirnn; Self Cleaning llrlileeai 

Poreelnin u ork nnd Rooflen. Plnten 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare BookB — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions In London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 6816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

«'PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



DR B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 



Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell 

San Francisco 



Hours 9 t„ 4 
Telephone Douglas 2949 



p 


arisian 


Dyein 


£ 


and 


CI 


eanin 


£ 




Suil* IS ill J 


B. Hand 

MME 


Onlr-- 

M. 


-nil 

S. 


T.llrH Fo. 

E. LEE 


and Dr 


tared 








r.Mn 


Pyrtffjr an 


I C leaning 








iS3 
I> 


Po>t Snavji 
l lire 11 1» Hotel 










Phi. 


>»s r«*>L 

E Fra*kli* ! 


.to 
510 
. . ■ . 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes. Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130RussSt. Phone Hemlock 170 San Frannsn. 




There's entertainment for the whole family in The 
San Francisco Chronicle's big Sunday paper! The 
beautiful Rotagravure — the 8 pages of Comics — • 
Fashions — Automobile news — Sports — Music — 
Drama — Screen — Special Articles by noted writers. 

Be sure you see ii every week 



Note: You have till Saturday midnight to send in your 
travel essav in The Chronicle's World Tour Contest. 



g>an iFramwn GHrnmtrl* 



SAVE MONEY! 

Buy Automobile 
Commute Books 



'} 



ROUND TRIP DAILY 

Including Sundays 

$23.45 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 



A. O. Stewart 
President 



Harry E. Sfeas 
VicePres. and Genl. Mgr. 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 



The tenter 
for Thtalret 
<Bank*. Shopt 

'Vie out tit tie 
for 'Booklet 



$ RATES— 'Per 'Day, single. European Wan 

*2. 50 10*400 
3. SO to 5.00 
6.00 10 8.00 



120 rooms wiih running water 
220 rooms with b.ith 
160 rooms with bath 



Double. $4.00 up 

Also a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites, some in period furnishings with grand piano, 
«<. lire place and bath. $10 00 up. 

LARGE AND WELL EQUIPPED SAMPI E ROOMS 



T%A<*{CH0 QOLF CLUB] 
L available to aU guestsJ 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 

<fW<in«Jjc*r 



it 



HOTEL/ 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles 




mi sale daily. Now visit eastern ac- 
quaintances, familiar scenes. Plan 
a vacation trip, benefiting by these 
low roundtrip fares. 

For example — from main line 
points — 
Kansas City, Mo. > 72.00 

Omaha, Neb 72.011 

St. Louis. Mo. B1.S0 

New Orleans, La. 85.15 

Chicago, III. 85.00 

St. Paul, Minn. 87.50 



W ;i-liiiic D. C. 

Philadelphia, P 
Ni« York CitJ 
Boston, M;i>>. 



141.56 

II). 02 
147.40 

153.50 



Proportionately low Fares to 
man] other points. 

Stopover privileges. 

Comfortable, luxarionsl) appointed 
trains. Convenient connections ;ii east- 
ern terminals. 

Fur jtirthrr infitrnmlion 
ask any agent 



4 Routes 

Sunset 

Golden State 

American Canyon 

Shu sin 

Go on one; 

return on another 

if you choose 



Southern Pacific Lines 



I errj Slal ion 



I 



(>."i (>;ir\ Streel Third Si. Sti 

Or Phone SITTER Inno 






PRICE 10 CENTS 



iNCISCO 



ESTABLISHED /ULY 20, 1856 




SATURDAY, AUGUST 22nd, 1925 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



LOS ANGELES 




"She murmurs near the running 
brooks 
A music sweeter than th,ir own. 

- WORDSWORTH. 



F 




'H 




THE 

Diamond Jubilee 

EDITION 

of the 

News Letter 

Will be Issued 

Sept. 5th, 1925 

ORDER COPIES 
NOW 






«_J?ol 




EiUbllthed July 20. 1836 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Fac'fic Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr.. from 1SS4 to 1!*-"-. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Butter B686. Entered at San Francisco, California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: .Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 22, 1925 



No. 8 



Trying to Ttaunt the T^ons 

E. Farrand Ross 

The Dons are dead, but the dare-devil, dauntless, dashing spirit of the Dons is still 
breathing in the lusty bodies of their descendents; the courageous, sun-loving, fun-loving 
spirit of the romantic Spanish-Californians, who believe that to be happy and make others 
happy is a primal duty; that pleasure is a necessity; that repression and oppression are the 
direct causes of criminal inclinations, and that a people, living in a blessed land like ours, 
must occasionally have times of excitement, days of jubilation, celebrations of joy in which 
to express themselves and give vent to the natural happy impulses that generate in healthy 
human bodies, or those impulses, instead of fulfilling their purpose, go astray and become 
demoralized. 

There are a breed of people, who, like the un-lamented Anthony Comstock, believe in 
vetoing everything that in any way caters to the love of beauty and pleasure that God has 
implanted in the human soul; they would pluck all the roses from our lives and leave but 
the thorns; they would institute so many laws and by-laws that we unhappy mortals 
would hardly dare to put one foot in front of the other without apprehension of one or 
all of them; they would make all demonstrations of joy punishable by death; they are the 
Bogies who are, even now, striving to eliminate the sparkling diamonds of joy out of the 
Jubilee by advocating the closing of places of pleasure during the period of festivities. 

These "zealots out of tune with traditions," to quote Mr. James Phelan, these "busy- 
bodies" who are endangering the fun of the fiesta, are almost always strangers within our 
gates; outsiders who have not lived long enough under California's sun to imbibe some of 
its warmth and generosity; who have strayed here from colder and more rock-ribbed lands 
than ours; they are the alien-spirits who would take from San Francisco that which is pri- 
me, ally and should be ever hers — her joy-in-life! 

The Dons are dead, but the dare-devil, dauntless, dashing spirit of the Dons is still 
breathing in the lusty bodies of their descendants! And this spirit will triumph over the 
carping, warped and abnormal spirit of those who are trying to daunt them! 

Viva la Fiesta ! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 22, 1925 




wide support. On the other hand it seems to be un- 
fortunately true that the method of dealing with the ques- 
tion of exclusion has created a deep ill-feeling which it will be 
hard to remove. 



One of the most striking facts in Cali- 
Public Utilities fornia is the immense development of 
Development public utilities finance. Large amounts 

of securities have been issued for the 
purpose of financing the great construction undertakings rend- 
ered necessary by the increased demand for service. 

Applications involving the issue of $197,412,807.29 of secu- 
rities were filed with the commission during the fiscal year 
and of these the commission authorized the issue of $175, 79d,- 
119 and denied that issuance of applications amounting to 
$1,717,865. 

Large as was the amount issued this year, it was, however, 
exceeded by that of last year, when the enormous total of 
$243,869,030 was issued. It is very much larger, however, 
than the amount in 1923. Taking the three years the aver- 
age has been $188,174,965, of which 755 millions were autho- 
rized to be issued for construction work. What this has 
mean for the community is not very hard to understand. It 
has provided living for thousands of men and has furnished 
a market for materials, without which there would have been 
no such prosperity in the state as we have been enjoying and 
are now having. 

In the last twelve years the total of the securities passed 
upon by the commission aggregates very nearly two billion dol- 
lars, the vast bulk of this has certainly gone into construc- 
tion and the actual building up of wealth in the state by the 
addition of great plants and the accessories of a developed 
industrialism. This is power, in the most real and practical 
sense. 

The public utilities corporations, by the development of 
the resources of the community, by the addition of the great 
wealth appearing in their plants, and by rendering more ac- 
cessible the fundamental necessities of light, heat, water, and 
transportation, are our great benefactors. 

The law, which so bluntly restric - 
The Japanese Question ed Japanese immigration and which 
offended the susceptibilities of the 
Japanese people, in what we have always considered to be a 
very unnecessary fashion, is beginning to have actual effects 
upon our Eas'.ern policy. It is likely to place us at a con- 
siderable disadvantage. 

The Eastern policy is very essential to the business inter- 
ests of this country. We have taken the stand that the open 
door is the best and most effective way of dealing with the 
Chinese question from the point of view of our relations with 
that country. We have no possessions there, and our treat- 
ment of China has always been above-board and kindly. 

Other nations which have interests there, and have estab- 
lished themselves over portions of the Chinese territory, are in 
favor of maintaining the extra-territoriality privileges which 
they possess and which are undoubtedly a matter of griev- 
ance to the Chinese. In our fight for extro-territoriality, 
we need the help of the Japanese who, for business reasons 
alone, would be under ordinary circumstances inclined to 
support us. 

Now, however, that co-operation on the part of the Jap- 
anese is lacking. Professor Blakeslee, who is one of the 
best authorities, says that the unwillingness of the Jap- 
anese to combine with us in maintaining the policy of the 
open door and the integrity of China, will have serious and 
far reaching results. 

He puts that unwillingness down to the immigration law 
and recommends its repeal. That is more easy to say than 
to do, for there is no doubt that the exclusion policy has 



We have the reputation of 
A Tribute to Real Worth being devoted to the pursuit of 

material ends to the exclusion 
of higher and greater things. Sometimes the accusation 
would seem to be undeniable; for there is no doubt that 
material ends do play a very important and sometimes dom- 
inating part in our life as a people. Beneath this worship 
of success lies, however, very sincere and real admiration 
for ethical and spiritual things. 

As proof of this we need only point to the widespread 
and very earnest feeling of grief with which the death of 
Major Sidney Peixotto was greeted in this community. 

Here was a man who had followed none of the roads to 
wealth and fame which are the recognized paths of glory. 
He had devoted himself from early young manhood to 
the care and salvation of young boys, sons of poverty. 

Possessed of that innate love which has been the inspira- 
tion of the greatest and the best ; the sort of love which 
impelled St. Francis of Assisi, and hundreds of other saints 
and martyrs, he worked with the boy.- of this community 
and awoke in them love of well-doing and devotion to their 
country. 

Throughout this land and in other lands are thousands 
of men who remember Sidney Peixotto as the inspiration 
of the best in them and the sweetest influence in their lives. 

Compared with such a work as this, the accumulation of 
wealth and the domination of worldly goods, are very in- 
ferior things, even as means of power. For the influences 
which Sidney Peixotto set moving are all the stronger and 
the more permanent in that they are intangible. 

It was the almost unconscious recognition of this that 
caused the spontaneous outflow of love and sympathy with 
which his death was greeted. 



The celebration of our seventy- 

The Diamond Jubilee fifth birthday as a state has taken 

hold of the imagination of our 

people and there is little doubt that this public festivity 

will be epochal in our history. 

Not that we are without very fine celebrations, upon 
which those of us who have passed the boundaries of youth, 
look back with joy and satisfaction. Who can forget the 
Portola Celebration with the wonderful Don Corruvias as 
Don Gaspar De Portola, and the never-to-be-forgotten 
beauty of Miss Virgilia Bogue as she rode up Market Street 
amid salvos of applause? We tell our children about the 
foreign soldiers and sailors, the British Marines with their 
red coats, the French sailors with the red tuft on their 
caps, and, more unusual to us, the Italian sailors from the 
warships, all marching through our new town, with the 
relics of our disaster still at the street corners. 

So, as this generation has lovely memories of past fiestas, 
our children will pass on to theirs the story of the wonder 
of our Diamond Jubilee. These things do stay in the mind. 
Lots of elderly people remember the celebration of the 
Jubilee of Queen Victoria, with the grey warships and the 
hills covered with shouting people, beacons blazing on the 
heights, and an old lady, silent and dignified in the bows <<i 
her yacht, watching the massed power of her empire, and 
weeping with joy for the love of her people. 

From this Jubilee celebration we shall rise, refreshed and 
more confident. We shall be surer of ourselves, and proud- 
er of our history. We shall have a greater respect for the 
people of the Spanish race who played so dignified and 
noble a part in the history of the State. 

It is on the whole quite impossible to thoroughly esti- 
mate the spiritual values of a celebration such as this, quite 
apart from the material values which arc tremendous. 



August 22, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



There has been constant talks between 
The Security Pact the French and British ever since the 
so-called "security pact" was men- 
tioned. M. Briand and Austin Chamberlain have daj and 
night labored to render possible that which in the very nature of 
things seems to be impossible; namely, such an agreement 
between the great powers as shall in the course of time 
render war a practical impossibility. 

Germany sent a communication on the security pact. 
This communication these allies feel bound to answer, and 
they must agree upon their answer. The first question to 
be met is, as to what constitutes such a case of aggression 
by Germany as would give France the right to intervene 
under the proposed guarantees. It would be interesting to 
know how they settle that, for if England retains the right 
to decide for herself, upon its merits, every so-called case 
of aggression , there would not be much chance of sudden 
support of any action that France might take. France 
would like to take sudden action. When she dumped her 
Senegalese upon the German border, some of us who have 
a certain degree of respect for European traditions and for 
culture in general, were a little shocked. We really do not 
know what action, she might contemplate in the event of 
what might appeal to her at the moment as aggression. 
But we may rest assured that Manchester and Birmingham 
will want to know about that aggression, before they again 
spend the lives of their people and lose their position in the 
world of industry. 

Of course, Britain would go a long way to secure the 
presence of Germany in the League of Nations, where she 
would no doubt operate on the side of the British, if the 
German newspaper statements are any index. In addition, 
Germany in the League would greatly offset the present 
growing strength of Russia. 

Just about a generation ago, there 
Mature Imperialism came in the new concept of imperial- 
ism. Its exponents were Cecil Rhodes 
on the practical side, and Kipling on the poetical and im- 
aginative. To the former the development of imperial 
colonies was a practical necessity for a country like Brit- 
ain. In 189S he said: "Here is my solution for the social 
problem. If we are to save the forty million inhabitants of 
the United Kingdom from a murderous civil war, we. the 
colonists, must secure new territories to be occupied by 
the growing population, where we can find our markets 
tor the goods manufactured in our mills and factories. It 
is all a question of food supply. If you do not want a 
civil war you must be imperialists." 

Time has proved the fallacy of most of the above. The 
imperialistic idea has had its way. It brought about the 
Boer War, our occupation of the Phillipines, and in due 
course of time the Great War, which was not unremotely 
connected with imperialistic ambitions. The people in in- 
dustrial countries, like Britain, are no more secure against 
poverty. The solution of the problems of poverty and over- 
population by emigration has been proven to be a vain im- 
agining. Emigration does not diminish population, as 
Italy knows to her sorrow. 

Now there arise on the fringe of these imperial ventures 
menaces of trouble and threats of wars. Britain always is 
on the edge of conflict in Egypt and India to which may 
now be added China. France, struggling with the Riffs, 
has to meet a revolt of Syrians. The whole imperial edi- 
fice shakes ami rattles. France cannot spare white troop- 
to fight colored people; her white people are too few and 
too precious. How long can she rely on the fidelity of 
colored mercenaries ? 



"\\ here the child doth well, let the master praise him, and 
sax. here ye do well. For I assure you. there is no such 
whetstone to sharpen a good wit and encourage a will to 
learning, as is praise." — Roger Ascham, 1515-1568. 



Diamond Jubilee Program 

ANGELO J. ROSSI, chairman of the citizens' execu- 
tive committee announces the following plans in con- 
nection with the Diamond Jubilee celebration. 

The committee are co-operating, as far as possible with 
the California State Fair where September 5 will be "San 
Francisco Day," and it is hoped that as many as possible 
will go from here for that occasion. 

San Francisco's real celebration starts on the evening of 
September 5, and will be ushered in by a grand ball at the 
Civic Auditorium. It is said that this ball will surpass the 
pre-Exposition Ball of All Nations which took place in 
1915. 

The plan, as outlined by Brigadier-General Thornwell 
Mulally, who is directing the arrangements, is to decorate 
the Auditorium as it has never been decorated before, — the 
expenditure for this amounting to about $10,000. A limited 
number of boxes will be sold for $60.00 each, the first five 
rows in the balcony are selling at $4.00 each, and general 
admission will be $2.50 each person. Tickets will be on 
sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., and also at committee head- 
quarters, room 445 Phelan Building. It will be wise to 
make all reservations early. 

Under the direction of Paul Verdier, there will be a 
fashion show on Sunday, September 6, which will be one 
of the best fashion shows ever held in this country. Mr. 
Verdier went to Paris to get the very latest gowns, so that 
San Francisco at this particular time will lead the world 
as far as the show of fashions is concerned. 

Mr. Verdier has also secured Loie Fuller ; dancer of in- 
ternational fame and beloved by San Francisco, who will 
come from Paris with 100 of her dancing girls to appear 
at this fashion show. She will produce her latest creation, 
"On the Mighty Sea Waves" which was the opening number 
at the Paris Exposition this year. 

Monday, September 7, Labor Day, there will be a Labor 
Day Parade for which the various labor organizations and 
building trades are making elaborate preparations. 

Tuesday, September S will be the army and navy parade, 
consisting of United States soldiers, sailors and marines, 
together with a representation of the foreign warships 
which will be here during that week, likewise other semi- 
military organizations. 

Wednesday, September 9, will be the big day, with a 
parade under the auspices of the Native Sons and Daugh- 
ters of the Golden West. There will be elaborate floats de- 
picting the history of the State for the past seventy-five to 
one hundred years. This parade will go clown in the his- 
tory of San Francisco as the greatest parade ever held here, 
and one that every California!) will look to with pride. 

Aquatic sports, yacht races and swimming races have all 
been arranged for. 

September 12. the closing day, there will be a night 
parade for all civic and fraternal organizations. From the 
requests received, this will be the largest parade of all. It 
is indeed gratifying t . > see the interest that has been dis- 
played. 

\\ '. D'Arcy Ryan has conceived an elaborate plan for 
the decorations. There will be several permanent lighting 
features around the City Hall and in the Civic center to 
cost $20,000.00. There will be wonderful fireworks on sev- 
eral evenings. Many other events will take place. The 
Native Sons and Daughters will keep open house through- 
out the week. 

Documents, including a Masonic diploma from Washing- 
ton Lodge Xo. Jo, making Jonathan Cowdery a Master 
Mason, and two commissions engraved on sheepskin parch- 
ments, the first signed by President John Adams, and the 
second by President Thomas Jefferson, making Cowdery a 
surgeon's mate and a full surgeon in the United States 
Navy, have been found in a steei case hidden in an old brick- 
wall of a house under repairs at Norfolk, Va. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 22, 1925 





PLMSURE'SWW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moone- 



Alcazar 

HENRY DUFFY'S lavishly staged 
production, "Little Old New 
York" opened last Sunday evening at 
the Alcazar, with a large and capable 
cast. 

Dale 'Winter scores a veritable tri- 
umph in the role of Patricia O'Day, 
and from the first moment when she 
appears, looking adorable in boys' 
clothes and a blonde wig, until the last 
act, when she appears in her rightful 
person — a girl — in a dress, which is so 
dainty and beautiful and sets off Miss 
Winter's charms so bewitchingly as to 
make all the feminine members of the 
audience gasp with joy at its sheer 
loveliness, her performance is a thing 
of finish and beauty. 

The cast is rich in fine character 
men, notably Fredrik Vogeding. re- 
cently a member of Lenore Ulric's 
company. He portrays in a fine and 
finished manner John Jacob Astor, 
Frank Darien as Bunny Waters the 
watchman, gives as always, a most ex- 
cellent performance, James Donlan's 
Reilly stands out ; Hal Davis as 
Michael O'Day, and Charles Gregg as 
"Bully Boy" Brewster are other out- 
standing members of the cast. 

Henry Duffy himself portrays the 
part of Larry Delevan, and gets out 
of it all that can be expected, but it 
is not the sort of a role that "Terry" 
can do himself justice in. 

Alice Buchanan, as the sophisticated 
and very much affected Ariana, acquits 
herself admirably, and Laura Straub as 
Betty Schuyler is very good. 

The sets are beautiful, as always, and 
the costuming most picturesque. Doro- 
thy La Mar gives us an entirely new 
characterization in the part of the sis- 
ter of "Bully Boy," and the others in 
the cast are well placed. 



President 

Tomorrow marks the start of the 
eleventh week of "The Best People" 
at Henry Duffy's beautiful theater on 
McAllister Street, The President. One 
night this week marked the hundredth 
performance of this laugh-provoking 
play, thus eclipsing the record held by 
Henry Duffy's record at the Alcazar of 
a ten weeks' run at this theater with 
"So This is London." In the ten 
months this popular actor-producer has 



By Katherine Schwartz 

been in the city, he has been singular- 
ly successful, but no one would have 
predicted that his longest run would 
be made at the President. 

"The Best People" is crowded with 
amusing episodes, and the burden of 
the comedy falls upon the shoulders of 
Marion Lord who yets many laughs 
from the situations. Norman Hackett 
is delightful as the father, and Ear] Lee 
is making a name for himself in the 
role of the uncle. David Herblin gives 
a fine portrayal of the chaffeur, ami the 
daughter is well done by Eveta Nud- 
sen. 

( ithers in the cast are Florence Rob- 
erts, William Macauley, Richard Ehl- 
ers, Marion Sterley, ( Hive Cooper, John 
Mackenzie and Eugene Baranowski. 




California 

"Dangerous Innocence" featuring 
Eugene O'Brien and Laura La Plante 
will be the feature at the California this 
week. Mux Dolin has a special con- 
cert feature, and then is a comedy and 
news reel. 



Curran 

"No, No, Nanette" continues to draw 
crowds at the Curran Theater where 
Taylor I lolmes and dainty little Nancy 
Welford delight with their comedy, 
-on- and dance numbers. 

The chorus too. come in for their 
-hare of the hearty applause, for it is 
a chorus of youth and beauty, and their 
costumes, especially the colorful bath- 
ing shawls and suits in the opening of 
the second act. are a riot of color and 
dazzling loveliness. 

There is a large cast in support of the 
stars, and all add to the enjoyment of 

this sparkling musical show. 



Wilkes 

"White Cargo" and the new com- 
pany brought up from Los \ngclcs, 
continue to attract the playgoers of San 
Francisco. This dynamic play of 
South Africa has been the cause of 
much comment and discussion. It will 
be here for only a limited engagement, 
owing to other bookings. 



Granada 

Next week's screen feature at this 
house will be "The Limited Mail" a 
sensational story of the railroad with 



Monte Blue, Vera Reynolds and Wil- 
lard Louis. Al St. John in "The Iron 

Mule" will be part of the program. 



Theater Arts Club 

Last evening the Theater Arts Club 
gave their sixteenth monthly perform- 
ance of one act plays at the Players 
Guild Theater . 

The plays were staged under the per- 
sonal direction of ' Talma-Zetta Wil- 
bur. The program included the fol- 
lowing: "The Forfeit" by T. B. 
1 i rs : "Caleb Stone's Death Watch ;" 
a comedy drama by Martin Flavin ; 
and Booth Tarkington's satirical bit, 
"The Trystine Place." 



Cameo 

This week's bill at the Cameo theater 
is Harry Carey in "The Texas Trail." 
The California Trio, young women 
with very good voices, are contributing 
a program of delightful songs, and 
Wing Kwong Tae. Chinese baritone, 
is also very pleasing. There are the 
usual short reels as well as the Inter- 
national News Reel. 



Pacific Radio Exposition 

Tonight, at the Civic Auditorium the 
West's greatest radio show, — the Pa- 
cific Kadi.. Exposition will open to the 
public. 

This show, the most pretentious yet 
attempted in the country, will portray 

all the latest improvements of the radio 
scientists. The Auditorium has been 
transformed into a veritable scientific 
fairyland replete with magic features 
aimed to captivate the spectator-. 

For the first time there will be as- 
sembled in one San Francisco pavilion 
all the marvels of this marvelous 
science. Among the exhibits will be 
practically every national manufactur- 
er of radio receiving sets. All types 
of loud speakers, storage batteries and 
other accessories will lie shown in a 
setting of old California Spanish archi- 
tecture. This Radio Exposition will 
embody many innovations in radio 
construction which will be demon- 
strated for the first time. 

Elaborate plans have been made for 
the entertainment of the 100,000 people 
expected to attend the show. The en- 
tire program to take place tonight from 
the broadcast studio which has been 



August 22, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

VK\T MI-IK 



ALEXANDRIA ] 

„ > Pictures 

Genry nntl isih 1 


ALCAZAR } Henry Duffy Players 
O'FarrcIl nr. Powell ) "Little Old New York" 


CALIFORNIA } "Dangerous 
4th and Market | Innocence" 


CAMEO I Harry Carey 
KM Market St. J "The Texas Trail" 


CAPITOL ) 

Market and Bill. \ Carter, The Magician 


CASINO 1 

Mason and Ellis f Pictures 


CASTRO | 

420 Castro St. J Pictures 


COLISEUM | 

Clement and 0th \ Pictures 


CURRAN ) 

,. ., f "No, No, Nanette" 

Geary nr. nlnson I 


EGYPTIAN ( Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE ) 

_ _ . , _, , > Vaudeville 

G. G. Ave. and Taylor j 


HAIGHT 1 

» . i j. * *- i r Pictures 
Iln iiilil at Cole ) 


IMPERIAL | Douglas Fairbanks 
1077 Market St. j "Don Q, Son of Zorro" 


LOEWS WARFIELD } "Her Sister From 
088 Market St. ( Paris" 


MAJESTIC | 

Mission between , Pictures 

20th and 21st ) 


METROPOLITAN 1 

2055 Union St. J Pictures 



erected on the main stage of the audi- 
torium, will be carried through the air 
to hundreds of thousands of persons 
throughout the country. 



NEW FILLMORE 
1320 Fillmore 

NEW MISSION 
■j."M Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM 

O'Farrell and Pmvel 


1 
\ 


Vaudeville 


PANTAGES 

Market at Mason 


s 


Vaudeville 


POMPEII | 
Next door to Granada\ 


Pictures 


PORTOLA 
770 Market 


s 


Pictures 


PRESIDENT 
Market A McAllister 


\ 
f 


'The Best People" 


ROYAL 
1SSS Polk st. 


J 


Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS 
MS Market 


( 

1 


"The Iron Horse" 


SUTTER 

Sutler and Stelner 


1 
( 


Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 
O'Farrell ur. Powell 


I 

1 


Pictures 


WILKES 

Geary and Mason 


\ 
\ 


"White Cargo" 


WIGWAM 

Mission and 22d 


\ 

1 


Pictures 



Imperial 

"Don Q, Son of Zorro," Douglas 
Fairbanks' last picture, is still being 
shown at the Imperial. It furnishes 
much entertainment, and offers Fair- 
banks excellent opportunity for his ac- 
robatic talents. 



St. Francis 

At last San Francisco is to have a 
chance to see "The Iron Horse" the pic- 
ture epic showing the building- of the 
Union Pacific Railroad. This film ran 
a year in New Yo*-k, and almost as long 
in Hollywood. This picture opens at 
the new theater, the St. Francis, today. 

Madge Bellamy is the leading wo- 
man, and J. Farrell McDonald is prom- 
inently cast. There is a long cast in 
support. 



Capitol 

For a limited engagement at which 
popular prices will prevail, Carter the 
Great, the magician, will be seen at the 
Capitol Theater beginning Sunday ev- 
ening, August 23. 

Among the Other features on his pro- 
gram is "Cutting n live woman in half," 
and man}' other illusions. 



Warfield 

Constance Talmadge plays her mos1 

unique role in "Her Sister front Paris," 
the new Joseph M. Schenck production 
which opens at the Warfield today. 
For the first time in her life she acts 
the part of her own sister! 

In this play. Conny enacts a dual 
role. Weeks of study preceded the be- 
ginning of actual production, for it 
was necessary to evolve a disguise For 
her which would completely transform 
her. Particular care was taken of her 
gowns. In the early part of the pic- 
-lie is a meek little person, in 
housewifely garb, and then suddenly 
changes into a bizarre young dancer. 

Hans Kraly wrote the original store, 
ami Constance is supported by Ronald 
Coleman, George K. Arthur. Gertrude 
Claire and others. 

Music lovers of San Francisco have 
Fanchon and Marco to thank for the 
opportunity of hearing Lucie Weston, 
late star of the Chicago Civic ( ipera 
Company, starting today. She will be 
seen in connection with an "Idea" en- 
titled "The Screenland Beauties of 
1925." Mere is yi ur chance to sec the 
real beauties of Hollywood. 

Lipschultz and his Music Masters 
will entertain with a fine concert num- 
ber. 

(Continued on Page 16 1 



Coming Events 

The following fairs, shows, exhibitions 
.in I celebrations will he hel 1 at Doints lo- 
cated on or near SOUTPIERN PACIFIC 
LINES in the next few months : Sept. 
22-26, Orange County, Fair, Santa 
Ana; Sept. 22-26, Los Angeles County 
Fair, Pomona; Sept. 24-27. Lake County 
Fair, Upper Lake; Sept. 26-Oct. 3, San 
Diego County Fair, San Diego; Sept. 
27-Oct. 3, Cotton Harvest Festival, Con- 
coran; Sept. 28-Oct. 3, Fresno District 
Fair, Fresno ; Sept 29, Oct. 3, Southern 
California Fair, Riverside; Sept. 29-Oct. 
4, Tehama County Fair, Red Bluff; Oc- 
tober, Carnival of States, Long Beach; 
Oct. 1-7, Utah State Fair, Salt Lake 
City; Oct. 3, Riverside County Fair, 
Riverside; Oct. 6-10, Kern County 
Fair, Bakersfield; Oct. 14-16, Dia- 
mond Jubilee Celebration, Visalia, Calif. ; 
Oct. 15-17, Poultry and Dog Show, Vi- 
salia; Oct. 17-31. California Industries 
Exposition, San Francisco; Nov. 7-8, 
Tahquitz, Palm Springs; Nov. 9-14, 
Arizona State Fair, Phoenix, Ariz.; 
Nov. 14-21, Pacific Slope Dairy Show, 
Oakland, Calif.; Nov. 21, Dairy Festi- 
val. Oxnard'; Nov. 24-28, Californians 
< "range and ( tlive Exposition, Oro- 
ville; Nov. 26, Annual Poinsettia Fes- 
tival. Ventura; Dec. 2-6, Imperial Val- 
ley Fair. Brawley; Dec. 8-13, Winter 
Poultry Show, Los Angeles; Dec. 24- 
Jan, 1, Mardi Gras, Venice. 



At Paul Elder's 
Mrs. E. A. Holmes, a prominent au- 
thority on Parliamentary Procedure, 
now visiting San Francisco from the 
East, will -peak in the Paul Elder Gal- 
lery Tuesday afternoon. August 25th, 
at 2:50 o'clock, on "Parliametry Pro- 
cedure. Its Value to ( frganizations 

and Simple Methods for the Individ- 
ual." There will be no admission 

ch. 'ii , 

.Mrs. Holmes is also to broadcast a 
-cries of short talks over the KG< ' 0J! 
the same subject Monday evening, Au- 
gust 17th and 24th, and Friday after- 
Vugust 21-t. 



Some Nerve 
A hardened motorist ran down a 

i rian. 
"Hey." he shouted, "while you're 
under there, take a look at my brake 
rods." — The Luptonite. 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the r.ilite of the Berkeley Hllla 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
tt a beautiful twenty -eight -acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 22, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



No Grouches Wanted 

GROUCHES are not fashionable. 
They are a detriment to beauty, for one thing. Besides 
who wants to be grouchy when there is so much sunshine 
everywhere? 

Every one is happy in California and it is not the "glad 
stuff" either. It is just down-right happiness. 

Debutantes and sub-debutantes love to laugh and one 
cannot laugh long and keep a grouch. Some one long ago 
tried preachments about being happy and many shrugged 
their shoulders. No one really wants to be told to be happy 
— it just spoils everything! But, being happy because one 
can't help it ; and being happy because it is becoming — ah, 
that's another matter, entirely. 

If it ever was fashionable to snarl and snap — things have 
changed. For snarls and snaps, twin sisters of the wrinkle- 
making grouch, have been banished as useless articles and 
parked somewhere in the forgotten land of Discard. 

With the smiles develop the dimples, and what is so 
rare as a dimple, when it is played properly? So, that, 
perhaps, is the real secret why grouches are not fash- 
ionable! 

* * * 

Treasure Hunt Still On 

Another amusing treasure hunt was played recently at 
Palo Alto at the home of Miss Geneve White. 

The chase for the treasure led from the White home to the 
Menlo Country Club, from there to the Stanford campus, and 
then to the little cemetery at Atherton. 

From the cemetery the trail was followed to a peninsula 
home, with a merry dash over fields and high fences to an old 
oak tree, where a skull and cross-bones indicated the hiding 
place of the treasure. It was one of the most original treas- 
ure hunts of the present season. Dancing at the beautiful 
home of Miss White completed a memorable evening. 

Comtesse de Pins on Visit 

Mr. and Mrs. Georges de Latour and their daughter, the 
Comtesse de Pins, arrived in San Francisco yesterday and 
went at once to the de Latour ranch on the Russian River. 
Later in the season the de Latours and the Comtesse will re- 
turn to town. The marriage of Miss Helen de Latour and 
the Comte de Pins was one of the brilliant events of last year; 
this will be the first opportunity that the Comtesse's friends 
in San Francisco have had to welcome her since that event. 
She will unquestionably be much entertained here before her 
return to her new home in Paris later in the year. 

* * * 
Count to Wed Widow 

Word received in Burlingame from Paris revealed the name 
of the fiance of Mrs. Elizabeth Godey Kohl as the Count Lam- 
bertye, one of the leading sportsmen and clubmen of Paris. 

Mrs. Kohl, who is the widow of the late C. Frederick Kohl 
of San Francisco, announced the fact that she was engaged 
about two weeks ago, but not until letters arrived from Paris 
were her Burlingame friends sure of who the fiance was, 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

n.%0 Itnsh Street. Between Powell and Stoekton. Sun FrnneUrn 

Telephone Sutter 3660 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



though the Count Lambertvc's attention to the attractive young 

woman have been marked for some time. 

* * * 

Bridge Tea 

Mrs. John H. Dayton was recently hostess at a delightful 
bridge tea given in honor of her three sisters, Mrs. Charles 
Parrish, Mrs. Duncan M. Wood and Miss Esther Read. The 
large reception rooms of Rear Admiral and Mrs. Dayton's 
quarters, in which ten tables of bridge were in progress, were 
prettily decorated with baskets of pink lilies and delphinium. 

At the conclusion of the bridge game, additional guests, in- 
cluding officers attached to the navy yard and visiting ships, 

called to meet the guests of honor. 

* * * 

Eneagement Announced 

The engagement of Miss Helen Duprey of I'.erkeley to Orin 
Miles Bullock, Jr., was announced at a bridge tea given a 
few days ago at the Fairmont by Mrs. Eleanor B. Patterson. 

Miss Duprey is the daughter of Arthur Duprey; during 
her college years at the University of California she was fea- 
ture editor of the "Daily Californian" and the member of 
several college honor societies. Bullock is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. O. M. Bullock and is also a California graduate 
where he won a Harvard scholarship for next year. The 
young couple plan to be married next summer. 

* * * 

Distinguished Californians 

Eighteen of America's most eminent surgeons, members of 
the American Society of Clinical Surgery, which admits only 
forty members, were guests of American surgeons in Paris 
at a dinner aboard the British peniche restaurant at the Inter- 
national F.xposition of Decorative Arts recently. The sur- 
geons arc just completing their third visit to foreign hospitals 
and clinics and have visited Milan. Florence, Rome, Venice, 
Bologna, Geneva. Innsbruck and, after a week in Paris, have 
gone to Holland and Belgium. The party includes Dr. Emmet 
Rixford, professor of surgery at Leland Stanford Univer- 
sity. * * * 

Mrs. Warren Shannon and Miss Hetty Shannon of San 
Francisco have arrived in Paris and taken an apartment at 
the I totel d'lena. where they will be for the remainder of 
this year. 

* * * 

Mrs. Joseph Redding of San Francisco has arrived in Paris 
from I.c Touquet. France, and is stopping at the Hotel de 
i Irillon. Mrs. Redding was a recent visitor to Carlsbad. Czecho- 
slovakia. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Holden R. Warner of San Francisco, and 
Miss Alice Delano of New York, have returned to the Hotel 
Regina in Faris from a trip through Italy, Switzerland and 
( lermany. Mr. and Mrs. George Morton of San Francisco 
were at the Regina before sailing for America on August 4. 

* * * 

Mrs. Ernest J. Molt, recently announced as succeeding Mrs. 
W, A. Shockley of Reno, as seventh regional director for the 



| HOTEL 


DEL 


MONTE 


Make Your Reservations at C 
401 Crocker Bui 


ty Booking Office 
ding 


J Telephone Sutter 6130 
»- - - -. ■-■■■■■■■■--- 


Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 
- ■-- -■* 



August 22, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



mkJB 






National League of Women Voters will go to 
Chicago September 7 to attend the league con- 
ference. Mrs. Mott will represent Arizona. Cali- 
fornia, Idaho, Nevada, ( )regon, Utah and Wash- 
ington at the conference 

* * * 

Lad) Agnes Adams, wife of Sir John Adams 
of London, was the honor guest at a luncheon 
given in Berkeley last week hy Miss Mary Bird 
Clayes. The guests included a group of women 
known for their musical, literary and club 
achievements. 

Lady Adams herself is a member of the larg- 
est literary organization of writers in London, 
the London Lyceum. Her writings usually ap- 
pear under the signature, "A. A. A." 

The gold ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel pre- 
sented a fascinating scene Saturday evening in 
its vivid festal garb of the coming Diamond 
Jubilee, the occasion being the annual dinner 
dance of the Acacia assembly. 

An elevated setting occupied the center of the 
room, from which a string orchestra in costumes 
of the Spanish era gave a special program of Spanish music, 
much to the delight of the diners. The setting was surrounded 
with alternating palms, aglow with lights of the fiesta colors, 
and large golden plaques emblazoned with the standard of 
Spain. These were mounted on tall staffs, embellished with 
streamers and pompons of the Jubilee coloring, alike inter- 
woven with golden poppies, creating a unique and attractive 
brilliancy to the ensemble. 

This exclusive dancing organization, now in its tenth year, 
will commence the winter activities with a butterfly ball, Sep- 
tember 19, at the Fairmont. 

* * * 

Corra Harris, the writer, was guest of honor at a tea given 
at the St. Francis by Mrs. Gilbert L. Stradley. Mrs. Harris 
is visiting here from her home in Georgia and has informally 
met a number of San Francisco women interested in her work. 
Mrs. Harris has written a number of distinctive stories of the 
lives of the humbler clergymen and their wives. 

* * * 

Mrs. George Wilhelra entertained nearly a hundred friends at 
a barbecue given on the grounds of the Wilhelm estate, border- 
ing Lake Chabot, recently. Many San Franciscans attended 

the affair. 

* * * 

Dr. Mariana Bertola, president of the California Federation 
of Women's Clubs, was the honor guest of the Outdoor Art 
Club of Mill Valley at their Founders' Dav luncheon. 
* * * 

Cao and Bells 

Mrs. Marshall C. Harris, the newly elected president of Cap 
and Rells Club, has just issued her first calendar for the initial 
month of September, and. judging by the splendid announce- 
ments which extend the full length of the attractive buff card. 
Cap and Bells Club will have an intensely interesting year. 

The fust meeting will he on Thursday, September 3, opening 
with a luncheon in the gray room of the Fairmont Hotel, and 
Followed by reports and outlines from the executives and chair- 
men of the various sections and departments. Mrs. Charles 
Ker has charge of the program and will be heard in some of 
her beautiful song selections. 

The first social day will be on Thursday, September 17, with 




HOTEL < WTlOltlll It V 
7.-.0 Sutler Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From J2.50 per day 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria. California 

On the C.oa»t Highway Halfway Belween San Franeifco and I M Ancelet. 
An Inn of Unuaual Excellence. 

Wirt or Krile for rejeccationj on your nee* trip toulk 



Mrs. Henry M. Hastings, chairman, when a de- 
lightful musicale is the program for the day. The 
program in full is as follows: 

String Quartet Helmsbtirger 

Dorothy Dunnyon, Dorothy Crowell, 
Mrs. M. H. Shutes, Mildred Johnson 
Accompanist, Mrs. Martin F. Warner 

Contralto Solos Dorothy Crowell 

Trees Rosebach 

To the Sun Curran 

Accompanist, Mrs. William H. Fiord 

Violin Solos Dorothy Crowell 

Gypsy Dance N'achez 

Ave Maria Schubert 

Accompanist, Edna Linkowski 

Baritone Solos Harold Dana 

Vision fugitive 

Aria from the opera Herodiade Massenet 

Accompanist, Vern Kelsey 

Cornet Solos Grace Adams East 

Estrellita Frank La Forge 

Habanera, "Carmen" Bizet 

Accompanist, Mrs. William H. Hord 

Contralto Solos Ruth Hall Crandall 

Charity Hagemann 

The Wind Song Rogers 

To a Hilltop Cox 

Accompanist. Mrs. William FI. Hord 

Baritone Solos Harold Dana 

Star Eyes Oley Speaks 

Sylvia Oley Speaks 

Accompanist, Vern Kelsey 
Cornet, Violin and Piano 

Indian Dawn Zaminick 

For You Alone Geehl 

Grace Adams East, Dorothy Dunnyon, Mrs. William II. Hord 



International Poetry Evening 
At the Emerson Studio 

The Emerson apartment at 573 California Street, is a 
studio of surprises in the way of original entertainments. 
Each week Mrs. Valadin Emerson gives a dinner to the 
artistic circles of San Francisco which is always unique 
and interesting. Thursday evening of last week was given 
over to Internatioal poetry, representatives of several 
foreign countries reciting compositions of famed poets of 
their own lands, and. in some cases, reading their own ef- 
forts in this line. 

Mr. Madefrey Odhner read two published poems written 
by Mrs. Eleanore F. Ross — "Winds" and "Despair," be- 
sides a poem of his own, "The Dons are Dead." and Messrs. 
G. Du Amaral. D. Marron, Geo. B. Senzaki, M. Jodwasky, 
Victor Nesedkin, G. B. Lai and Sam Mortland ("Scotty" 
of the Chronicle.) each gave recitations. 



History 

At the closing exercises of a public school. Marjorie Sir'th 
read an essay on "Grant's Work in the Civil War." 

It created quite an impression, and when she reached the 
surrender at Appomattox she expanded the impression to a 
sensation, for this is what she read : 

"Lee. the Southern commander, was handsomely attired 
in a bright new uniform, while Grant wore nothing but a 
ragged old Union suit." — Recorder. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? \ 

It's the water and the table — Xew dance hall. Special attrac- j 

tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- j 

ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write tor booklet. T. H. COR- J 

CORAN. Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. I 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 22, 1925 



-«\ s 9sys» 



-§^*<^- 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



•^aws* 



«*J& 



jf* 




CARL Eddy, chairman of the Rotary golf 
chapter, has- received 150 entries for the 
Del Monte High Jinks. 

* * * 

Carl is an ambitious worker. He claims to 
have more promises of trophies than entries. 

* * * 

Charlie "Ironside" Stewart will be there to 

defend his title. 

* * * 

AYalter Willoughby says he'll give him a good run for 

the cup. 

* * * 

Charlie Brandenberg will give free exhibitions of fancy 

trick shots each dav. 

* * * 

George Habernicht will introduce a bevy of swimming 
beauties in the Roman Plunge. 

* * * 

Bert Larkin says he'll top them off the tee. 

* * * 

Tom Walsh has promised to go providing the handicap 
committee will let him do his own fixing. 

* * * 

Johnny Crowe will supply all the vacuum cups. 

* * * 

YVeller Noble will wager that he is the medalist. 

* * * 

Frank Klimm claims to be the best southpaw entered. 

* * * 

Bob "Gunpowder" Matthey says he'll blast his own way 

around the course. 

* * * 

John Spohn says he'll dig himself out of the bunkers 

with a spade. 

* * * 

T. llarrv Smith sav- he'll win the Valentino cup. 

* * * 

Perry Cumberson will display a complete new line of 
neckwear. 

* * * 

Captain Jack Stoltz wants to play in the Scotch lour- 
some — lack says he's fund of anything with Scotch in it. 

* * *' 

Bill Taylor, the Manila whirlwind, will cut a big figure 
in his imported rigout. 

* * * 

Rudy Habernicht, the glassman. hopes I" cut his wax- 
round the course. 

* * * 

Geo. Gerhardt claims lie can play the course in 90 min- 
utes flat. 

* * * 

George Leathurbv will fly in his airplane from San Mateo. 

* * * 

Captain < ieorge Landenberger radiogrammed his regrets 
from China. 

* * * 

Mike "Paragon" Savanah will be the Czar of the sport 
goods — Mike hopes to make a hit with his latest importa- 
tions. 

* * * 

Bob Ohea. the giant of Rotary, will hook up with tiny 
Tim Patrick. 



Bru Brummier will engineer the whole affair. 

* * * 

Charlie Culver says he's feeling fine since he got his 
flat tires fixed — Charlie hopes to make the course the same 
day. 

* * * 

Bill Goodwin will startle the natives of Monterey when 
he show.- up in Ford spurt model. 

* * * 

Commodore Bob Thompson will make the trip to Pebble 
Beach in his new yacht, the Pawnbroker. 

* * * 

Angy Thomas, the lead man. says he'll supply all the 
pencil-. 

* * * 

Dr. Howard Dignan will give free medical advice. 

* * * 

"Doggy" Doc Kron will bark his way around the course. 

* * * 

Joe llenkel will give free demonstrations of how to fol- 
low through. 

* * * 

Sam Burtcheal, president of the Grandfathers' Club, just 
celebrated his 47th grandchild. 

* * * 

Sir Alvin Bernhard will represent the Bernhard family. 

* * * 

Every time Charlie Melrose, the iceman, passes you, he 
gives you the shivers. 

* * * 

Jud Sergeant, the artist, says he'll bring his own paint 
brush. 

* * * 

Cliff Ireland says he'- only sorry that Fire Commissioner 
AI Ehrman cannot come — Cliff had a hunch that he'd get 
lii- bankroll back. 

* * * 

Barney '"Google" Pederson, the ace from Lake Merced 
ing good. Barney hopes to make a score at the 19th 

hole. 

* * * 

Charlie \\\e\ sent his regrets from Madrid. 

* * * 

I'd Bacon hope- they give a ham as a prize. 

' * * * 

Charlie Trippler, the world's greatest orator, will be the 
principal speaker at the banquet. 

* * * 

Charlie Culver hopes to win the African golf match. 

* * * 

Topsy "Fish" Davis intends to have his golf scores 
canned. 

* * * 

i >scar Boldeman, the chocolate drop from Crystal Springs, 
will import an ebony coated caddie. 

* * * 

George Makins, the big Butter and Egg man. says he's 
irerything but the makings. 

* * * 

Duke Du Common will arrive in time from the East to 

be with the boys. 

* * * 

Bill Goetz, the mineral waterman, says he'll be all 
charged up for the occasion. 

i Continued on Page 15) 



August 22, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



-v%\ 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men'q and 
women's organizations. """ ,e events in mens and 




JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

Angelo Rossi, chairman of Diamond Jubi- 
lee Committee, is gaining in popularity as 
the time draws near for the celebration to- 
ward which we have been looking for lo, 
these many preparatory days. Mr. Rossi 
has the rare faculty of enlisting every one's 
enthusiasm as well as their activities, for to 
work with a will is to put joy into the labor 
and leads through the avenues of success. 
Word has been received by the committee that all the 
Native Sons and the Native Daughters Parlors of Sac- 
ramento will participate in the Admission Day parade as 
a unit. They will be preceded by an immense float and 
a drum corps of 22 pieces. Three hundred uniformed 
members will march in line from Sacramento County. 

Los Angeles and Pasadena will be represented on a 
large scale in the Diamond Jubilee parade, according to 
authentic word brought by Jake D. Allen of the Jubilee 
Committee. 

The joint Chambers of Commerce of the two cities will 
feature an immense float as a two-city offering to the cele- 
bration in honor of California's birthday. San Luis Obispo 
and Santa Barbara are two other southern cities partici- 
pating in the parade. 

The North Beach District, which was the historical set- 
ting of early San Francisco, is planning special celebration 
features, including a carnival setting which will present 
the fiesta spirit with colorings of the Jubilee celebration 
predominating. * * * 

Oakland's Fiesta 

The Lake Merritt district in Oakland will be converted 
into a city of fairyland lure for their annual fete, Thursday, 
August 27. 28 and 29, preceding the Diamond Jubilee fes- 
tivities. The fiesta of the Duns of Peralto will include a 
floral parade, illuminations of the "necklace of pearls" 
around Lake Merritt, motor boat races, aquatic events 
and an evening athletic carnival. 

* * * 

First Fifty-Cent Pieces 

Senator Samuel M. Shortridge received the first one of 
(lie new fifty-cent pieces which have been mimed in com- 
memoration of the California Diamond Jubilee. The glit- 
tering half dollar was sent to Senator Shortridge by Michael 
Kellev. director of the San Francisco mint, by the airplane 
service, while the United States senator was at San Dies". 

It was due to Senator Shortridge's introduction in Con- 
gress of the measure authorizing the coins that these new 
fifty-cent pieces are now being used and in recognition of 
his successful efforts the first piece of coin was hurried to 
him in the southern city where he was sojourning a while. 

* * * 
Stockton Horse Show 

Charles O, Yirden has ottered a donation of $2000 for 
the stakes for five gaited horses at the Stockton Horse 
Show, August 26 to September 2. which is expected to 
surpass all other shows of the kind ever held on the Pa- 
cific Coast in point of entries. Two hundred and seventy- 
five entries were made some time ago and by this time 
the number has most likely been increased. 
(Continued on Page 15) 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

Mrs. Susannah Bray, one of the best informed women of 
California on matters of pending interest, has compiled an 
interesting survey of romantic California. 

Mrs. Bray declares that every name which has been 
selected has a peculiar significance and history of its own, 
and pleads with all the fervor of her patriotic impulses 
that these names remain unchanged. She places first of all 
the name San Francisco, derived from Saint Francis, and 
follows this city's derivation with those of San Mateo, 
Saint Matthew, and San Jose, derived from Saint Joseph. 

She urges that the names made famous by Bret Harte 
remain intact and although they are derived from fiction, 
Mrs. Bray sees a reason why they should be held in their 
original form. These names of the Bret Harte days are, 
Whiskey Flat, Lazy Hill and Mad River. 

"What's in a name?" queries Mrs. Bray. "In Califor- 
nia many of the names reveal her true history. By divid- 
ing her place names into three periods, they act as a key 
to California's early history. First, there is the Indian 
period with Indian place names; second, the Spanish and 
Mexican period, with corresponding names; third, the 
American and Pioneer period, where overland immigrants 
usually named a place from some experience." 

With profound respect for these names and with an ap- 
preciation following intense and devoted study Mrs. Bray 
specializes on the periods which she will some day incul- 
cate in one of her published volumes. She names nine 
counties in California whose names are of Indian origin: 
Colusa, Modoc, Xapa. Shasta, Tehama. Tuolumne. Yolo, 
Mono and Yuba. 

"Petaluma," Sonoma C6unty, is from a Coast Mi wok vil- 
lage of the same name and means, "flat back." states Mrs. 
Bray in her careful survey; Loconoma Valley in Lake County, 
is an Indian combination lor "wild goc ise and village," 

In assigning tribute for the way Santa Cruz Islands 
were named. this studious Cnlifornian tells this story: "Santa 
Cruz Island means Holy Cross and derived its name from 
the misfortune of early padres who lost there a staff at 
the end of which was a cross. The padres gave it up as 
lost. But some Indians appeared the very next day to re- 
turn the staff which they found and from this circum- 
stance the fathers named the island, Santa Cruz." 

Los GatOS, meaning Cats, was so named because of the 
wild cats which even to this day are said to be found in that 
region. ( >nc of the richest diggings in early California 
days was called "Humbug Flat." so called to decoy peo- 
ple away from there and so keep secret its rich yieldings. 

Mrs. Bray tells an acceptable story of Holden's Gardens, 
another place of extraordinary richness, about one mile 
i in Sonora. Holder sought to hold it by putting an en- 
closure around it and planting it in vegetables for use in 
his hotel in Sonora. This being contrary to local laws 
made by the miners themselves, a regular battle was fought. 
the enclosure was torn down, the vegetables destroyed and 
a gre.it amount of gold was mined from Holden's garden. 

"The Pacific Gas and Electric Company, spending mil- 
lions, have brought the Pit River to the center of the stage," 
said Mrs. Bray in one of her research articles. "Pit River 
was named because pits from ten to fifteen feet deep were 
dug. in which Indians caught man and beast. These man 
(Continued on Page 15) 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 22, 1925 



50 CENTS PER COPY 
Postage, U. S., 10 Cents. Canada and Foreign, 20 Cents 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Enclosed $ for which please send to my 

address copies of DIAMOND JUBILEE 

EDITION OF SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Name.. 



Address. 



Also mail copies direct to the following: 

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The 



Diamond Jubilee 

Edition 

of the 

San Francisco 
News Letter 

will be published 

September 5, 1925 

112 PAGES 

Will Be Devoted to an Historical Review of 
the Story of California. It Will Be Illustrated 
by the Finest Collection of Old Photographs 
in Existence, Depicting Dramatic Incidents 
During the Pony Express and Vigilantes Days, 
Including: a Period From 1837 to 1925. 



Ord 



er copies now 



50c per copy 

Postage, U. S., 10c 

Postage, Foreign, 20c 



<Our 60th Anniversary Number, Published in 1916, ivhich con- 
tained a number of engravings that will be re-published in the 
Diamond Jubilee Edition, has had a ready sale at $10.00 per copy 
during the last four years.) 



August 22, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

JUBILANTES, not Vigilantes, will 
soon be taking possession of San 
Francisco and the bay district ; the days 
of the gay fiesta will return for a brief 
while ; doctors and misters and honor- 
ables will doff their everday titles and 
answer to the "Don" and the "Caballero" 
and the "Senor" ; yet, try as we may to 
turn backward the hands of time, there 
will always be an anachronism hanging 
around somewhere. 

Don Francisco will still spend a goodly 
portion of his time in his motor car, 
Senor Oakland will visit the haunts of 
romance and history in his chugging 
Lizzie and Caballeros Berkeley and Ala- 
meda, add decked up in red, yellow and 
green, will join the parade enjoying the 
comforts derived from a modern age. 

It's very much like the spectator at 
the baseball or football game. He's very 
much interested in athletics but he pre- 
fers to enjoy it from a seat in the 
bleachers rather than to enter the 
arena and walk the chalk lines of train- 
ing" routine. 

Back in the days when California was 
just a budding young thing, tripping 
around in her early garb of statehood, it 
was a three days' rule from the capital 
at Monterey to the sand hills of San 
Francisco and two days more to Captain 
Sutter's outpost up on the Sacramento. 
We cannot expect everyone to enter 
into the real spirit of this by-gone day, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

first because we'd probably fall off the 
horse if we tried it and second, because 
there wouldn't be enough horses to 
go around. 

Therefore, we'll have to enjoy our ro- 
mantic atmosphere with the aid of the 
modern motor car, with a day's jaunt to 
the old Fort museum a Sacramento, an- 
other day's excursion to the scene of the 
Bear Flag Revolution at Sonoma and 
a week-end of fun and frolic visiting old- 
time scenes down in the Circle of En- 
chantment that makes up the peninsular 
district about Monterey. 

What a help a good sturdy motor car 
would have been to Fremont and his 
pioneers. It requires quite an imagina- 
tion, however, to picture even the best 
of the modern cars making much head- 
way over the highways of those color- 
ful days of gold. Personally. I like our 
present day methods of travel much bet- 
ter than the more romantic style of our 
forbears and likewise, I much prefer our 
present day road surfaces. It's really too 
bad that the efforts of our State High- 
way Commission have destroyed much of 
the romance in the arteries of travel. 
Adobe trails make up wonderful material 
for artists of pen and brush and a smooth 
concrete lugs in too much commercialism 
for romantic stimulation even in the most 
imaginative mind. But as for me. mv 
imagination refuses to work, anyhow, if 
it is continually being bumped along on a 
highway full of chuck holes, ami I'd 
rather forget the old-time trails in the 
comforts of modern concrete. 

To get into the real spirit of 1850, 
you'll have to compromise on the present- 
day modes of transportation and visit the 
scenes of California's early days. There 
are still plenty of* monuments of the red- 
blooded fifties, and Monterey. Sacra- 
mento and Sonoma do not house them all. 
Travel over the Mother Lode Highway 
that extends from Sonora through Col- 
oma and Auburn to Crass Valley ; stroll 
about through the streets of some of 
these "Cities That Were" with their iron- 
shuttered buildings and narrow, winding 
streets: drive through the grand canyon 
of the Tuolumne and pase on the banks 
of the American and the Mokelumne. 
Here you are away from the disturbing 
noises of modernity; here you may really 
commune with the spirits of the fifties. 
the ghostly figures that march through 
the stories of Bret Harte and Mark 
Twain. 

One of these vine-covered buildings 
can give you more of the atmosphere of 
early California than a host of exploited 
(Continued on Page 16) 



13 



} acfi car o/>era/ec/\^ 
hj/ ro/iah/e 
c/taurfeurs 
u/Jio f/toroucf/ily under- 
stand their Aus/ttess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using- 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Graystone 270 

1«29 Fine Street 

San Francisco 



The Nicest Business 
Lunch in Town 




San 
Francisco 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



jtk 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO" 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Look for the 
GREEN and 
WHITE 
SIGN 



GENERAL 

GASOLINE & 
LUBRICANTS 



Meet Your 
General 
Dealer Today 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 22. 1925 



Finance 



A ( 



CCORDING to the statements of Ray L. Riley, state 
-controller, every family in the state pays $60 a month 
taxes in the aggregate. Vance H. Evans, of the California 
Taxation Improvement Association, estimates the total ot 
all taxes paid in California at $750,000,000 annually. From 
this again he estimates that 21.4 per cent of the income of 
the state goes in taxation. It is clear that President Cool- 
idge has reason on his side in his endeavor to reduce tax- 
ation. 

* * * 

The Southern Pacific Company estimates that it pays 
$10,000 a year to repair plush seats worn out by passengers 
using them as foot rests. The question as to whether the 
manners of the traveling public vary much from their home 
manners presents rather a nasty commentary on home life. 

* * * 

"Finance and Trade" remarks with considerable sagacity: 
"Oil is not simply a business. It is the great continuing 
mining romance of the twentieth century. If it is either 
coddled or strait-jacketed, it will languish, the supply will 

diminish and prices will rise." 

* * * 

Among local bank stocks, it is noted that Anglo Cali- 
fornia Trust Company, Bank of Italy, Humboldt Bank and 
San Francisco Bank have made very marked advances 
within the past two years, and more markedly still within 
the past two months. One of our best local authorities 
puts the reason for this marked improvement upon the care- 
ful advertising of these banks as they have recently devel- 
oped it. 

* * * 

The fate of Inyo County now appears to be sealed. The 
Inyo Independent has gone out of existence after fifty-five 
continuous years of publication and the whole of the county 
is now drying up. Los Angeles, in spite of all its wealth, 
comes a little high to the rest of the Southern portion of 

the State. 

* * * 

A recent statement of President Coolidge should be re- 
membered and used to confute agitators. It is as Follows: 
"Everyone knows who makes any investigation, that the 
people of this country own the property of the country. 
America is neither owned nor dominated by a small group 
of rich men who take a disproportionate toll out of the 
earnings of the poor. It would be more nearly correct, 
considering all of the present conditions, to say that our country 
is owned and controlled by the people themselves." 

* * * 

Professor Don D. Lescohier. in a speech before the Com- 
monwealth Club on unemployment, said : "The state em- 
ployment offices of California are better than in some states, 
but they are woefully behind what is being accomplished 
in some other states. I can name to you offices in the 
United States and Canada, where the public employment 
work is in a far more advanced stage than here, and where 
it is playing a far more important part in the industrial life 

of the state." 

* * * 

Single premium policies are getting to be popular in 
England. Supertaxes, meaning income taxes and inheri- 
tance taxes, are exempted when used for life insurance. 
Many of the wealthy class, therefore, take large sums of in- 
surance, paying a single premium, and then immediately 
borrow almost the whole of the reserve on the policies. 

Life insurance on several prominent San Francisco prize- 
fighters has been written by the San Francisco agency of 
the Minnesota Mutual Life. The policies aggregate about 
$200,000. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been Increased 
by mergers or consolida tions with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fu:id 479,081.25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7tli Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Hniftht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4%) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid l'n Capllnl *20.000.000 $20,000,000 Hcaerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER COO BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco OITlce: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. fill l.'l'll I II II 

Manager Assr. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, 



Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service— No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re -finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. FLUMES. 

PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

San Franrlnro. Calif. Lou Angreleii. Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santn Fe Avenue 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco | 
Phone Kearny 391 



August 22, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from Page 11) 

The Hotel Whitcomb lias proffered stakes of $1000 for 
gaited horses. The Stockton Commercial and Sav- 
ings Bank has offered $1000 for six-in-hand driving and 
the Stockton and Clark hotels offers the same amount for 
hunters and jumpers. The Stockton Chamber of Com- 
merce gives a stake for heavy harness horses and the 
Stockton Merchants' Association for heavy harness ponies 
and W. \V. .Mines for junior five-gaited horses. 



news and features on Tuesday at 7 and 8 o'clock and short 
stories for beginners at 7 and for advanced students, at 8 
on Wednesday evening. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from Page 11) 

traps, for such was their primary use, were small at the 
mouth, widening toward the bottom so that exit was im- 
possible, even if the victims escaped the sharpened elk and 
deer horns that were strategically placed for his reception. 
Mrs. Bray continues with her fascinating tales and his- 
torical data about other interesting California points, and 
in deference to her carefully compiled letters, grateful stud- 
ents are looking eagerly forward to the time when Mrs. 
Bray's information may be spread broadcast through the 
publications of her own writings. She has presented many 
of these articles before the Association of the Pioneer 
Women of California, of which she is a member, and the 
Pacific Coast Women's Press Association. 



Appointment of Annette Adams 

San Francisco district. State Federation of Women's 
C'lulis, officers and chairmen recently endorsed the appoint- 
ment of Annette Abbott Adams of San Francisco, former 
Assistant United Siate Attorney-General, for member of 
the California Stale Committee on Criminal Law. The 
district is the first to take up the matter of urging Mrs. 
Adams' appointment, but it is expected the other districts 
of the federation will follow suit. The State Federation 
will also take up the matter at its nest executive session. 
The women are anxious for Mrs. Adams' appointment to 
Emphasize their stand— thai women should be appointed 
because they are really competent, not merely because they 
are women. 



GOLF 

(Continued from Page HO 

Harry Maxfield says he'll come all prepared with a bushel 
of gold ore from his mine in Nevada. 

* * * 

Loni- Campaglia, the sugar Baron, will make his initial 
bow with Rotary at Del Mori 

* * * 

Join, Henderson of Mount Olivet expected to have made 
the trip but owing to -tie-- of business had to decline. 



U. C. Extension 

After-vacation classes in short story writing, feature 

stories and new s writing arc being announced by University 

i lifornia Extension to organize Tuesday ami Wednesday 

evenings. September 1 and J. All classes will meet at the 

Pacific building, Market and Fourth streets. 

The classes, which are open to the public, will be con- 
ducted by Gilbert G. Weigle, whose success for the past 
live year- is shown by the many former students who are 
d writers of fiction, feature and news stories. 
istrations are being made at Extension headquarters. 
140 Kearny Street, phone Kearny 100, and other Inten- 
sion offices. All the courses offer university credit. In- 
terested students are invited to \isit the opening cl 



Styles in Home Interiors 

The trend of the times in the finish of living rooms is 
veering around to natural wood finish again. Painting and 
white enamelling is excellent for kitchen, bath and even bed 
rooms, but for the general living rooms an atmosphere of 
greater dignity and hospitality is generally desired. This 
is accomplished through leaving woodwork of the various 
hardwoods either in their natural tones or brightened up in 
the finish applied, to suit the individual taste. 

Southern gum has made a unique place for itself as a pop- 
ular hardwood for interior trim and has held its importance 
for some time. The soft velvety tans and browns of this 
wood make a rich background and harmonize with hangings 
and furniture of most any description. 

A surprising number of the new homes are being finished 
in Philippine mahogany. The rich coloring and beautiful 
grain of this wood is very pleasing and it works up exceed- 
ingly well in the woodwork of a room and in panelling. Its 
moderate cost puts it in reach of all. 

The standbys for beautiful interiors since the first fine 
homes of California, have been oak, walnut and the genuine 
mahogany. These woods are as good today as they have 
been all down the years, and no changes in styles have taken 
from them their premier standing among hardwoods for the 
interior finish of beautiful homes and now for apartments. 

The panel wainscoting is a deservedly popular finish and 
especially the beautiful Elizabethan or Tudor style with 
panels to the ceiling. This style calls for plain or quarter 
sawn oak and gives an atmosphere of solid elegance worthy 
of the fine homes now being erected so widely in these parts. 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the*. 

VALLFYo/ the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms." 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

\ i*il Sonoma County'* Famous Retorts and Mineral (Warm Water) Swimming 

Tanks From This Hotel. 

Rales Exceptionally Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 



FETTERS' HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Mas- 
seur in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming 
pool. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Rates, $18 up. 
Write George Fetters, Mgr., or Peck-Judah. 



i 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 
l lhosEKsni Shirts '/hosUfeilt 

WP «2SEL «? 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearsv Street Phone Kearny 5714 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 22, 1925 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 7) 

Golden Gate 

Justine Johnstone, Broadway's beau- 
tiful stage "star who is called the world's 
most beautiful woman, will headline 
the bill this week at the Golden Gate, 
appearing in a new act written by Ed- 
win Burke entitled "Judy O'Grady." 
Aside from her great beauty, Miss 
lohnstone is an actress of sterling 
worth. Assisting her are Bruce El- 
more. Phyllis Blake, and Maxwell Sel- 
ser. 

A second strong feature of the bill 
is the appearance of Duci De Kerek- 
jarto, royal violin virtuoso, and one of 
the country's best violinists. He is ac- 
companied' at the piano by Maurice 
Eisner. 

limmy Savo, character comedian and 
eccentric dancer, has a comedy act of 
much merit ; assisted by Joan Franza 
Savo he burlesques slow motion pic- 
tures, and other comedy stunts. Al- 
len White's Collegians, a peppy little 
jazz band with a lot of novelties, are 
on the bill; Dolly Kay, exponent of 
syncopated ditties ; Tareila and Pick- 
ering are a clever dance team. On the 
screen, the feature is another of John- 
ny Hines' laugh riots called "The 
Crackerjack" in the role of an ambi- 
tious pickle salesman. 

There will be the usual short films 
and music by Grace Rollins Hunt at 
the organ and Claude Sweeten and his 
orchestra. 



who were such a knock-out at this 
theater last week, are staying over for 
a second big week in a brand new of- 
fering. 



Orpheum 

The Orpheum will be the scene of 
another most entertaining bill this com- 
ing week, in which the headline acts 
will be garnered from the corners of 
the earth, including one called "Span- 
ish Dreams" said to be one of the most 
colo'ful and magnificent productions 
ever assembled on the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit, and featuring a large cast of prin- 
cipals including Hartados Royal Mar- 
imba Orchestra, Warren Jackson, Al- 
berta Gallo, and Nita, Argentine's fore- 
most dancer. 

Ernest R. Ball, the popular song 
writer who is the author of "Mother 
Macree" and numerous other hits, is 
bringing a bevy of lovely maidens in a 
new act ; Arthur Wanzer and Miay- 
belle Palmer in a medley of mirthful 
memories; Joe Rome and Lou Gaut. 
two clever comedians in "When Ex- 
tremes Meet"; Bob Carleton and Julia 
Ballew present a clever turn, and the 
team of Berg and English, "The Dark 
Horses of the Screen" will complete 
the list of newcomers. 

Ben Bard and Jack Pearl, those two 
funny men who made such a tremen- 
dous hit in "Artists and Models" and 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued from Page 13) 
structures where restoration has done 
much to annihilate the charm of age. If 
vou would visualize the days of the 
padres, visit not one of the missions 
which loving care has restored to a sem- 
blance of its former self, but stand 
among the ruins of La Purissima, in the 
midst of a wheat field, off the main road 
of travel. Forget the modern age and 
dream as did the young Junipero Serra 
without the jarring contacts of city or 
town or guide. Stand among the tumb- 
ling adobe walls of Soledad or in the 
chapel of San Miguel. Then, and then 
only, will you be able to form a picture 
in your mind's eye of the glory of the 
mission era in California. 

If you would enjoy the scenery and 
romance of this great state, you must not 
always cling to the main travelled ways, 
as many of the interesting relics of the 
early days are located off the highways,' 
in some pleasant valley or on some iso-l 
lated hill no longer a part of the world, 1 
of today. Here you will find the spirit' 
of the olden time has been preserved and 
here you may dip into romance to your! 
heart's desire. ) 



Brieflets 
"Speed Limit Through Nazareth 10 
Miles Per Hour." So reads a sign on 
Mary's Well at Nazareth. 

* * * 

Women participated in French elec- 
tions, for the first time. May 4. 

* * * 

As a surveyor, George Washington 
dragged his chain along the surface of 
the ground, up and down hills, with- 
out making any allowance in his cal- 
culations for the hills. Consequently, 
modern surveyors are having trouble 
checking up his old surveys in what is 

now Maryland. 

* * * 

Hired men on many western farms 
refuse to plow unless the farmer gives 
them at least twelve horses in a hitch. 
Twenty-horse hitches frequently pull 
six fourteen-inch bottoms. 

* * * 

Cortez's Spanish forces were in need 
of gunpowder at one time and as sul- 
phur was a necessary constituent of 
gunpowder one of his officers per- 
mitted himself to be lowered into the 
crater of the Mexican volcano Popo- 
catepetl where he obtained it. 

* * * 

Power alcohol is being distilled from 
the crushed prickly pear cactus of Aus- 
tralia. 



The sun rises in the Pacific and sets 
in the Atlantic in the Panama Canal, 
because the east end of the canal points 
toward the Pacific and the west end 
toward the Atlantic. 

* * * 

Mark Twain always wanted the door 
of his writing room closed. He ex- 
plained that "an open door did not let 
the cold in, but let the cosiness out." 

* * * 

Warts are supposed to be cured in 
Kishu, Japan, by touching them with 
a stick, the other end of which touches 
a tree. The stick is then tapped with 
the injunction, "warts, pass over the 
bridge." This is uttered three times. 
The warts are then supposed to pass 
into the tree. 

* * * 

Twenty-one million letters went to 
the Dead Letter Office last year. 

* * * 

Traffic increases a third every decade. 

* * * 

Water, land and air are now being 
used for traffic between Detroit and 
Cleveland. 

* * * 

Asiatics who served in the United 
States Army, Navy i>r Coast Guard 
during the World War are not entitled 
to naturalization, the Supreme Court 
has decided. 

* * * 

Sepia is a rich brown pigment pre- 
pared from the ink, or black secretion, 
of various cuttlefishes of the same 
name. 

* * * 

Crop reporting by airplane observers 
is now being tried in North Carolina 
by the United States Department of 

Agriculture. 

* * * 

A trained bird dog has been retriev- 
ing, for his boy master, golf balls 
driven by players at a Chicago golf 
course. Players were puzzled by the 
mysterious disappearance of their golf 
balls until they caught the dog in the 
act of carrying the ball to the boy. 

* * * 

Many regions of Latin America have 
excellent hardwood timber forests far 
in excess of their own needs, so much 
so that in some instances they destroy 
them to utilize the land for agriculture. 

* * * 

The "busy bee" spends more time in 
the hive than she does outside hunting 
nectar. She only makes 31.65 trips 
during her lifetime and gathers only 
eight-tenths of a gram of nectar. 

* ' * * 

American gray squirrels, imported 
into England, have driven the native 
British red squirrel from the parks. In 
America the red squirrel is considered 
the best fighter of the two. 



August 22, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Mr. Blabbitt on Gab 



ttT OTHARIO" seems to be a favorite name with news- 

\—j paper editors and reporters for others than themselves. 
Everyone, high or low enough to gain their jaded attention, 
is termed a "gay Lothario," if there is the least bit of love 
making or flirting connected with the case. I, for one, am 
not so sure who Lothario was, and I am not going to dis- 
play my knowledge of the subject in a vulgar, public manner. 
Certain it is that this romantic character has shrunk to a 
hackneyed journalistic phrase, which writers on high school 
and college publications will be asked, by solicitous professors, 
to refrain from using. 

Time is death on fads. It is a good thing sometimes that 
the clocks are on the job. 

Until recently, wide trousers have been the fashion for men. 
The new styles will feature narrower ones. The navy is very 
strict about imitation of its sailor uniforms, and the blue- 
jackets came very near losing their individuality. Probably 
the tight rope performers are due for a jolt, next. 

Fashion is nothing but polite fads, assembled and worn 
by those who can afford them. Americans may be out of 
style sometimes, but they are never out of fads. This fact_ 
accounts for the prosperity of varied industries in this coun- 
try. There are even runs on new and different foods — first 
it is bran, then stuffed wheat, then yeast, etc. 

Each sport, in its season, becomes a worth while fad. Just 
now baseball and tennis hold the boards. One California girl, 
in particular, occupies front and center of the international 
stage, which leads to the reflection that, if Helen Wills, the 
game's hers. The present tennis racket is an interesting dis- 
turbance. 

Diamond Jubilee hat bands are not a fad, they are a neces- 
sity. The more bands there are on the streets, the noisier ami 
more successful the big fiesta will be. The probability that 
Jubilee garters for girls will be popular is a snap. 

The present vogue of short skirts is refreshing and educa- 
tional. Like servants and children, they reveal many things, 
heretofore family secret--. 

I read recently that veils are coining back into style. This 
is really a promising indication. After all. a veil is better 
than nothing. Seven veils would be stodgy. 

There is a new dance song out for tea hounds called. "The 
San Francisco Bay." Thev say it is a mastiffal creation. 

With a new football season in the offing, it will soon be time 
for sporting writers to change their vocabularies. There always 
seems to be more written about pig-skins than sheep-skins — 
probably because the former are kicked about mo 

Two young men in the bast have achieved ;i record of 
seventy-three hours without sleep, and say that they suffered 
no ill effects. They evidently live in some locality where 
there are no nocttirnallv barking dogs, yowling cats or screech- 
ing radios. A whole week without sleep is nothing in our 
lively neighborhood. I suppose these wide-awake gentlemen 
will now come forward with proof that sleep is also a fad. 

"Watson, the veronal, please." 

There are many useful fads yet to be invented. If waiters 
and bell hops would start an anti-tipping fad. or if bootblacks 
would inaugurate an elbow grease fad. everyone would be 
pleased as well as benefited. The trouble with fads, fashions 
and foibles is that they are too blamed expensive. No one 
denies, however, that they are useful. Take money, for in- 
stance, it is changed millions of times every day — think of 
all the heads mixed up in this, the n't of all fads. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Recent arrivals at Feather River Inn include the follow- 
ing: 
Wednesday, August 12 

W. W. Bender, Oakland; C. B. Osborne, ( lakland ; E. H. 
Whittaker, Oakland; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. B. Kilner, Los 
Angeles ; Arthur Strasburger, Los Angeles ; Jay Turner and 
wife, Los Angeles; Mr. and Mrs. William H. Kelley, Phila- 
delphia ; Chas. W. Adams, San Francisco ; Dr. Henry J. 
Phillips and wife, San Francisco ; Miss Cora Phillips, San 
Francisco; Miss Mildred Phillips, San Francisco. 
Thursday, August 13 

J. T. Bullock, San Francisco; H. A. Rutcbart, Jamestown, 
California; H. W. Gilbert, Locust Valley, L. I. N. Y. ; Mr. 
and Mrs. A. G. Rea, Los Angeles ; H. D. Cushing and wife, 
Oakland ; Dr. J. S. Kergan and wife, Oakland. 
Friday, August 14 

T. M. Strobridge and wife, Hollywood; Janet and Betty 
Strobridge, Hollywood ; T. MacFarlane and wife, Watson- 
ville, California ; E. R. Stone, San Francisco. 



Three Generations of Customers Vouch for Us 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 



TRADEMARK. --. -_- -™ v 4 

i|iP Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities In engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angeles 




CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE VOIR Ct!tS WA8BKO AND CREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rate*. SSc per day: fT.IW) per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

*\t Floor* for SerTlce. nod Slorace of Automobile* 



IS 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
SUMMONS 

Ka. 159769 

Action Brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in nnd for the City and 
County of San Francisco, nnd the Cam- 
plaint Filed in the Oltice of the Couuty 
Clerk of Said City and County. 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONESSl 

San I r; i — Uurlinprnme 

Weal, 7D3 47S 



Phone StrrEn 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shrerc & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME. ANTIQUE USD COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 I'usi Street at Grant Avenue 

San Frniu'lMi'o, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Iranritco, Alameda 

and San Mat-;, Count t«i 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



8t 8 EMERSON ST. 



Kearny 644-645 Palo alto 315-J 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Walter Samuel Woodward. Plaintiff, vs. 
Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an 
action brought against you by the above- 
named Plaintiff in the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer the 
Complaint filed therein within ten days (ex- 
clusive of the day of service) after the ser- 
vice on you of this summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere 
within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
bonds of matrimony now existing b< I 
plaintiff and defendant, on the ground of de- 
fendant's willful neglect; also for general 
relief, as will more fully appear in the Com- 
plaint on nle, to which special reference is 
hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the 
said Plaintiff will take judgment for any 
money or damages demanded in the complaint 
as arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for other relief demanded in the com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of tin- 
Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San B'ranclsco. 
If. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By W. S. SHAFER, Deputy Clerk. 

Dated July 27, 1925. * 

AUSTIN" LEWIS, 

473 Mills Building, San Francisco, Calif., 
Attorney fur Plaintiff. 

No. 146.330 

SUMMONS 



August 22, 1925 

Fight Stopped 
"Black boy, whut yo* all runnin' 
for?" 

"Fse gwine to stop a fight." 

"Who all's fightin'?" 

"}cs' me an' another niggah." 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint 
filed in the office of the County Clerk of said 
City and County. 

Frederick Marriott, Plaintiff, vs. N. F. Wil- 
son, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to: N. F. Wilson. Defendant. 

You are hereby directed to appear and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 
above, brought against you in the Superior 
Court Of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, within 
ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and County; 
or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the Bald 
Plaintiff will lake judgment for any money 
or damages demanded in the complaint as 
arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for any other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the .Su- 
perior Court at the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, 

i iated April 30, 1924. 

[Seal] II. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAWNETT",, 

Deputy Clerk. 
AUSTIN' LEWIS. Attorney fur Plaintiff, 178 
Mills Hiiikling, San Fram-iso. -'aliforma. 

NOTICE TO CKEDITORS 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. No. 41,989. 
Dept. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Ilynes, administrator of the estate of 
John Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within four i i I 
months after the first publication of this no- 
lice to the said administrator, at his office. 
858 l'h elan Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
ornia. which said last-named office the under- 
signed selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of John 
Oliver, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES. 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, July 7. 
1925. 

CULEINAN & HICKEY, 
Attorneys for Administrator. 




(Swells 

^*^HAXIONAl CPJESI 

(offee 

-tfte better it gets- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

t .800,000 copi were nerved at the Pnn- 
n in ii Pnclflo International Ex poult Ion 



<<°?*% 



PIONEER 




>ri_U".:ILiJ 



The 
Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther It be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satis fac- 
tion. There Is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
_ printer or sta- 

j ■ i -j.r j? tioner to show 
'■■ ' n icJl you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 




II V l A11IN STIO \MERS PROM 
NEW 4 ORIS 

Itn i i i Sailing! via Panama Canal 

THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO 

570 Markrl St.. San Francisco 




WHERE TO DINE 




ICE CREAMS 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 

£ CALIFORNIA SIS LUNCHEON 

Cray.lone DINNER 

3100 3101 '"■■> I"'™ r^ic rx 



w 




'asSa 



Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 1 1 :30 to 2 :30 
and tea from 3 to 5 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 









445 Powell St., 

San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchant's lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Trivate din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



j BLANCO'S 






2 O'l'nrrell nnd Lnrkln Streets Phone 


Frnr 


kiln j 


j No visitor should leave the city without din 
j 1 in the finest cafe in America 


ng 


j 


I Luncheon (11i30 (o 2 p. m.) - 

I Dinner, Week Day* --..__ 

I Dinner, Sundays and Holiday'* - - - - 


\ 


7«c j 

VI. .10 



L 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

IS Third Avenue. SA\ MATBO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 

i I 30 .i -" i" " 00 p. m. 
P. ni 

nd Holidays 
1 p in only 
CLOSED i:n:in \in\n \ i^ 
n.iii niock tram HUchnay 




U-Miie II, ,i -. 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OP1 N sin A. H, To 11 >w p, M. 

i NSI RPASSED n ISINE 

Cabx Leonhabdt 

lormerh of 
Coldoa Catr Park Ca.ino 



CLIFF-HOUSE 



Plato Lunch 
Plate Dinner - 
Sunda) Dinner 
Phone Pacific U.i 



- - 

60c t 
■ - $1.00 



A l.i Cine at popular prices 
Baniiuet Rooms and Card Rooms 

Richard P. Roberts. Proprietor 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous l.rushing once or twice n day In 
taking' very good care of them. Brushing In only n part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Huve your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles thn* will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SI MCIAI.ISTS — Extractions; Crovrns; Self (leaning Bridges; 



• SPECIALIST! 



Porcelain Work nnd Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Hoarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters o: St. Dominic 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

«/PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 



239 Post Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 






DR B. W. HAINES 



Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell 

San Francisco 



DENTIST 



Hours 9 t„ 4 
Telephone Douglas 2949 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Su,[. Tr^.til Bv H.nH Onlr. -Suils Cllln! For an,! Del,. 

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Interesting people in all ranks 
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THE 



Diamond Jubilee 



EDITION 



oftht 



News Letter 



Will be Issued 



Sept. 5th, 1925 



ORDER COPIES NOW 



See Page 12 



Official Anthem of the California Diamond Jubilee, San Francisco 

California, To Thee! 

ANTHEM 



LEE S. ROBERTS 
WM. A. BREWER, Jr. 



Maestoso 




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Through dan-ger and 

To - day we in 

By dawn on Si ■ 

As God in His 



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Copyright MCMXXV by Lee S. Roberts 




Esttbllahtd July 20. I&J* 




TUB 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pac'fic Coast. 

Th« San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. 

1 1- from 1 s s l t.i liu". is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 235 Montgomery St.. San Francisco. California. 

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London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, AUGUST 29, 1925 



No. 9 



FROM DAN TO BEERSHEBA' 

By E. Farrand Ross 



Our Big Chief 

One would suppose that the exigencies of such 

Sal a position as chief of police of San Francisco, 
$S would be enough and to spare to keep one man 
'& busy in the way of official duties, without going 
j outside this field of labor, but there are some ex- 
fl ecutives who are endowed with almost a super- 
^3 human capacity for public endeavor, and such an 
Bh executive is Daniel J. O'Brien. 
H Last Tuesday, before 500 visiting merchants 
I and buyers at the daily luncheon held at the 
Palace Hotel by participants of Market Week, 
»„„ o-iirien ch j ef O'Brien voiced his ideas on the difference 
between politics and a sense of responsibility. He emphasized 
co-operation of consumer and merchant, and reminded his au- 
dience that every citizen was a stockholder in his particular city, 
and that each and every one is meeting the expenses in tax bills 
for his respective section. 

Chief O'Brien possesses the rare quality of being interested 
in civic affairs outside the scope of his own legal obligations, 
and has proved himself in more ways than one, an official that 
San Francisco should be proud of. 



"Any Little Drink Will Do" 

Never do we open a daily newspaper but what we are con- 
fronted by some such lines as : "One dead, three blind from 
rum poison" ; or raids on hotels and cafes are described in lurid 
terms ; or an account of the shooting up of some "rum runner" 
inside the three-mile limit is given in language that is as full of 
romanticism as one of R. L. Stevenson's books. 

It does not need an ounce of reasoning power to realize the 
effect that this literature has upon the impressionable boy or 
girl : and taken together with the spectacular anil melodramatic 
features of some of the "movies" of the period, one only won- 
ders that more lawlessness and crime are not prevalent in city 
or countryside alike. 

Settlement workers have shown to the writer in brief but 
convincing English that the young foreigner, who so badly 
needs the right sort of "Americanization," is being taught, on 
the contrary, to break the law of the country under whose pro- 
lection he and his parents should be abiding, and of which coun- 
try he is gradually growing contemptuous. 

In schools and colleges or at dances, the youth with a bottle 
on his hip is the popular one, when in the old "wet" days, he 
would be thrown out bodily by his chums, had he flashed a 
flask before their indignant eyes. 

That the Eighteenth Amendment is a failure as a Federal law 
is proven by the fact that a few months ago President Coolidge 
turned over the fight for prohibition to municipal authorities. 



and return in sixty seconds ; aeroplane time from San Francisco 
to New York is approximately thirty hours ; racing launches 
can whisk through the water at the rate of forty miles an hour. 
The latest record for the automobile is a distance of 3,423 miles 
in 102 hours and 45 minutes. 

Space is being eliminated beyond the dreams of Jules Verne, 
or any other writer with a colossal imagination ; a trip to the 
moon may be, in the year 2000, a mere bagatelle for the hardy 
adventurer; the sun itself may be harnessed and placed under 
the yoke of some power company ; but, in the meantime, how 
about the human being himself, that toiling moiling mole, who 
has accomplished all these wonders, and yet who, taking it alto- 
gether, is not one whit happier, in the aggregate or individually, 
than he was hundreds of years ago? Who is not any more ca- 
pable of forming lasting friendships than he was in the year 
100; who still is striving in multitudes, for just a bare existence, 
and who in the end cannot take with him from this world the 
very least of his earthly possessions? Like the human being 
of generations gone by, he can only live in the present, and the 
present is being so speeded up. and hustled along, that it has 
vanished into the past before it is fairly realized. 



Speed 



Cablegrams can now be sent from San Francisco to London 



Provincialism 

Have you met that class of easterners and middle west- 
erners and southerners and New Englanders, who dispense 
so freely to the long-suft'ering Californian, adverse criticism 
on our Golden State? It has been the fate of the writer to 
meet hundreds of these, and no amount of "come-backs" or 
arguments seem to have the desired effect of shutting them 
up. Rather lately a particularly obsessed person of this 
sort was extolling the pleasures of a certain southern town, 
where "one could sit on the porch in the evening, and visit 
with neighbors, which is something you can never do in 
California !" 

It did not occur to her that you can find all sorts and con- 
ditions of climate or weather in the state of California, and 
that sitting on porches is one of the mild out-door sports 
in any of our warm valleys. Nor did she seem to realize that 
people, as a rule, do not sit on porches in a great city like 
San Francisco, any more than they do in the heart of New 
York. 

Trying to figure out this strange antipathy to California 
which some of the strangers within our gates never appear 
to out-live. I have come to the conclusion that, born and 
bred in small provincial towns, their vision is small and pro- 
vincial, and cannot take in the immensity of our mountains; 
the illimitableness of our ocean, the grandeur of our torren- 
tial Sierran streams, the whole wonderfully majestic scheme 
of our Empire. They can only remember the Main Street 
of some "back East" or "down South" community, and all 
the magnificence of our far-flung horizons passes before un- 
seeing eyes. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2<>. 1925 




division this year was the investigation of the rates and 
service of the East Bay Company. 

We have called attention to these facts, as it is our pol- 
icy to say a good word for faithful public service in these 
times of reckless expenditure of public funds. 



It is almost too good to be true that real 
Real Money money is coming into the city from one of 
its enterprises. Units of the Moccasin Creek 
installation haying been duly hooked up. the city is actual- 
ly or on the very point, of receiving $5,479 a day for the 
sale of the water power. 

This was never contemplated at the time of the under- 
taking of the Hetch Hetchv project. It comes as a by- 
product sale and is almost providential in its arrival. In 
spite of all the delay and all the mis-management which 
has attended the Hetch Hetchy development today we are 
actually in receipt of unexpected money from it. 

But who is getting the money for the city? Is it the 
ardent public utility people, who after an expenditure of 
$45 000,000 are not vet ready to Furnish us water, but who 
require another $32,000,000 before they can make delivery, 
in the next few years? 

No, the public utility exponents are not to the trout, 
they are sulking in the corner, because the city is actually 
making something. The money comes from that dread- 
ful public utility corporation, the Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company. This bugbear of the demagogue is the source 
of our revenue for the sale of the power, the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company and the sagacity of our mayor are the 
only two instruments which have given us anything but 
talk and promises. 

Let it be remembered that when the political talkers 
charged with a great municipal enterprise failed to cau e 
it to" materialize and when the city was confronted with 
actual loss the blockade was broken by the combined efforts 
of the mayor and the Pacific Gas and Electric Company 
and taxation was correspondingly reduced. If the fact doe 
not rebuke the public ownership fanatics, nothing ever will. 



The report of the hydraulic division of 

Water Utilities the Department of Engineering of the 

State Railroad Commission, recently filed, 

is of surpassing interest and full of promise for the future 

of the state. 

During the fiscal year just passed the commission ren- 
dered 134 decisions involving water utilities. These were 
all investigated and reported upon by the hydraulic division. 
Besides these, 46 decisions were rendered by the commis- 
sion relating to security issues of water companies and 
these were handled largely through the co-operation of the 
hydraulic division, though, in the first place, they belonged 
to the department of finance and accounts. 

The hydraulic division safely and ably conducted the op- 
eration of the water utilities through the drought of last 
summer and managed a difficult situation with the least 
possible offense to the public and the companies engaged 
in the water business. 

This year, although the water supply in the Southern 
part of the state left much to be desired, by a careful de- 
velopment of additional water supplies and care in the ad- 
ministration of the water attainable and by more than ord - 
nary ability in the handling of saving, the conditions are 
greatly improved. Pro-rating water need hardly be neces- 
sary on this side of the Tehachapi this vear. Tlr's result i 
due almost entirely to the prudence and good engineering of 
the hydraulic division which has handled proceedings in- 
volving valuation of public water utilities amounting to 
$5,142,497. 

One of the most important of the tasks of the hydraulic 



This year we have a good bar- 
California Grain Crops vest. The annual report of the 
California Co-operative Crop Re- 
porting Service compiled by E. I 7 .. Kaufman, agricultural 
statistician, is at hand. Mr. Kaufman works in conjunc- 
tion with the state and federal departments of agriculture 
and his reports are the most dependable and authentic that 
we can get. According to this latest report our grain har- 
\ est is greatly in excess of that of 1924. 

The yield is roughly estimated as follows: wheat 10,412.- 
000 bushels as compared with 4.770,000 bushels in 1924; 
oats. 5,530.000 as compared with l.o45,000 in 1924; bar- 
lev 31,889,000 bushels as compared with 10,080,000 in 1924. 

Rice production is forecasted at 6,309,000 bushels, as 
against 4,497,000 last year. There is but one falling off; 
that is in the product of the bean crop, which was reduced 
by the hot weather and absence of moisture to 2,914,000 
bushels. 

The peach crop has felt the effects of the hot spell and is 
estimated at 79 per cent of normal, but even so it represents 
a yield of 387,000 tons as compared with 320,000 tons last 
year. 

The apricot crop with its 147,000 tons was 10,000 tons 
better than last year. 

The prune crop is 65 per cent of normal and the plum 
crop is 72 per cent of normal. 

The grape crop is at present about 79 per cent of normal. 
This crop declined in the month of July about eight points 
again, owing to the effect of the exceptionally hot weather. 

( In the whole the showing is excellent. Pasturage is 
about 93 per cent of normal and hay runs well, though, 
again, owing to the hot spell, there is a notable disappoint- 
ment as to pri ispects. 

Taken all in all, our agricultural activities are satisfac- 
ti iry. 



We note that the Board of Super- 
Salary Standardization visors has appropriated $5000 for 
the purpose of putting into effect 
the provisions of Charter Amendment No. 27 providing for 
a classification and grading of the positions by the Civil 
Service Commission for salary fixing purposes "under 
which like compensation shall be paid for like services." 
This action was approved at the November election. 

This action has really waited too long, but the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission has the good excuse that no funds were 
placed at its service for the purpose and even now the 
amount voted seems to be a very small foundation for the 
work to be done. But at least a beginning can be made to 
put an end to a condition which no well managed private 
firm would tolerate for a moment. 

It has been well pointed out that the present system of 
Civil Service classification is one of titles and salaries rath- 
er than one of duties, responsibilities and authority. This is 
a system which lias always been the bane of political bur- 
eaucracies and in the long run is completely inefficient. It 
tends to all the stupidity which is unfortunately inherent in 
public businesses and from which the federal government 
itself is not exempt. 

The San Francisco Bureau of Governmental Research, in 
commenting on this matter, says very well: "In the last 
analysis the salary fixing body determines to a great ex- 
tent the quality of the service. Compensation must be suf- 
ficient to attract those qualified to perform specific duties 
satisfactorily and economically. It is therefore of the ut- 
most importance that a comprehensive employment classi- 



August 29, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



iiiation, positively defining the character of the work in- 
volved in each position, be made available for salary fixing 
purposes." 

There is no question that the standardization program 
should be settled as early as possible. 

Supervisor John A. McGregor, chairman 
Towards Car of a special committee named to work out 
Line Unity a plan of unity of the street-railroad sys- 

tem of this city by the purchase of the 
Market Street Railways, has given an account of the work 
of the committee in that respect. We cannot really say 
that it has pushed the matter ahead very much, except in- 
sofar as the necessity of a speedy and just settlement of 
this matter is made all the more evident from his remarks. 

As the Supervisor says, the committee "has not yet 
reached a definite conclusion." With all due respect to 
the committee and without any unnatural expression of 
haste or impatience, we are compelled to express our opin- 
ion that a "definite conclusion" is precisely what the com- 
mittee should have reached and what it was formed to 
reach. We do expect a definite conclusion on so vital a 
matter from a committee which has been engaged on a 
specific task for a period of three years. 

It is noteworthy, however, that the committee has act- 
ually arrived at one conclusion, the one on which we have 
insisted and which is to be drawn from public activity 
applied commercially or industrially wherever it is met. 
That conclusion is stated as follows; "The Market Street 
Railways is very efficiently and economically managed, 
more so than could be expected under municipal owner- 
ship. The Market Street Railways is not subject to politi- 
cal whims." 

But apart from that sagacious and practical suggestion,, 
there is still the fact that unity of the railroads is an essen- 
tial in the development and the proper conduct of trans- 
portation in this city. 

There is also the indubitably ethical proposition that' 
the Market Street Railways are entitled to a fair return 
for their property and that to endeavor to deprive them' 
of that return is unfair and unworthy of a decent com- 
munity. 



Among all the discussion that has 
What Is a Sentence ? been taking place throughout the 
country as to the effectiveness of the 
control of crime, too little attention has been given to the 
fact that society has at least to be consistent in its dealings 
with criminals. One cannot have a wobbly system of man-' 
aging crime and expect that crime will be effectively man- 
aged. 'I I 

It may be that there is a defect in the method of punish- 
ment. It may be that punishment, as we know it, is not 
a deterrent and does not tend to mitigate crime. There 
arc all sorts of theories about that, ami as far as the non-ex- 
pert is concerned, one theory may be as good as another. 
We do not pretend to say. 

But there is no question that any theory, which is adopted 
as the theory for dealing with criminals in any particular 
community, should be consistently followed, otherwise it 
will not be respectfully considered by the class against 
which it is intended to operate. That seems to be sound. 

Now, in California we have a theory of punishment in 
accordance with which we have a very expensive legal 
equipment and prisons, and all sorts of paid officers. For 
the crime of murder we have various penalties from cap- 
ital punishment down. There is much to be said both for 
and against capital punishment. But. whatever may be 
the views of the people on that matter, there is no doubt 
about their intention that the crime of murder should be 
se\ erely punished. 

It will come as a shock to most people in this state to 



learn that the average term of convicted slayers sent to San 
Quentin is thirteen years. Now, whatever may have been 
the ideas of the legislators in this state on the question of 
murder, it is certain that they never contemplated a pun- 
ishment of merely thirteen years as adequate for murder. 

Highlights on Diamond Jubilee Week 

SWITZERLAND has joined the ranks of foreign nations 
participating in California's Diamond Jubilee, September 
5 to 12. 

United States Senator Samuel M. Shortridge and Frank 
B. Kellogg, Secretary of State received the following ac- 
ceptance: "The Government of Switzerland has advised 
the American minister at Berne that the Swiss Consul at 
San Francisco has been instructed to represent the Swiss 
Federal Council at the celebration." J. Freuler is the Swiss 
Consul at San Francisco. 

Other nations who will participate are England, France, 
Italy, Germany, Belgium, Cuba, Mexico, Netherlands, and 
Japan. 

* * * 

The Chambers of Commerce of Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena will join hands in the construction of an elaborate 
float which will be entered in the parade of September 12 
as representative of their county. 

Other Southern communities will be represented in the 
parade, including San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara. 
Word was also received yesterday that Salinas had decided 
definitely to arrange representation, and that Ventura 
county would attempt to organize a delegation to be sent 
to San Francisco. 

* * * 

Vice-President Charles G. Dawes' acceptance of the invi- 
tation to be San Francisco's honored guest during Cali- 
fornia's Diamond Jubilee Week, has conveyed intense 
satisfaction to Chairman Angello J Rossi and his fellow- 
members of the Jubilee executive committee. 

* * * 

The review of the fishing fleet is predicted to be one of 
the greatest sights of the Jubilee. There will be hundreds 
of boats in line. Just imagine hundre Is of brilliant lined 
little boats, parading down San Francisco Bay, on a warm 
moonlight night, on each craft a huge urn of colored fire, 
red. green or yellow, the swarthy skipper at the bow with 
his dark-eyed senorita or senora, perhaps strumming on a 
guitar a languorous tune of the troubadours, the boats gay in 
festival colors, their occupants in colorful native costume, 
and playing over the whole, colored searchlights which will 
bring out, with cameo-like distinctness, the charming scene. 

Fisherman's Wharf, with the love of festival peculiar l' 
the Latin race, is agog over the plans. Boats are being re- 
painted and overhauled, tackle repaired and everything 
being made shipshape. 

The "Mayor of Fisherman's Wharf," none other than A. 
Farina, known less picturesquely as the manager of the Crab 
and Salmon Fishermen's Protective Association, has thrown 
himself heart and soul into Jubilee participation. 

With John A. Picone, President of the Association, he 
lias agreed to enlist the entire fishing fleet in the pageant 
which bids fair to eclipse any of the famous "lantern pag- 
eants" and boat parades the world over. 



Saturday. September 5, the opening day. there will be a 
mammoth illumination containing the colors of the Dia- 
mond Jubilee, throwing a glare of red. green and gold that 
will illuminate the sky for a period of fifteen minutes. Labor 
Day. special pieces have been prepared, finishing with Ni- 
agara Falls dropping down the face of City Hall on the Polk 
Street side. Admission Day. September 9. will depict the 
"Days of '49." Saturday. September 12, a "Battle in the 
Skies" along the streets on which the parade will move, will 
be fired from the tops of twenty-four different buildings. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 29, 1925 




INSURES WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ 7dm Moore- 





Kattaerine Schwnrta 



Alcazar and President 

Theatrical 
history has 
been made 
in San Fran- 
cisco during 
the past ten 
months by 
Henry Duffy 
whose two 
1 egi t imat e 
pll ay houses, 
the Alcazar 
and the Pres- 
i d e n t, are 
among the 
most popu- 
lar on the Pacific Coast. When Duffy 
cast in his lot with San Francisco last 
November, he determined to make a 
success of the Alcazar which in years 
gone by had held fast to the reputation 
of having the best stock company in 
America. Duffy assembled an excel- 
lent company of players to appear with 
him in his productions. His first offer- 
ing, "The Cat and the Canary" ran for 
nine weeks. Then followed "Just Mar- 
ried," five weeks ; "So This Is London," 
ten weeks; "The First Year," six 
weeks, and "Irene," eight weeks. 

By this time the accumulation of 
good plays which Duffy was under 
contract to produce, forced him to ob- 
tain a second theater for their presen- 
tation. Accordingly he purchased the 
old Plaza on McAllister Street near 
Market, and at an expenditure of more 
than $75,000 fitted it out as one of the 
coziest and most modern of the city's 
legitimate play houses. Once again, 
Duffy was most careful in the selection 
of his players, and after the opening at- 
traction, "The Last Warning" had en- 
joyed four weeks of prosperity, he was 
fortunate enough to choose "The Best 
People," which is now in its fourth 
month, with capacity crowds still 
clamoring for admittance. 

There is a deal of romance in this 
great success of a young actor-mana- 
ger, and when it is mentioned that 
Henry Duffy also has been running a 
third theater, the Metropolitan at Se- 
attle throughout the summer, an idea 
of his genius may be gleaned. 

Perhaps Duffy's good fortune may 
be traced to the first week of his com- 
ing to San Francisco, when he was 
quietly married to Dale Winter, who 



By Katherine Schwartz 

has been his leading woman in all of 
the Alcazar productions. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

Bigger, brighter and better than 
ever, the New Singer's Midgets are to 
headline the bill at the Orpheum The- 
ater the coming week, beginning to- 
morrow's matinee. A tremendous 
company of talented tiny people with 
prancing ponies, three midget ele- 
phants, a carload of scenery and elec-' 
trical effects, will be seen in a stupen- 
dous production of entertainment 
which embraces every known art of 
the stage, including song, dance, com-, 
edy, magic, circus, acrobatics, wild 
West, and a fashion revue which is the 
envy of all their big sisters. The title 
of this colossal production is "So This 
Is I.illiput." 

Another notable event this week is 
the return of San Francisco's own fa- 
vorite daughter. Miss Eva Clark, who 
comes here fresh from her eastern tri- 
umphs in musical comedy and concert. 
With her is Dan Caslar in a song cycle 
which is of the most unusual and capti- 
vating style. 

Lewis and Gordon will present 
that famous character comedian Solly 
Ward, in a satirical comedy called 
"Babies." Ward is assisted by his 
own company, including Marion Mur- 
ray. Hickey Brothers are billed as 
"Two Elegant Gentlemen"; Arthur 
Hartley ami Helen Patterson have a 
delightful skit called "One Night"; 
Judson Cole is a bright spot on any 
bill ; Bert Melrose, the international 
clown will amuse with his daredevil 
stunts, including the famous Melrose 
fall which always calls forth much ap- 
plause. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

The headliner this week at the Gol- 
den Gate is Ernest R. Ball the famous 
song composer in a musical bill with 
many pretty girls, all talented artists, 
and who include a violinist, a 'cellist 
and a pianist. 

"Caterpillars" one of the funniest 
hills in vaudeville is also on the bill, 
staged by Frank Davis and Adele Dar- 
nell. "One Saturday Night" is the 
title of a novelty skit with music pre- 
sented by Arthur Wenzer and Max- 
belle Palmer. 

Bob Carleton and Tube Ballew will 



be seen in an offering called "A Feast 
For Fashionable Fancies"; the Kismet 
Sisters and their company have an of- 
fering of skill and strength, and Harry 
La. Vail is an aerialist. 

On the screen will be seen the pre- 
mier of "The Sporting Venus" Mar- 
shall Neilan's super-production from 
(ierald Beaumont's great story. An 
all-star cast headed by Blanche Sweet 
appear in this story. 

The usual short reels, Grace Rollins 
Hunt at the console, and Claude 
Sweeten and his orchestra complete 
the hill. 

* * * 

California 

There is a weird picture coming to 
the California opening today, when 
Cady. "King of the Midget Trust" 
will take place at the head of the screen 
play, "Beggar on Horseback," one of 
the most discussed pictures of the day. 

James Cruze directed it — he is also 
responsible for "The Covered Wagon." 
The "Beggar on Horseback" is the 
story of a nightmare, and has been pro- 
duced at tremendous expense. 

The cast includes Edward Everett 
Horton, Esther Ralston, Erwin Con- 
nelly. James Mason, Gertrude Short 
and Ethel Wales. 

The usual short reels and Max 
Dolin's music will complete the bill. 



Loew's Warfield 

A most intensely dramatic story 
called "Sun-Up" opens at the Warfield 
today. It is a story of the North Caro- 
lina mountains, and was written by 
Lulu Vollmer, who has passed much 
time among the hardy denizens of 
these hills, thus acquiring an intimate 
knowledge of their language and 
habits. These form the background 
against which the pathetic story of 
maternal love, of high, but misguided 
purpose, stand out in high relief. 

The title. "Sun-Up" symbolizes the 
rising sun of intelligence, which is 
brought into this community with the 
return of the son, Rufe from the war. 

Lucille La Verne plays the WuImw 
Nagle, making every dramatic moment 
count. Others in the cast are Conrad 
Nagel, Pauline Starke and others. 

Lipschultz and his Music Masters 
and Fanchon and Marco's "Ideas" 
round out the well-balanced hill. 



August 29, 1925 

Amusements 



XKXT WBEK 



ALEXANDRIA , 

_ . > Pictures 

Gc»ry and 18th ( 


ALCAZAR | Henry Duffy Players 
O'Parrell nr. Powell J "Little Old New York" 


CALIFORNIA J "Beggar on 
ith and Market ( Horseback" 


CAMEO 1 House Peters 
!>:«! Market St. "Headwinds" 


M«klt»a E ..,., J Carter ' The Ma 9 icia " 


CASINO 1 

Mimon and Ellis J Pictures 


CASTRO 1 

430 ca.tro St. J Pictures 


COLISEUM | 

Clement nnd 0th J Pictures 


CURRAN 1 

r "No, No, Nanette" 
Geary nr. Mason \ ' 


EGYPTIAN ( Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE } Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor f Pictures 


GRANADA \ p|ctures 

10(18 Market St. J 


HAIGHT I Pictures 
Haigrht at Cole ) 


IMPERIAL | Douglas Fairbanks 
1077 Market St. f "Don Q, Son of Zorro" 


LOEWS WARFIELD } 

OSS Market St. J "Sun-Up' 


MAJESTIC 1 

Mission between ( Pictures 

20th nnd 21st ) 


METROPOLITAN ( 

.„„ „ . „ r Pictures 

J0..r, 1 in, ,ii St. ) 


NEW FILLMORE ) 

1320 Fillmore D . , 

Pictures 
NEW MISSION 1 

2660 Mission ) 


ORPHEUM 1 

OParrell and Powell J Vaudeville 


PANTAGES J ,, , .,, 
„,,,., f Vaudeville 

.Market at Mason J 


POMPEII 1 Pictures 

\esct to Granada \ 


PORTOLA 1 

770 Market J Pictures 


PRESIDENT J 

Market « McAllister ] " The Best People" 


ROYAL | 

1530 Polk St. ( Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS 1 ,,_. 

nits Market | Tne lron Horse' 


SUTTER | 

sniier and steiner \ Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 1 „„, . „ 
) "Slander" 
O'Fnrrell nr. Powell ( 


WILKES ) „,„,... „ 

, „ I "White Cargo" 
Geary nnd Mnsou ( 


WIGWAM J 

Mission and 22d \ Pictures 


SEPT. 5-6-7 \ R ngling Circus 



SAX FRANCISO i NEWS LETTER 

Capitol 

Carter, the Great, made his first ap- 
pearance in San Francisco last Sun- 
day evening after his fifth triumphal 
tour around the world, with his com- 
pany who mystify in a unique presen- 
tation of latter-day miracles, discov- 
eries and innovations of science, remi- 
niscent of the tales of the Arabian 
Nights. 

Some of the numbers on his program 
are Flyto, Evelyn Maxwell, the mind 
reader ; a Night in China, an Oriental 
Seance; the Magician's Incubator, 
demonstrating existence in the fourth 
dimension ; sawing a live woman in 
halves, and the spectacular illusion 
The Lion's Bride, in which a large Nu- 
bian lion participates. 

* * * 
Curran 

Monday marks the beginning of the 
ninth week at the Curran Theater of 
Edward D. Smith's clever musical 
comedy, "No, No, Nanette." Taylor 
Holmes takes the part of the rich Bible 
manufacturer who has too many 
sweethearts. They are from all parts 
of the country and when they meet 
at the millionaire's cottage in Atlantic 
City, the fun begins. 

Nancy Welford. the petite little 
dancer, has won the hearts of San 
Francisco theater goers, and capacity 
audiences are the rule at this theater. 
There is a fine chorus, and a beautiful 
musical score. 

* * * 

Wilkes 

"White Cargo," Leon Gordon's grip- 
ping and dynamic drama of love, hate, 
lust and tragedy enters the third week 
of its present engagement at the 
Wilkes Theater, where it has estab- 
lished such a triumphant record. 

The cast now interpreting the play 
is the same one which played in Los 
Angeles for eight weeks, and it is re- 
peating its great success here. The 
cast includes Arthur Clayton, Marcela 
Zabala, Leonard Mudic. AI Cunning- 
ham, Adolf Milar, Harold Howard, F. 
Finch-Smiles. Robert Morse and 
George C. Pearce. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

A San Francisco girl, Frances 
Teague. plays one of the important 
rules in "The Iron Horse," now play- 
ing at the St. Francis Theater. 

When the picture was being made 
on the Nevada desert. Miss Teague. ac- 
companied by her father, W. E. 
Teague. an official of the Southern Pa- 
cific railroad, went to see the filming 
of the picture. While the company 
were shooting a scene in which track 
layers were driving spikes in a terrific 
storm, Miss Teague told Director Ford 
of her grandfather's experiences when 



the first transcontinental railroad was 
being built. He asked her if she wanted 
a part, and of course she did, and that 
is how another girl from San Fran- 
cisco joined the ranks of the movie 
actors. 

George O'Brien, son of Chief of Po- 
lice Daniel J. O'Brien is also featured 
in this picture. 

* * * 
Union Square 

"Slander" with ten principals and 
a cast of 500 players, opens its San 
Francisco premiere at the Union 
Square Saturday, this marks the re- 
turn to the screen of Ethel Clayton, 
who is supported by Cullen Landis, 
Barbara Bedford and Sam de Grasse. 




11 the way 

Through the 
Arizona, New Mexico 
and Colorado Rockies. 
You are a mile or more 
up in the sky most of 
the way. 

FRED HARVEY 
Dining Car or Station 
Hotel meal service. 

daily back East 

ursions 

— to principal points in 
United States and Canada 
at reduced round trip fares. 

See Grand Canyon Na- 
tional Park en route. 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 

601 Market Street, and 

Market Street Ferry Station 

Telephone Sutter 7600 

SAN FRANCISCO 




Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On Ihe Edge of (he Berkeley If III. 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty -eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Enthusiasm Keynote 
of Jubilee Success 

JUBILEE colors, jubilee buttons, glistening make-believe 
jewels, all manner of red and green and yellow acces- 
sories, are awaiting now our Diamond Jubilee. 

Banners and pennants, flying streamers, lights which re- 
flects the splendors of Spain, colors of radiant hues are to 
be found everywhere, making a fiesta of every street and 
avenue and telling in a significant and convincing way, that 
our celebration is at hand. 

There is something, however, which the people them- 
selves are going to supply which will be the real propelling 
power, making for unprecedented success. It is — enthu- 
siasm. 

While no ceremony will herald the exact time when the 
outburst is to come, this spontaneous human combustion 
will surely explode ; and, when it does, it is going to be the 
biggest force of our Jubilee festivities. 

Enthusiasm is a virtue which runs nigh to the point of 
vigorous vice. It stops at nothing — good. It is California's 
heritage. It is typical of this Golden State. Of all the glit- 
tering wealth of things which our progenitors have handed 
down to us, none excels that overflow of good spirits which 
we dignify by the term : enthusiasm. 

Wait 'til the time comes, and you'll find it traversing our 
streets and thoroughfares as positively as our scheduled pa- 
rades. 

Watch for its pending storm, for we always have a deluge 
— and every one participates in the down-pour, getting into 
it witli eagerness and zeal and spreading it as far as the 
length and breadth of our great commonwealth. California 
was blessed with many super-things, but that one gift of 
enthusiasm is enough to keep our visitors around to watch 
us at play. We are unaware of this spontaneous enthusiasm 
— that's why it has so much influence and weight. 

Enthusiasm — why that's what is going to make the Dia- 
mond Jubilee a success beyond the scope of human reckon- 
ings. 

* * * 

Eight Colorful Days Reviewing 
Romantic California History 

Eight colorful days reviewing California's romantic his- 
tory — that's what the handsome programs announce. Sep- 
tember 5 to 12, and every day filled full with romance and 
society's offerings. 

This fiesta will revive renewed interest in the classic lore 
of Bret Harte. Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, 
Joaquin Miller, Jack London and many more. Thousands 
of tourists are coming to our Diamond Jubilee just to see 
the regions where the works of these literary men had their 
premiere. 

Every section of the state will contribute to the telling of 
California's wondrous story. Nearly one hundred commu- 
nities, ranging all the way from the Mexican border line to 
the Oregon boundary, have announced their entertainment 
plans with outdoor pageants, fiestas and Spanish festivities, 
all culminating in the San Francisco Diamond Jubilee. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

0A0 nuak Street. Between Powell and Stoekfon. San FraneUcn I 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



Distinguished Womans' Auxiliary of 
the Society of California Pioneers 

One of the most distinguished groups of California's rep- 
resentative women is the Womans' Auxiliary of the Society 
of California Pioneers, which has a history quite unlike that 
of any other California society. 

In the first place this auxiliary of women, from the first 
families of the state, has for its object the promotion of in- 
terest in California history; to collect facts pertaining to the 
early settlement of the state; to form a library and a mu- 
seum consisting of relics and historical objects and to create 
a feeling of unity among members. 

But it is not only upon this status that the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Society of California Pioneers represents 
an interesting and unusual group, it is because of its lineal 
specifications. 

Mrs. John H. Jewett, the organizer and first president, 
has written a comprehensive outline of auxiliary history, 
parts of which are quoted below : 

"It was in the year of 1X98, when not only San Francisco, 
but the whole state, was alive and enthusiastic in prepara- 
tion for a grand celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of 
the discovery of gold in California, the Golden Jubilee," 
stated Mrs. Jewett. "The pioneers of those Golden Days, 
the Argonauts of 'forty-nine,' were alert to the importance 
of the celebration ; the daily newspapers were largely taken 
up with ideas, suggestions and plans as to how the Tubilee 
was to be carried out by the Society of California Pioneers 
and the Native Sons." 

Mrs. Jewett then went on to say how one day after read- 
ing glowing articles about the reception and activities of the 
Pioneer Society of which her husband was then president, 
that she read aloud to her husband a query printed in one 
of the newspaper articles: "Where do the wives and the 
daughters come in:" 

"Mr. Jewett made no remarks in reply to the question. 
and the subject was dropped," continues Mrs. Jewett. "I 
thought nothing more about the incident until a few days 
later when I was both surprised and pleased to receive a 
communication from the Board of Directors of the Society 
of California Pioneers." This communication addressed to 
Mrs. Jewett. was dated January 31. 1898, and read like this: 
"I have the honor of advising you that at the monthly meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the Society of California 
Pioneers, held on Saturday, January 29, the sum of six 
hundred dollars was appropriated for the purpose of allow- 
ing the ladies of the society to hold a reception and invite 
the widows and daughters of deceased members to be pres- 
ent, the ladies to take entire charge of it. 

"It was the expressed wish of the board that it should 
be given under your supervision. If my services can be of 
any use to you. it will afford me much pleasure to receive 
your commands. 

(Signed) J. I. SPEAR, Secretary." 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



August 29, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER 



Act of Chivalry 

It was upon this act of chivalry that the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the Society of Califor- 
nia Pioneers was founded; for from this re- 
ception, for which the Pioneers so generously 
contributed their funds, grew the auxiliary of 
prominent women whose names are now in- 
scribed upon its roster. 

Five thousand invitations were sent out by 
these women for the Pioneer's reception. 

Prominent among those directing this re- 
ception were Mrs. Louis Sloss, Mrs. Henry L. 
Dodge, Mrs. Aylett Cotton, Mrs. Heber N. 
Tilden, Mrs. Peer Tiffany, Mrs. Niles Searles 
and Miss O'Callaghan. 

According* to MJrs. Jewett's official report, 
it was following the discovery of the picture 
of James King, which hung on the walls of 
the art gallery, that his daughter, Mrs. Edward 
Dutton, who saw it there for the first time, dis- 
cussed with Mrs. Jewett the plan of forming 
an organization of women who should be in- 
terested in all the affairs of the Society of 
California Pioneers. 

The idea took root and thrived. At a gathering of women, 
over which Mrs. George J. Bucknall presided some time 
later, the idea was advanced, and the plan laid before the 
Pioneers. Again the chivalry of these California men as- 
serted itself and they welcomed the formation of a Woman's 
Auxiliary to their Society. Mrs. John H. Jewett, the 
founder, was elected the first president, in the year 1901, 

retaining her office for two years. 
* * # 

Founders Prominent 

Founders of the Woman's Auxiliary were Mrs. Wash- 
ington Ayer, Mrs. George J. Bucknall, Mrs. James M. 
Goewey, Mrs. Samuel W. Holladay, Mrs. John H. Jewett, 
Mrs. James Louis Martel, Mrs. James Neall, Miss Margaret 
O'Callaghan, Isabel Lowry Soule, Mrs. Peer Tiffany. 

Mrs. John H. Jewett, the first president, presided from 
1901 to '03; other presidents were Mrs. John M. Burnett, 
Mrs. George Bucknall, Mrs. J. J. Brice, Mrs. Charles J. 
Deering, Mrs. Margaret M. Deane, Mrs. Aylett R. Cotton. 
Mrs. Timothy Guy Phelps, Mrs. Joseph Moody, Mrs. James 
Heron, Mrs. Aurelius Buckingham, Mrs. Lewis V. llcnt- 
rich, and Mrs. Davis Louderback. 
Present Officers * * * 

Officers of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Society of 
California Pioneers today emulate the high standards and 
the precepts of their illustrious forebears, and the Aux- 
iliary stands, during this seventy-fifth anniversary, the Dia- 
mond Jubilee of California's admission as a state, as 
one of the most prominent and honored of women's organi- 
zations on the Pacific Coast. 

Mrs. Davis Louderback, widow of the late Judge Louder- 
back, who has just recently been re-elected to the presi- 
dency for a second term, is from one of San Francisco's 
most prominent and honored families. Quiet and m 
her demeanor is so finely feminine and so gently womanly, 
that they who are privileged to he associated with her. are 
favored indeed. Mrs. Louderback has an executive stafl 
representing families distinguished for their part as builders 
of the state and the city in which they live. 

Mrs. Joseph Moody is first vice president; Mrs. Henry 
\\ . Seale. is second vice-president; Mrs. Fowler Mallett, 

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250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



third vice-president; Miss Helen Van Winkle, 
fourth vice-president; Mrs. O. B. Martin, fifth 
vice-president; Miss Frances M. Molera, re- 
cording secretary; Mrs. Helen K. F. Walker, 
treasurer; Miss L. M. Hathaway, correspond- 
ing secretary; Mrs. P. C Hale, historian; Mrs. 
Dennis Mahoney, librarian. 

Directors are: Mesdames James M. Mbrton, 
Albert E. Gillespie, J. J. O'Farrell, Richard 
Wallace, A. K. Theobald and J. J. Brice. 

Meetings of the Woman's Auxiliary are held 
in the lovely grey room of the Fairmont Hotel, 
where interesting sessions, relative to the his- 
tory of California, are held with Mrs. Davis 
Louderback presiding, and the women whose 
interest has made the organization foremost 
in our notable and historical events. The 
Woman's Auxiliary is participating in the 
events of the Diamond Jubilee and will by vir- 
tue of their heritage, be leading California 
women during the memorable celebration. 

The first meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
will be held Saturday, September 12, when a 
Jubilee luncheon will be held in the grey room 
of the Fairmont Hotel, Mrs. Davis Louderback presiding. 

At Del Monte 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Herrscher have been spending 
the week-end at Del Monte with Mrs. Julie Grinbaum, aunt 
of Mrs. Herrscher. Motor trips and luncheons, teas and 
dinner parties at the famous Del Monte have been part of 
their pleasures. Mr: and Mrs. Herrscher recently returned 
from Europe where they visited all the large cities of the 
continent. Their sojourn in Europe this time followed a 
number of preceding tours abroad. Mrs. Herrscher se- 
cured many beautiful things for their new home while 
abroad. * * * 

The Arts and Crafts League 

Mrs. Pietro Carolina will give the regular musical dansant 
of the Arts and Crafts League at Sequoia Hall, 1725 Wash- 
ington Street, this Saturday evening, the 29th. 

^mong those who are expected to be present, will be: 

Commander and Mrs. De Witt Blainer. Commander and 
Mrs. Joseph Neilson, Captain and Mrs. Eastwood, Captain 
Migaard, anil other officers and wives in the army. Mrs. 
Caronna makes a very gracious hostess, and one seldom sees 
a "wall flower" at these very charming monthly dances, 
gn en under the auspices of this league of artists. 

* * * 
Brilliant Ball 

"El Baile del Cerro" the official ball of the Diamond 
Jubilee celebration, which takes place Thursday night, Sep- 
tember 10. on Nob Hill at the Fairmont Hotel, will revive 
the glittering splendor of society's magnificent events. 

limes for the ball are to be typically Californian. 
Spanish colorings, the wide hoop skirt, modes of many years 
ago, will vie for favor among the society folks who are 
centering into the brilliant plans with concerted interest. 

Some of the historical characterizations of pioneer liter- 
ary life will be in evidence, including Bret Harte celebrities 
and the people of his time. This gala event promises to 
transcend anything which has been given within the social 
whirl for many a day and while the committees directing 
"The Ball on the Hill" are acceding to the old traditions 
i Continued on Page lot 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN. Agua Caliente. Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2 l ). 1925 



J^PcL 



"&J&J&* 



<*%&<&• 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



««ays* 



«eJ£ 



c/3* 




N, 



EVER in the history of golf at the Olym- 
pic Club's course at Lakeside has there 
been such a successful woman's championship 
golf tournament held, as the one that has just 
closed, in which Mrs. Louis Bacigalupi, wife 
of that prominent medico, won from Mrs. 
Harding Brann on the seventeeth green. 
From the moment the tournament opened, 
on Monday, until it closed the following Friday, there were 
no end of records and surprises. 

Mrs. Bacigalupi opened the proceedings by winning the 
medal round with a card of 96, being the only woman to 
break the century mark ; but later in the tournament she 
cut four strokes off that score in her match with Mrs. Wil- 
liam Gilmour. 

There was one thing that Mrs. Baci- 
galupi taught us, and that was, that 
she never gives up, no matter what 
kind of a lead her opponent has over 
her. 

Mrs. Bacigalupi is a cool and col- 
lected golfer who knows every angle 
of the game, studies every shot and 
plays it like a veteran. 

A true example of this she demon- 
strated while playing against Mrs. Gil- 
mour when she only had one bad hole 
out of the eighteen and that was the 
eigh eenth where she got in a peck of 
trouble. 

Outside of that, this little champion 
played phenominal golf and Mrs. Gil- 
mour wasn't very far behind, because 
Mrs. Bacigalupi had to shoot a par five 
on the nineteenth hole to win the 
match. 

The final match between Mrs. Baci- 
galupi and Mrs. Brann was a real test 
of skill. 

Mrs. Brann had sprung the surprise of the tournament 
when she won a clever match against Mrs. J. H. McClel- 
land, champion of 1923-24, and was also called forth to 
exert her best efforts against Mrs. George Mullen, who I 
may state, played the best golf of her career; so when these 
two golfing stars set out on their last lap of play it looked 
like a 50-50 proposition. 

They golfed as no other women at Lakeside had ever 
done before; first one and then the other took the lead and 
many times it looked as if Mrs. Brann had the title within 
her grip, only to lose it again by the uncanny way in which 
the new champion played. 

Mrs. Bacigalupi has proved that she has no fear whilst 
under fire and that is what makes a champion golfer. 

By winning the Olympic Club's championship, Mrs. Baci- 
galupi has two titles to her credit, having won the 72 hole 
championship at Lake Merced. 

* * * 

Miss Sheehan Stars 

Miss Romie Sheehan was the star in the second flight. 
This young lady only took up golf about a year ago and 
this was her first tournament of importance and the way 
she acquitted herself was nothing short of a miracle, for 
she simply walked away with the second flight. 
__ Mrs. S. Lisberger won the third flight, whilst Mrs. E 
Graham won the third flight. 



To Mrs. George 




i li jirnp 



M. 



Mrs. Phil Wand captured the consolation prize, while 
Mrs. Harding Brann won the putting contest with the best 
card of the whole tournament. 

During the five days of play there were several extra 
In ile matches decided. Mrs. Brann won on the 19th from 
Mrs. J. M. McClelland. Mrs. Bacigalupi won from Mrs. 
Gilmour at the 19th. Mrs. E. J. Eggleston also won from 
Mrs. W. G. Wood at the 19th, while Mrs. Karl Anderson 
was the marathon golfer, defeating Mrs. A. F. Lausen at the 
twenty-second. 

Mrs. Charles Ash won from Mrs. W. B. Wentz at the 
20th, which proves what wonderful work the handicap- 
pers had done. 

\cton, the acting captain, and Mrs. 
(ieorge Mullen goes all the praise for 
pulling off such a successful tourna- 
ment. 

Everything worked like clockwork, 
with perfect weather, especially on the 
last day. 

Kenneth McLeod, the Club's man- 
ager, did his part in his customary 
manner when he catered so masterfully 
to the fastidious tastes of the women. 

All. without exception, were de- 
lighted with the delicious buffet lunch, 

which Monte set before them. 
* * * 

McHugh Wins President's Cup 

John J. McHugh, the Olympic Club's 
champion golfer and former State and 
Northern California champion, added 
another title to his long list of victories 
when he won William F. Humphrey's 
president's cup at Lakeside last Sun- 
day, setting a course record of 69 in his 
final match with Stanton Haight, form- 
er captain of California University golf team. Both boys 
played remarkable golf all through the tournament ; Mc- 
Hugh in particular, as he had a 72 in the qualifying round, 
finishing one stroke behind George Ritchie, the medalist. 
Ritchie had two 74's while McHugh had 77-72. 

From there on McHugh had it much his own way with 
the exception of when he met Francis Murphy, who took 
him to the ISth hole, where he won one up. With the two 
Ritchie boys, George and "Babe" out of the running, Mc- 
Hugh had clear sailing. George was unexpectedly beaten 
by Howard W'eider. a very promising golfer, while "Babe" 
Ritchie fell a victim of the cunning of George Mullen. 

W'eider met his Waterloo at the hands of Dudley Sales, 
while Mullen had to acknowdedge defeat of the new cham- 
pion. 

The tournament was robbed of a little of its interest 
by the absence of Eddie Twiggs, one of the star golfers 
of the club, but outside of that, with the possible exception 
that Judge T. I. Fitzpatrick was away on his vacation and 
did not participate, all the regulars were on the job, includ- 
ing our worthy secretary, Frank Foran, the winner of the 
last big tournament held at Lakeside. 



BACIGALUPI 
Iter of the Olympl 



August 29, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



1! 




THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women s organizations. 




JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

Predictions are being made that the Dia- 
mond Jubilee will bring together in San 
Francisco the largest gathering of Native 
Sons and Native Daughters of the Golden 
West ever before assembled. 

Delegates from all parts of the State num- 
bering into the thousands are planning to 
participate in the Jubilee events and will 
be a glorious part of the parade. Magni- 
ficent floats, handsome costuming, spectacu- 
lar are some of the things which many parlors of both organ- 
izations have arranged. There is no doubt but that the Na- 
tive Sons and the Native Daughters will claim unprece- 
dented applause and ovation from the public in general 
as well as arouse the admiration of all patriotic organiza- 
tions from the entire nation. 

Angelo J. Rossi and his committees are working system- 
atically and diligently for the splendid success of the cele- 
bration. In one of their most recent announcements comes 
the word that Twin Peaks will be an imposing signal tower 
with its two flags flying from forty-five foot poles erected 
on the crest of the Peaks. On one peak will be the Stars 
and Stripes ; on the other, the Bear Flag of California. 
Mount Tamalpais will have beacon fires burning from its 
summit during the celebration. 

The magnificent "Arch of Diamonds," El Arco de Bril- 
liantes, designed by D'Arcy Ryan, in the Civic Center which 
was formally dedicated with auspicious ceremony, will pre- 
sent the one outstanding scene of splendor. It is an- 
nounced that the arch is studded with 75,000 jewels, or 1,000 
jewels for each year of California's statehood. 

Our own Market Street, the main artery to our city's 
thoroughfares, is already dressed-up for the great cele- 
bration and the blaze of lights lining its border-lines has 
converted the place into a veritable fairyland. The first 
impression of "Jubilee" greets the visitor at the foot of 
Market street in terms of significant glorification. 

* * * 

Opera Admission Tax 
Waived in San Francisco 

Robert I. Bently, president of the San Francisco Opera 
Association, has given out the information that the tax on 
opera admission lias been waived. Through the efforts 
of Mayor James Rolph, Jr., a special ruling has been se- 
cured from the Commissioner of Internal Revenue at Wash- 
ington, D. C, waiving the government's tax on opera ad- 
missions. 

Mayor Rolph in his [ilea set forth the fact that the Son 
Francisco ( Ipera Company is a non-profit organi; 
and that its performances are given for the cultured and 
educational advantages of the \\ est. Patrons of the opera 
will save approximately $15,000. according to those in- 
formed. 

* * * 

Photographers' Convention 

San Francisco has been the setting for one convention 
liter another. In fact, there is scarcely a week that some 
representative group does not gather in our city for con- 
vention procedure and deliberation. 

(Continued on Page 15> 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

Louise Moran Donnelly, historian of the Daughters of 
California Pioneers, has compiled an interesting outline of 
the activities of her organization which is of general appeal. 

Quoting from Mrs. Donnelly, one of the most enthusi- 
astic women and best informed leaders of the state, we con- 
sider her authentic statements most timely and appropriate 
as a forerunner of our Jubilee. 

"In fulfilling the purpose of the organization," writes 
Louise Moran Donnelly, "The Daughters of California 
Pioneers have been on the alert to affiliate with every move- 
ment that had for its incentive the perpetuation of the 
glorious achievements of the renowned pioneers. 

"Historic spots have been suitably marked and historical 
relics have been collected and placed in the Pioneer Room 
founded by the Society in the De Young Memorial Mu- 
seum. A study has been made of Spanish names and their 
significance as applied to objects, and places in California. 

"An exhaustive study has been made of Spanish and other 
types of architecture of the pioneer period and the influ- 
ence manifested in the present-day architecture." 

She refers with keen insight to the commercial values, 
trades, amusements and social activities, with attention 
given to the study of the Missions and other places of his- 
toric interest. One of the notable features of their pro- 
grams, to which the historian points with pride, was 
"Pioneer Art" by Captain Robert Fletcher. She also names 
as a distinctive day the address given by Mrs. Frederick 
H. Colbtlrn on "The Geology of California, and "California 
in the Making." by Robert E. Cowan ; "Art" by Aaron Alt- 
man ; "Romances of California" with George H. Baron, the 
speaker, and "Pioneer Travelogue" H. L. Van Winkle's dis- 
course. 

Laura Bride Powers gave a lecture on "California Mis- 
-i'nis" at one of their meeting 

* * * 
Commemorative Acts 

In her historical review Mrs. Donnelly calls attention 
to the Sequoia, commemorative of the fortitude displayed 
by the Pioneers in founding the State of California, which 
was planted in the historic grove in Golden Gate Park un- 
der the personal supervision of the Daughters of California 
Pioneers, and which is marked with a bronze tablet. 

Exhibits to the number of one hundred and fifty have 
been placed in the De Young Memorial Museum, contri- 
buted from the collections of Jacob P. Leese. Almarin B. 
Paul and members of the Daughters of California Pioneers. 

"The society possesses two gavels of historical import- 
ance." asserts Mrs. Donnelly. "One was made from a piece 
of wood from Sutter's Fort and hewn in the year 1843; the 
other was made from one of the ties used in railroad con- 
struction work in the early development of the Panama 
Canal. 

"In 1903 when the late President Roosevelt visited our 
shores, he said in one of his addresses: 'I have been im- 
pressed bv the feeling which makes the people of this state 
wish to preserve the ancient landmarks — landmarks of 
mankind — landmarks of nature, that have made them de- 
sirous of keeping alive the memory of the great deeds and 
greater doers who have given the state to the Uni 



12 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 29, 1925 



50 CENTS PER COPY 
Postage, U. S., 10 Cents. Canada and Foreign, 20 Cents 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Enclosed $ for which please send to my 

address copies of DIAMOND JUBILEE 

EDITION OF SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



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Also mail copies direct to the following : 

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Thi 



Diamond Jubilee 

Edition 

of the 

San Francisco 
News Letter 

will be published 

September 5, 1925 



112 PAGES 

\\"\U Be Devoted to an Historical Review of 
the Story of California. It Will Be Illustrated 
by the Finest Collection of Old Photographs 
in Existence, Depicting Dramatic Incidents 
During the Pony Express and Vigilantes Days, 
Including a Period From 1837 to 1925. 



Ord 



er copies now 



50c per copy 

Postage, U. S., 10c 

Postage, Foreign, 20c 



{Our (tOrh Anniversary Number, Published in 1916, which con- 
tained a number of engravings that will be re-published in the 
Diamond Jubilee Edition, has had a ready sale at $10.00 per copy 
during the last four years.) 



August 29, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

The Mother Lode Highway 

THE old mining camps of the 
"Mother Lode" country may be 
reached by various paved roads lead- 
ing from valley points, but to get the 
atmosphere of the "Days of '49" and 
to visit all but forgotten "towns" of 
those days, one should traverse the 
"Mother Lode Road." It is not a road 
to be negotiated by a novice at driving, 
but for one accustomed to mountain 
driving (and most of those interested 
in visiting such places are so accus- 
tomed) it offers a wonderful field of 
mining lore; literary landmarks and 
grand scenic effects. 

Mariposa, at the south end, is at 
present a sleepy old town which 
"points with pride" to one of itsi old 
iron shuttered buildings, at one time 
General Fremont's office. This is near 
the southern end of General Fremont's 
grant of 44,444 acres, a long narrow 
strip extending along the Mother Lode. 
Another year and this town will be 
on the main road to Yosemite Park. 
This change will benefit the town fi- 
nancially but much of its charm will 
be lost. 

Going north we come next to Mt. 
Bullion, from which point, a side trip 
should be made to Hornitos, 13 miles 
west over a good dirt road. This is 
one of the oldest and most interesting 
of the camps. 

Returning to Mt. Bullion and turn- 



Look for the 
GREEN and 
WHITE 
SIGN 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

ing north, we pass Mt. Ophir, where 
was located the first mint in Califor- 
nia where were coined the $50 gold 
slugs. 

Bear Valley, near which was Gen- 
eral Fremont's residence, contains 
many old buildings of interest, among 
them being the Fremont Company 
store and the Oso House, a hostelry 
famous in early days. 

Shortly after leaving Bear Valley 
the road descends a long and pic- 
turesque grade, crossing the Merced 
River at Bagby and immediately be- 
gins a seven-mile climb over the ridge 
to Coulterville. M.ost of this latter 
town has been destroyed by fire, but 
there still remain a few old buildings 
and a fatherly old oak from the limbs 
of which were hanged miscreants, in 
the days of its prosperity. 

Jacksonville is located on the Big- 
Oak Flat road to Yosemite and has 
very little remaining of mining times. 
From here one has a choice of two 
good roads to Jamestown; one lead- 
ing through Chinese Camp and the 
other through Stent and Quartz. So- 
nora has escaped the fate of so many 
of the mining camps and is now a 
thriving community, but with much 
of the old "atmosphere" left in the 
shape of old buildings. 

Between Sonora and San Andreas 
are Tuttletown, Melones, Carson Hill. 
Angels Camp and Fourth Crossing, all 
of which contributed their share of 
gold, 

San Andreas, Mokelumne Hill. Jack- 
son, Martel, Sutter Creek, Amador, 
Drytown, Plymouth, Nashville and El 
Dorado were all famous in their time. 
and a few Irave survived and are now 
prospering. 

Placerville, the "Ilangtown" of old, 
is on one of the main routes to Lake 
Tahoe and is thus visited by many in 
the course of a touring season. From 
there one goes over the hills to Col- 
oma, where Marshall discovered the 
lump of yellow metal, the news of 
which discovery set the world afire, 
and caused the influx which raised Cali- 
fornia from comparative obscurity to 
statehood within such a short space of 
time. 

From this point one proceeds to Au- 
burn, through Pilot Hill and Cool. 
From here on the road is much better 
and leads through i"irass Valley, Ne- 
vada City, North San Juan, Campton- 
ville, Downieville to Sierra City, which 
is the northern end of the "Mother 
Lode Road." 

(Continued on Page 16) 



13 



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This means that you 
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are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
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The Nicest Business 
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GENERAL 

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Meet Your 
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TH E United States is the largest coal producers in the 
world and has over one-half of the underground supply 
of the world. There has been a big increase in American 
coal export in the last few years which is playing havoc 
with the British trade in coal, the exports of which how- 
ever continue to be about twice the amount of the exports 
from this country. 

* * * 

—Talking about coal, there is a curious example of the 
war in which economic supply and demand work, in the 
fact that we ship large quantities of coal to Canada. Now 
Canada has vast underground supplies of coal, which are 
none to accessible because of the labor cost. Hence we ex- 
ported to Canada eleven million tons of coal in 1924. 

* * * 

Considering the fact, that there is a coal strike pending 

in this country, it may be interesting to remember that the 
largest part of our coal exports are bituminous coal, 15 mil- 
lion tons of it in 1924, compared with 3]/ 2 million of anthra- 
cite. We produce about 438 million tons of bituminous coal 
and 82 million tons of anthracite. Two-thirds of the anthra- 
cite is used for domestic heatins; and only one-sixth of the 
bituminous, the rest being used for industry and transporta- 
tion. 

* * * 

The Southern Pacific has bored a tunned through 10,- 

322 feet of solid granite under the Sierras. The tunned is 
the longest in the Southern Pacific system, exceeded in 
length by but two others in the whole country. The longest 
railway tunned in the world is that of Mt. St Gothard with 
a length of 49,212 feet. 

* * * 

— With a total of 1094 ships arriving and departing from 
this port in July, there is a net tonnage of 2,529,889 tons as 
compared with the corresponding month of last year. Ship- 
ping is, therefore, well maintaining its position in the eco- 
nomics of San Francisco. 

* * * 

— The Supreme Court of Illinois has held that an agree- 
ment to employ none but union men in the erection of school 
buildings for the municipality is void, as being a discrimi- 
nation between different classes of citizens and tending to 
restrict competition and increase the cost of work. 



— As a contradiction to much of the lugubrious complaint 
about the dullness of trade, it may be stated that sales at de- 
partment stores in this city were more than 2 per cent larger 
than during the last half of 1924 and buying at the grocery, 
drug, five and ten-cent and music chain stores, was more 
than 9 per cent greater than last year. 

* * * 

— San Francisco ranked fifth among the branch offices of 
the Travellers for volume of new paid life insurance, pro- 
duced in the first six months of 1925. San Francisco office 
in the same company was third in the country for new paid 
accident and health premiums. 

* * * 

— The advent of union labor into life insurance will be 
marked by Union Labor Life on January 1st. 1926, when the 
first policies will be issued. Headquarters will be in Wis- 
consin. 

* * * 

— Agents, brokers and adjusters in California who fail to 
secure licenses before October 1st, are subject to prosecu- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been Increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

S26 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees* Pension Fu id 479,081 .25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7tli Ave. 

IIA1CHT STREET BRANCH Haisht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
I'll Id 1 |> < upllnl '•JlP.nim.lMHl *20,0<>0.000 llenrrvr I'mill 

All Kinda of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
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tirancft Office Pacific Coast Department 
VValtlr W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
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You repay us by small monthly install- 
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YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal Phone Hemlock 1082 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Maallfactarera of 

RIVETED STEEI. PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS, FI.I'MES. 

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208 Crocker Building (Oppnsitp Palace llnipli San FVanclscc , 
Phone Kearnv SP-1 



August 29, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from Page 11) 

Now comes the Pacific International Photographers' As- 
sociation which will hold its convention at the Fairmont 
Hotel, September 2 to 5, with official delegates from all 
parts of the country. According to authentic announce- 
ment, there will be at least 1,000 photographers in attend- 
ance, and this number does not include the wives and other 
members of their families. 

O. C. Conkling of St. Louis, photographer of children, will 
be one of the speakers. In addition to his address he will 
demonstrate his methods of conducting a model studio. 
E. Perry Evans of Portland, Oregon, will be another prom- 
inent photographer at the convention. Miss Ida M. Reed, 
of San Francisco, Secretary of the association, has charge 
of the details for this event. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 



in appointments, there will be evidenced the best which 
present-day modes have to give, in addition. 

Sponsors for this brilliant ball include a list of partons 
and patronesses which represent leading families of the 
bay-cities and the peninsula set. They are headed by Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Charles P. Menoher; Messers and Mesdames 
Rudolph Spreckels, Robert Watt Miller, August Taylor, 
Charles McCormick, Stewart Lowery, George Hearst, Rob- 
ert Hayes Smith, Roger Lapham, Frederick McNear, Ed- 
munds Lyman. 

The gold ball room of the Fairmont Hotel and the ter- 
race room are to be utilized in staging the ball. In the 
main ballroom the settings will be those of a gorgeous 
Spanish court with all the pomp of regal appointments. 
Old-time dance hall effects will be used for the timely 
scheme of the "days of '49" in the terrace room with set- 
tings in keeping with the historical events which brought 
the rush of gold-seekers to the state. 

* * # 

Soroptimist Club 

The Soroptimist Club, of San Francisco, a club of business 
and professional women devoted to the principles of True 
Americanism — to the betterment of Civic conditions — to tit 
development of efficient service and usefulness to society, and 
to the furtherance of fraternal helpfulness are keenly an 1 
vitally interested in the progress of the plans for California's 
Jubilee celebration, and stand really to do their hi: for its sure 
and mighty success. 

A cordial invitation is cxtcn 'e 1 to all visiting Sorop imists 
from other cities in the city Diamond Jubilee week to join 
the San Francisco Soroptimists in the'r Monday luncheons 
a' the St. Francis Hotel on the mezzanine floor, where they 
will be proud to demons'. rate .San Francisco's hospitality. 

* * * 

Queen Proposed 

It has been proposed that Mrs. Milo Abercrombie, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. George McGowan, be nominated as candidate for 
queen of the Diamond Jubilee celebration. 



The great detective stood before the rich merchant, wait- 
ing for his instructions. "It's this way," began the mer- 
chant. "I have been robbed of hundreds of dollars. A 
rascal has gone about the country, pretending to be a col- 
lector of curs. lie has simply coined money. Why. in 
the week he has collected more than all our travelers put 
together. He must be found as quickly as possible. Spare 
no expense." 

"Right." said the detective, "within a week he will be 
in prison." 

"Prison!" cried the merchant. "Why. man, I don't want 
him arrested: I want to employ him." — Selected. 



"Can any one," asked the teacher, "give me a sentence using 
the word 'disarrange'?" 

The first three pupils balked. Finally, her eyes lighted on 
little Angelo. 

"Angelo, can you give me a sentence?" 

"Sure," said Angelo. "My popa, he getta up disa morn and 
he lighta da stove. She smoke. He say, "Damma disa range!" 
Selected. 



Mark Twain was called upon to speak at a club, and took for 
his subject "Honesty." He said that when he was a boy at 
home he one day saw a cart of melons. He was a boy and 
tempted ; besides, he liked melons. 

"I sneaked up to that cart," said Mark, "and stole a melon. 
I went into the alley to devour it. But — I did no sooner set 
my teeth into it than I paused ; a strange feeling came over 
me. I came to a quick conclusion. Firmly, I walked up to 
that cart, replaced the melon and — took a ripe one." — 
Selected. 



First Lady — We got a hundred dollar radio set and 
had the electrician come in and attach it. 

Second Lady — That's nothing. We had a five hundred 
dollar set and the sheriff came and attached it. — Tennessee 
Tar. 



Pa's Fatal Error 

Johnnie (at poultry show) — Let's stay until they take the 
animals out. 

Mother — They don't let them out, my boy. 

Johnnie — Yes, mother; last night dad told Uncle Bill they 
would wait after the show and pick up a couple of chickens 
— Service Station News. 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the~~ 

VALLEY o/ the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Hfushrooms." 

Clean Room*. Clean Linen, Clean Ever} thing 

Vifil Sonoma County'* Famous Re»nrt» and Mitternl (Warm %' a .er) Swimming 

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Telephone 110 



FETTERS' HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. .Mas- 
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Write George Fetters, Mgr.. or Peck-Judah. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

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'm? s'lr^, W 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
H K'.msv Street Phone Keahi 



J GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAt DIRECTORS 
| Charel — 771 In 777 Valencia Street, net. ISth and ll'lh Sis. 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



16 




-He better it geb- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 



Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cup* were served at the Pan- 
ama PaclUo International Exposition 




N W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




Bl t'lniN STEAMERS FROM 
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' Direct Soilings via Panama Canal 

THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 
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SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued from Page 13) 

The road as described above can be 
covered comfortably in two days, but 
it must be remembered that the towns 
mentioned are, with the exception of 
Hornitos, only those on the main road. 
There are many, many more of equal 
interest, lying slightly off the main 
road, which may be reached by making 
short side trips, and one interested in 
this region could profitably spend days 
or weeks in exploring and conversing 
with the old timers, a few of whom are 
left in nearly every old "camp." living 
in the past and untroubled by the hurry 
and bustle of present-day life. 



The Desire to Jump Off 
Have you ever gone up on a high 
building and become suddenly pos- 
sessed of a desire to jump off? 

This is the feeling that usually as- 
sails persons unaccustomed to heights. 
This is because the "medulla oblon- 
gata," the co-ordinating part of the 
brain, perceives nothing around with 
which to make comparisons and con- 
sequently becomes somewhat con- 
fused. 

The same effect is produced to a 
lesser extent when a valley driver sud- 
denly finds himself driving along a 
road which clings to the side of a cliff 
with a river or canyon hundreds of 
feet below on one side and a sheer 
wall on the other. Were the drop only 
15 or 20 feet and the road no wider, 
the driver would negotiate it without 
difficulty, but the fact that there is 
nothing on the one side with which to 
make unconscious comparisons causes 
a confusion in the brain. 

The driver, who is unaccustomed to 
mountain driving and who has ven- 
tured on to a road of the sort described, 
should not even glance down into the 
depths but should keep his eyes on the 
road and the bank side. Small bushes 
along the outer edge, while they do not 
afford any actual protection, give a 
sense of security simply because they 
are something for the "medulla" to 

"tie to." 

The Royal Veterinary College in 
London cares for domestic animals in 
all their injuries and ailments and is 
the largest institution of its kind in 
the world. 



Cameo 
The screen feature at the Cameo this 
week is House Peters in "Head 
Winds." Robert Carlson is the soloist 
for the week; there are the usual short 
reels, comedv and news reels. 



No Concealment 

Lady Patient : " I want to be vacci- 
nated, but I don't want the scar to 
show." 

"Take it internally," said the doctor. 




Lee S. Rolierts 



August 29, 1925 

Native Son Writes Official Anthem 
for Diamond Jubilee 

Lee S. Rob- 
erts, a native 
son, born 
South o' the 
Slot in San 
Francisco, has 
written the 
music for the 
o f f c i a 1 an- 
them of the 
Diamond Ju- 
bilee Celebra- 
tion. Wm. A. 
Brewer wrote 
the words, 
and critics 
who have 
heard this an- 
them predict 
that it will be 
even more popular than "Smiles," the 
popular song, which Mr. Roberts also 
wrote, and which is such a favorite of 
Mayor Rolph's. 

Mr. Roberts has been away from San 
Francisco for a number of years, but is 
now permanently located here at 230 
Post Street, where he is president of a 
very beautiful store, the Chickering 
Piano Warehouse Co. 

In speaking of returning to San 
Francisco, Mr. Roberts said : 

"Anyone who has ever lived in San 
Francisco, or even visited here, goes 
away, only to find that they have left 
temporarily, on a 'leave of absence' at 
it were, — for once you have lived here, 
you are never satisfied anywhere else." 
The anthem which Mr. Roberts has 
written, "California to Thee," appears 
on the front cover of the News Letter 
this week. It has been accepted as the 
official anthem by the Native Sons and 
Daughters of the Golden West, for the 
Diamond Jubilee Celebration, Septem- 
ber 5 to 12. 



In old King Tut's time, three barley- 
corns made an inch, and the length of 
an inch varied with the excellence of 
the barley crop. 



A bronze tablet in honor of Edison, 
set in a huge boulder with a base of 
concrete containing bricks from the 
foundation of the first Edison home, 
was recently unveiled by Mrs. Edison 
at Menlo Park, New Jersey, near the 
spot where Edison made his first in- 
vention. 

* * * 

John Muir, naturalist and poet, and 
largely responsible for the setting aside 
of the Yosemite Valley as a national 
park, called sheep "hoofed locusts," be- 
cause of their ruthless raids upon for- 
est vegetation. 



August 29, 1925 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on Murders 



IT IS getting so that San Francisco, and California, in 
general, must have at least one new murder mystery, 
every week or so. The deluded few, who constantly dream 
of, and sometimes try to execute the perfect "crime of 
the age," are either in prison or in our midst. The latter 
thought is one of the reasons for my growing timidity in 
the presence of over methodical and too analytical per- 
sons. A crime in the head is worth two in the bush and is 
far less trouble. 

When a man, with a well-developed sense of self-preser- 
vation, leaves his office at night, nowadays, he stops to 
debate whether it is, after all, more healthy and economical 
to walk home, or to the train, especially down Third Street. 
Between recklessly driven automobiles and homing truck 
drivers, modern man is forced to live quite as perilous an 
existence as did his ancestors, back in the days when the 
wide open spaces had swinging doors, and there were two 
meanings to the word "bar." 

Murders and the doings of our village cut-ups seem to 
furnish an uncanny fascination for many men and women, 
and. now that literacy is attained at an earlier age, for 
children, too. The daily newspapers recognize this fact 
and, aiming to please, feature each succeeding mystery, 
quite as much as they did great battles of past wars. The 
best newspaper reporters, at some time or other, find a 
chance to follow out childhood ambitions of becoming world 
famed detectives. Combined with this propensity is their 
natural showman instinct. Witness the long string of clues 
and descriptions of moves to be made by the police, made 
a part of a murder story, in news columns, before the killer 
has had an opportunity of recapitulating his acts or fully 
knows what it is all about. So long as the public believes 
the stuff, it is justified ; and the public simply has to believe 
someone — otherwise the slayer would not get enough noto- 
riety to compensate him for his act. 

There are several kinds of murder, all of which are so .old. 
they have whiskers, sciatica and lumbago. There are axe 
murders, hammer murders, poisonings, stabbings, drown- 
ings, burnings and "perfect murders" — essayed by perfect 
boobs. 

It is much easier to "do" a murder than to hide the evi- 
dence. (This thought has been translated into all languages, 
including the Scandinavian, without much benefit). 

Conan Doyle and Maurice Le Blanc were very original in 
thinking up gruesome killings, and devised some astounding 
solutions. Their characters are, however, as amateurs, com- 
pared to modern butchers, of both sexes and all ages. 

The female is said to be more deadly than the male. Be 
that as it may. We know the murderess is likely to be dead, 
after the jury has gotten its eyes and ears full. As in the 
old days, when garden swings were considered lots of fun. 
the men do the s\ ringing, and the women just wait until the 
old cat, of public indignation, dies a natural death, at which 
time they step out of it all. 

The principles of murder applied to some people would be 
a god send to the race. Take, for instance, the portly indi- 
vidual who coughs on your neck, in the street car: the busy 
body who is always selling tickets to this and to that : the 
office crab; the confirmed reformer: the amalgamated order 
of butt-ins : the designer of modern homes ; the originator of 
the delicatessen, and SO on. without end. 

If I had time, and could afford to advertise, I should like 
tii get out an illustrated brochure on simple and fancy mur- 
der-, their hows, whens and wheres. 



I* ■■■■■■■-ii »— — . 



CAFE MARQUARD 



Adjoining Wilkes and Curi'un 

Theaters, (Jeary and Maaun. 

Phone Prospect CI 



Nightly 

Jack Holland and Miss Jean Barry 

in 

REVUE 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 7 p. m. lo 1 a. m.— DANCING 






Our Super-service Costs Nothing Extra 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 



'Phone Market 916 



TRADEMARK. -_- jg ^— ~ . « 

ii|C Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities In engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 
462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angele* 




llrlnl \* ■■ k A|»|i -■- 

f il I n I II K In Vlltniiiii- 
IlIlM Oxy-Ai-rlj li-iif 
\\ i- lit In K — II I in' k- 
vii, i hiiiK. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. .1. EVAN'S 


PALACE GARAGE 


Opposite Palace HofPl 


IIAVR VOIR r\!tS WASIIKI1 \M> IIRK »*KII 


"THE PALACE WAY" 


II ntt-H. ar.p pi>r ilny: *7.."»« |ier month 


PHONE POrm.AS 243 


SI* Floor* for Srrvlrc nnd Morncr of \ iit<nii«»l>l'*-* 




-1 



Tel. Kearny 365 



655 Sacramento St. 
Pet. Kearny and Montgomery St-- 



IS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 29, 1925 




Took His Loss 

Rastus : "Here's dat quatah Ah bor- 
rowed from yuh las' year." 

Sambo: "Yuh done kep' it so long 
Ah doan know as it's wuff while to 
change my 'pinion of yuh jes' fo' two- 
bits." 

E- PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther It be type- 
writer paper 01 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask youi 
printer or sia- 

^^■iFnni-.i Jmm you^U^''" 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street. San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 

San CrnnclMCO — HurllnKnme 

Wexl. 7D» *?* 



pone Si rim 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

[Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmtktrs and Watchmakers 

filME, ANIiyi'E AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

208 PohI Street nt Grant Avenue 

Snn I r;i nristii. < ulif- 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo CoiMlit 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 Emerson St. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



The Club Beaux Arts 

The Club Beaux Arts at 116 Maiden 
Lane, San Francisco's down-town gal- 
lerv, will open its second season with 
a Jubilee Exhibition of California 
painters on September 1st, 1925. All 
the canvases shown will be typical of 
California in subject matter, and visi- 
tors to the city are cordially invited to 
the gallery. Some of the painters who 
will have pictures in the Jubilee Exhi- 
bition are Carl Oscar Borg of Los An- 
geles ; Annin Hansen, C. S. Price. Al- 
bert Barrows and Gay of Monterey. 
Ray Bovnton, Guest Wickson and 
Phillips 'Lewis of Berkeley; Helen 
Forbes, Maynard Dixon, Gottardo Pi- 
azzoni, Ralph Stackpole, Rinlando 
Cuneo, Rowena Meeks Abdy, Otis 
Oldfield, Walter Sutter, Smith O'Brien, 
Charles Bleil, Oliver and Gertrude Al- 
bright. Florence and Burnside Tufts. 

The Club Beaux Arts was estab- 1 
lished a year ago last August for the 
purpose of promoting and maintaining 
a series of carefully selected exhibi- 
tions of contemporary art by the fore- 
most California painters and sculptors. 
During the year ten lectures on art 
are given before the club on the first 
Tuesday of each month. Mrs. Jessie 
Fremont G. Herring of the Berkeley 
League of Fine Arts, who has been 
visiting the galleries of the East, will 
give the first lecture on Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 1st, 1925 at 2:30, she will speak 
on "the relation of modern art to our 
day." 

The Advisory Board for the club 
for the coming year are: 

Edgar Walter, Frank Van Sloun, 
Maynard Dixon, Lewis P. Hobart, 
Ottorino Ranchi and Gottardo Pi- 
azzoni. Mrs. Beatrice Judd Ryan, the 
manager of the Club Beaux Arts, has 
just been appointed the chairman of 
the Art Committee for the Federation 
of Women's Clubs of the city and 
county of San Francisco. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 



SUMMONS 

No. 13D709 



I'll.- MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 
location of principal place of bnalneas, Ban 
EranclMCOi Cnlif. 



Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of tin- Directors held on the nth day 
or August, 1925, an assessment "f one-half 
cent per share was levied upon the issued 
capita! stuck of the corporal ion. payable im- 
mi dlately in legal money of the Dnlted States, 
t.. the Secretary, at the office of the company, 
Co, on j::7. Uonadnock Building, San Fran- 
, I 'alifornia. 

\ny stock on which this assessment shall 
remain ur.paid on the Huh flay of September, 
tic 1 :,, will be delinquent and advertised for 
saic at public auction, and unless payment i ; 
made before will to- Bold on Thursday, the 
lr.lh <lny of October. 11(2",, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, tog-ether with costs of ad- 
vertising and expense of sale. 

M. .1. SEELT, Secretary. 

:::7 Monadnock Bldg., 
S;i n Francisco. Calif. 



Action Drought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California In and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the Cam- 
plaint Filed in the Office of the County 
clerk of Said City and County. 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
1m ancisco. 

Walter Samuel Woodward. Plaintiff, vs. 
Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to Florence Woodward, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an 
action brought against you by the above- 
named Plaintiff in the Superior Court of the 
Stat.- of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer the 
Complaint filed therein within ten days (ex- 
elusive of the day of service) after the ser- 
vice on you of this summons, if served within 
tiiis City and County; or if served elsewhere 
within thirty da3 b. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
bonds of matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff and defendant, on the ground of de- 
fendant's willful neglect; also for general 
relief, as will more fully appear in the Com- 
plaint on Hie, to which special reference is 
herehy made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the 
said Plaintiff will take judgment for any 
money or damages demanded in the complaint 
as arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for other relief demanded in the com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the 
Superior Court of the State of t'alifornia. in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
II. 1. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By W. S. SHAFEl:, Deputy Clerk. 

Dated July 27, 1825 

AUSTIN LEWIS, 

473 Mills Building. San F. ancisco, Calif.. 
Attorney for I'laintilT. 

No. 14G.330 

SUMMONS 



In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and fur the City and 
County of San Francisco, ami the complaint 
filed in the office of the County Clerk of said 
City and County. 

Frederick Marriott, Plaintiff, vs. N. F. Wil- 
son, Defendant, 

The People of the State of California send 
greeting to: N. F. Wilson. Defendant. 

You are hereby directed to appeal- and an- 
swer the complaint in an action entitled as 
above, brought against you in the Superior 
Courl Of i In. Slate of California, in and for 
iln- City and County of San Francisco, within 
ten days after the service on you of this sum- 
mons — if served within this City and County; 
or within thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appi ar and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff wilt take judgment for any money 
Or damages demanded in the complaint as 
arising upon contract or will apply to the 
Court for any other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

UivL-n under my hand and seal of the .Su- 
perior Courl at the City and County of San 
Francisco. State of California. 

Dated April 30, 1924. 

[Seal] H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By W. R. CASTAGNETTO,, 

Deputy Clerk. 
AUSTIN LEWIS. Attorney for Plaintiff, 47^ 
Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 



Estate of John Oliver, deceased. No. 41,989 
Dept. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. ,J. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
.lohn Oliver, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice, in the office 
of the Clerk of the Superior Court of the 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County Of San Francisco, or to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within four (4i 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice i" ill'' said administrator, at his office. 
858 I'helan Building, San Francisco. I'ali- 
ornia. which said last-named office the under- 
sign i <i selects as his place of business in all 
mat ters connected with said estate of John 
Oliver, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of John Oliver, 
deceased. 

Dated. San Francisco, California. July 7. 
1925. 

CULLINAN & HTCKEY. 
Attorneys for Administrator. 



WHERE TO DINE 




Caroline Jones 
Luncheon is served from II :30 to 2:30 




' A and 






445 Powell St., 

San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays, Dinner. 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchant's lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



BLANCO'S 



O'Fnrrell mid Link in Streets 1'hone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 

in the finest cafe In America 

Luncheon , II rUO to 2 p. in.) - 75c 

Dinner, Week Hays ---____ 91,50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays - $1.75 



L: 



NO A H'S 
ARK 



IIS Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cookini 

Open From 

11 :30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

6:30 p. m. to 8:80 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:.'10 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

Half Block from Highway 



1 




Uncle Tom's Cabin j 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8-.00 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M. 
UNSURPASSED CUISINE 






L 


14-Mile House 


Carl Leonhardt 

formerly of 
Golden Gate Park Cuioa 



CLIFF-HOUSE 



Plate Lunch 
Plate Dinner - 
Sunday Dinner 
Phone Pacific 123 



- - 60c 

60c to 85c 
• - $1.00 



A la Carte at popular prices 
Banquet Rooms and Card Rooms 



Richard P. Roberts, Proprietor J 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think thnt n vigorous r. rushing once or i vi- ire a day In 
taking very good enre of them. llrushlng In only n part of the 
process. Many things con happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist eon lake care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as Mound nx you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wall for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum trouble* tlw»* will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore f Do your gums bleed? Call In todny 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing:. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield S35 

SPECIALISTS — Extraction*; Crown.; Self Cleaning Bridge; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plate. 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select hoarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters or St. Dominic 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

"PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



r- 
1 


DR B. W. HAINES 


i 


DENTIST 
Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell Hours 9 t- 4 


L 


San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



,cd By Hood Only— SnitI Called For aod Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



583 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



9 iv Fnutusca 

sr Fk.mu.in 2^10 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottleit at thy SprnmgV 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

22<» Clara Street — Carfirld* £44 



The World 

IN ROTAGRAVURE 



Beautiful photographic studies 
from all corners of the earth 
are assembled for your enter- 
tainment in The Sunday Chron- 
icle Rotagravure. The most in- 
teresting figures in the news — 
whether leaders of world-poli- 
tics — dainty danseuses in char- 
acteristic poses — or heroes of 
daring air flights — celebrities 
in all ranks of life are to be 
found in this beautiful section 
of photographic art. See it 
every week. The 

£>an iFranriarn 

ftfyratwu? 



ROTAGRAVURE 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 






The tenter 
for Thtatrtt 
'Bankt, Shopt 

Tleate ttrite 
for 'Booklet 



$ RATES— ^Per^Day, single, European Wan 
52.50 io*4.00 
J. 50 to 5.00 
6.00 to 8.00 



120 rooms wiih running water 
220 rooms wiih bath 
160 rooms with bath 



Double, $4.00 up 

Alto « number of Urge ind beautiful rooms and 
n suites, some in period furnishings with grand piano, 
'■ fire place and bath, $J0 00 up. 

LARGE AND WELL EQUIPPED SAMP! E ROOMS 

V^A^CHO QOLF CLUB] 
L available to all guests J 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 

^Manager 



it 



HOTEL 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles «... 



i SAVE MONEY! 

Buy Automobile 
Commute Books 



ROUND TRIP DAILY 
Including Sundays 

$23.45 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 



A. 0, Stewart 
President 



Harry E. Speas 
Vice-Pres. and Gen'l. Mgr. 



Serving the Southwest 

— through daily servire via El Paso, San An- 
tonio, Houston to New Orleans — the New 

Sunset Limited 



Luxurious travel accommodations — club car; 
tlandard sleepers ; observation car ; barber, 
valet, maid; shower-baths. 

And Southern Pacific dining car service na- 
tional standard in transportation catering. 

See, this way, Apache trail of Arizona. 

Connects at New Orleans with Southern Pacific 
ocean steamers to New York and with trains 
north and east. 

For fares, reservations, and full infor- 
mation, ash any agent — 



Back East 

low roundtrip sum- 
mer excursion fares 
in effect. October 31 
return limit. 




Southern Pacific Lines 



Ferry Station 65 Geary Street Third St. Station 
Or Phone SUTTER 4000 




SAN FRANCISCO 




1850 



The Spirit of Wells Fargo's Pony Express Guides 

the Air Mail 

Conrtesy Weill Furze Bjni & Union Trull Co. 

[DIAMOND JUBILEE EDITlONj 

Sept.5-1QX5 
5°f 



1925 



•BUILT TO OUTCLASS, OUTRUN AND OUTLAST ANY CAR ON THE ROAD 




oA %are Jewell 



M 



ASTER craftsmen work for six months to 
build a Duesenberg. 



Slowly, with a watchmaker's precision, each part is 
assembled and each body line fashioned. 

Naturally, production is very limited. But the Dues- 
enberg owner can ever appreciate the fact that he 
possesses a motor car creation ranking in the same 
class as an original painting or rare jewel. 



-Duesenberg^ 






"The grand <Prix Car" 



LLOYD S.JOHNSON COMPANY 

1930 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Til L 



'■'P J 



§ 



±E3 
ORIG 



JH 



~j 






J rLr 



STRAIGHT 



si m 

EIGHT 




E»t«bll»h«d July 20, 1556 




JL JtiXx 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

.Tr from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

n eiephone Sutter S535, Entered at San Francisco, California, Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office: .Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, J6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



cvn 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SEPTEMBER S, 1925 



No. 10 



'Dedication 

By E. Farrand Ross 

To you, glorious Native Sons and Daughters of the Golden West, we dedicate this Diamond Jubilee 
Edition of the San Francisco News Letter! 

I'ublished as it is, in the week of the Jubilee Celebration, it will ever hold a deep significance not 
nnl)' for the native Californian, but also for our adopted sons and daughters, for it is an issue contain- 
ing a fascinating and authentic record of the most important events that have transpired during a peri' id 
from the year 1831 up to the present time; and it commemorates the greatest epoch of our history, — the 
admittance of California into the Union as a State. 

It lias been compiled from many sources. — from pioneer manuscripts; from books written by 
undisputed authorities, brought down to the present clay by the most competent narrators 
short, a digest of our marvelous progress from the coming of the Argonauts 
the date of our developing into a regal commonwealth. 

It is our humble offering to one of the finest bodies of men and women that the world holds, and 
it envelops a tabloid history of a State that is capable of producing everything necessary to human 
life, — an Empire in itself. 

It is presented with a feeling of pride in our City ami State, and in our people; the descendant- ,<i 

the old Dons, who stood for a hospitable and romantic aristocracy; and of our pioneers, who demon 
strate a spirit of adventure, courage, perseverance, strength; a combination that would he hard to 
discover anywhere else in the world. 



It i^ 
acn iss the plains, up ti 



THE PONY EXPRESS MAIL SERVICE 

In the "days of old, the days of gold." — 
the stage coaches of Wells, Fargo >V Com- 
pany, dashed across the continent from Sac- 
ramento. California to St. Joseph, Missouri, 
in twenty days time. This, being considered 

loo slow to wait for letter- anil new s. the 
Pony Express was organized on April 3, 

1859. Six hundred bronchos chosen for en- 
durance and speed, were bought, and sev- 
ent v-five men, chosen because of their light 
weight, horseman-hip. bravery, marksman- 
ship and endurance were secured. The serv- 
ice was instituted by Henry Wallace, who. 
on the above date, carried a message "i con- 
gratulation from President Buchanan to the 
Governor of California, reaching Sacra- 
mento ten days later. 



PRESENT AIR MAIL SERVICE 

The transcontinental air mail service, op- 
erating daily eastbound and westbound, 

leave- Concord Field, Concord at 8:45 a. m.. 
and lladlev Field, New Brunswick, X. J. at 
9:30 a.m. Planes carry mail for all points in 
the United State-. Mail for places not 
touched by mail plane- i- sent h\ train from 
the nearest air mail depot. 

The mail closes at the Ferry postoffice at 
5 :30 a. m. and an hour or more earlier at the 
red. white and blue air mail boxes that are 
-cattered throughout the business district. 
In New York the air mail closes at S :30 a. m. 
on Saturdays and holidays. The air mail 
leaves New York for Crissy Field, San Fran- 
ci-co at 9:00 in the morning ami reaches San 
Francisco at 5:00 the next day. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



YERBA BUENA 

Site of San Francisco in 1 83 1 




Yerba Buenn (Now San Francisco) in the Spring of 1837 



II '1 OF Mil. V 



WILLIAM H. DAVIS, who visited the California coast, 
1831. in the trading hark Louisa, one of the many Boston 
vessels that combed the trading spots of the Pacific, under the 
guidance of inquisitive and venturesome Yankee skippers, gives 
a lively account of the life, barter and primitive surroundings 
of the Missions, posts, ranchos and life of that period. Mexi- 
can rule, of course, prevailed. The comparatively few for- 
eigners were fairly treated, and numbers of them accumulate 1 
big ranchos and fortunes. Davis did so well on the trip, and 
was so delighted with his adventure in this strange land, that 
he returned two years later in the trading bark Volunteer. 
These Yankee traders scraped up all the commodities in sight 
and touched at San Diego, Los Angeles. Santa Barbara, Monte- 
rey, San Francisco and other coast ports. 

According to Davis on his trip to San Francisco in 1833: 
"We anchored in a cove known as Yerba I'.uena. Telegraph 
Hill was then called Loma Alto. At that time there were 
some half dozen barks from Atlantic ports trading along 
the California coast. Alaska and the Hawaiian Islands. 
All that time. Captain M. (",. Vallejo, later General Val- 
lejo, was in command of the Presidio. The population "I" 
the post was about two hundred and fifty men. women anil 
children. The soldiers were Spanish, and all daring vaque- 
ros. At that time Captain Yallejo had recently married 



Donna Francisca Benecia Carrillo. Fort Point was then 
garrisoned and known as Punta de Castillo, or Castle 
Point. A small number of foreigners were living near the 
post, among them Captain \Y. A. Richardson, who owned 
the Sausalito ranch, and who was married to the daughter 
of the late Captain Ygnacio Martinez, who had been in 
charge of the Presidio post preceding Captain Vallejo, 
John Read of Ireland, owner of the Read ranch adjoining 
;he Sausalito ranch. Tim Murphy and James Black, the 
latter of Scotland. Otters were then numerous in the bay 
and their skins plentiful. Murphy hunted them and sold 
their pelts to the Boston traders for from $40 to $60 each. 
Richardson commanded a vessel and traded along the coast 
as far south as Valparaiso. Trade at that time was prac- 
tically all barter, tallow and hides, sea otter and beaver 
skins being the currency. The latter animals were plen- 
tiful along the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. 

"In 1835 the Mission Dolores, now on Sixteenth Street, 
San Francisco, was then located about a mile from the 
site of the town of Yerba Buena. In August the popu- 
lation was estimated at two thousand Indians, many of 
them having been taught trades as blacksmiths, ship- 
wrights, carpenters, tailors, etc. The Mission then owned 
tens of thousands of cattle, sheep, horses. Its possessions 
included most of San Mateo County." 




The San Francisco Waterfront, 192 



I" III MIIIIII1V AMI I 



September 5, 1925 



DIAMOND fUBILEE EDITION 



SAN FRANCISCO CHRISTENED a YEAR BEFORE 

the GOLD RUSH 











- 



\am 







l 



\« 




/ iew of San Francisco (formerly } erba Buena) in 1847, Before the Discovery of Gold 
We, the undersigned, hereby certify that this picture is a faithful and accurate representation of San Francisco as 11 really appeared March, 1847, 

.1. 1 1. STEVENSON, Commanding Lsl Regiment "f New x*ork Volunteers In the War with Mexico. 
GENERAL ,\I G VALLEJI >. 
QE( IRGE 11 VI IE, First Alcalde District ol San Francisco, 1841 

A — IT. S. .S. "Portsmouth." H — U. s. Transport Ships | ." "Choo," "Susan Drew" and "Thomas II Perkins." They broughi the 1st i: 

i iK- n i, Nnv Vurk Volunteers, Col, J. I >. Stevenson, Commanding. C — Chip "Vandalla," merchantman i i" Howard & Melius. Coasting 

sch ler. E — Launch "Luce," belonging to James Lick. 

1. Custom House. - Calaboose. '■'■ School house I. Alcalde office. ."> City Hotel, owned by U'm A. Leldesdorff. 6. Portsmouth Hotel, 7. Win. 
M, Davis' st, ,ri-. 8. Howard & Melius Ston . the old Hudson Bay Co, Building. :■ w. A, Leldesdorfl warehouse. 1". Samuel Brannan's resi- 
dence. 11. W. A. Leldesdorff. l*-'. First resident t the Kuss family. 18, John Sullivan's resld ter T. Sherlock's n i nee ' 5. Juan 

('. Davis residence, 16. G. Reynold's residence. IT. A. i ifillis Boarding House, 18, Fitch A McKurley Building. 18. Capt Vloget's residence. 
^0. .inn. Fuller's residence. 21. John Noe's residence. 82. John Pidlla's resid A. a. Andrews' residence. -' t '"apt. Antonio Ortega's 

residence. 25. Francisco Cacerez's residence, 26. Capl Hllder's residence 87 General Q. Vallejo Building. 28. C. L. Ross Building. 29. Mill 

SO Captain .ii.hu Pattj adobe building ::i. Dr. K. P. ' Roberl Ridley's residence. Los Pechos de la Ch :'.l. Lone 

Mountain. 36. sills Blacksmith Shop 

"Trail to Presidio, 

■ Tra il to M Lssion I lolores, 



UP TO January. 1847. tlie little village of -hacks and occa- 
sional buildings between Sacramento ami Washington 
streets, ami from Stockton street to the hay shore, which then 
washed the present Montgomery street, was known its Yerba 
Buena. There was a lively contest between two rival factions on 
the bay shores at that time to capture the name of St. Francis 
for their respective towns, Yerba Buena ami Benicia. The latter 
place was then being backed by a number of strong capitalist-, 
led h\ Mariano Vallejo ami Thomas O. I.arkin. They were 
determined to make Benicia the capital of the territory. Wash- 
ington Bartlett, the first American alcalde, made a successful 
Rank movement and succeeded in capturing the name San Fran- 
cisco and issued the first official announcement of the change 
of name. During 1S4~. six bark-rigged trading vessels entered 
the bay. The population then totaled 459 souls. The exports 
for thai year wen- valued at $49,597 and the imports $3 



IX 1835, Captain W. A. Richardson was appointed fir-t 
harbor master of the Spanish holding called Verba Buena 
(changed later to San Francisi same year he erected 

the first dwelling. It was a large piece of canvas stretched 
on four redwood posts, and covered by an old ship sail. 
Richardson had charge of several schooners belonging to 
the local Mission, and one belonging to the Santa Clara 
M ission. 

Three years later, in May. 1836, another famous pioneer 
arrived. Jacob Leese. < In landing in the Verba Buena cove 
b) -ea be announced that he would establish a mercantile 
business. His pardners, who bandied a branch at Monterey, 
were Nathan Spear and \Y. S. Hinkley. The Spanish 
ernor at Monterey instructed the alcalde at Verba Buena to 
grant Mr. Leese an allotment of land within the government 
Minued on Page 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



SAN FRANCISCO at the TIME the GREAT GOLD 

RUSH BEGAN 



EARLY in 1848, the city council made strong efforts to 
check the rising title of gambling, a vice then sweeping 
the city. An ordinance was passed to seize all moneys found 
on gambling tables. The people were against the law. and 
later it was withdrawn. That withdrawal paved the way 
for the reckless gambling that flooded the town when the 
first of the hilarious gold seekers reached the city a few 
months later. In this period, 1848, sales became more nu- 
merous in disposing publicly of the town's real estate. Some 
great bargains were then picked up which became the nuc- 
leus of large personal estates. Many lots were sold at from 
$16 to $50 each. 

In '48, the school census showed a population of 575 
males, 177 females and 60 children, a population of 812. The 
buildings numbered 200. There were two hotels, boarding 
houses, saloons and ten-pin alleys. Twelve mercantile 
houses were established, two more wharves were in course 



September. 1848, was an eventful month to the little 
community. Gold dust was the only currency, and a big 
meeting was called to establish its value. Everybody in 
town attended. The ratio was fixed at $16 to the ounce, 
and payable on all contracts at that rate. Congress was 
petitioned to establish a branch mint. Another very impor- 
tant event was the arrival of the brig Belfast from New 
York. She discharged the first real cargo of merchandise 
at Broadway wdiarf. The price of goods in the town in- 
stantly dropped 25 per cent, and the values in real estate 
jumped from 50 to 100 per cent. The day previous a lot 
at Washington and Montgomery streets was offered at 
$5000, with no takers. The day after the arrival of the Bel- 
fast the same lot sold for $10,000. 

In December, 1848, the commercial markets were fluctuat- 
ing wildly. December 1st, flour was $27 per bbl. ; beef, $20 
per bbl.; pork, $60; butter, 90 cents per pound, and cheese 




BY IIENKY FIRK9 



COUimil U( JOHN innMil 



San Francisco — 1849 



of construction, the townspeople were hopeful, and the pros- 
pects of the city good. April 3, 1848, the first public school 
u as opened. 

As spring advanced, the story of gold findings at Sutter 
Creek began to spread widely. Very quickly the excite- 
ment leaped to fever heat. Gold became the irresistible 
magnet and nothing could check the insistent rush. Lab- 
orers, clerks, waiters, servants, all disappeared as if by magic, 
and melted into the stream of feverish beings headed for the 
slopes of the Sierras. 

In the month of May more than 150 people left San Fran- 
cisco, and the days added to the departures. May 29th, 
"The Californian" announced it could not issue papers "un- 
til further notice" because its employees had all quit. Other 
papers were quickly closed down for the same reason. On 
July 15th, "The Californian" managed to get out a slip of 
paper announcing "The Whole World at War," alluding to 
the Revolution in France. The ( iovernor of the State issued 
a proclamation calling on the people to assist the authorities 
in apprehending deserters from the army and navy who had 
joined the gold rush. 



70 cents. Two weeks later, flour sold at $12 to $15 per bbl. ; 
while other articles had fallen proportionately. Brandy 
was $18 per gallon, and gold dust fell to $10.50 per ounce. 

The public schools were ordered closed because of the 
rush to the gold fields. Rates of tuition were set at $8 per 
term. The value of imported goods for the year was $1,000.- 
000. Coin came in to the same amount. Gold dust valued 
at S2.000.000 was exported during the year. A few years 
later that value in gold dust was exported semi-monthly. 

All classes gambled in those days. Everybody made 
money, and apparently everybody was becoming a Croesus 
or had the chance. Feverish hope was in the air whether 
fortunes were lost or won upon the green cloth. Few 
thought of their occupation or considered the future. The 
saloons were crowded night and day by impatient revelers, 
who were unable to satiate themselves, so mad were they 
with excitement. After the first wild rush the cooler- 
headed began to analyze the situation, and thereafter there 
was a more intelligent handling of conditions and prospects. 
But in '49 it was a wild revel, with showers of gold on every 
side, and the young community had not yet found itself. 



September 5, 1925 



DIAMOND JLH'.ILEK EDITION' 



SUTTER'S FORT and the MILL WHERE 
MARSHALL DISCOVERED GOLD 




PROM A PAINTING BY ARTHUR NAIIL 



TIRTESY OF PHIL n. BEKEART 



JIM MARSHALL'S discovery of grains and nuggets of 
gold in the South Fork of the American River at Sutter's 
Mill, January 24, 1848, started the great rush of argonauts to 
California, and the population grew by leaps for several 
years. But gold placers of richness had been discovered 
near the Mission of San Fernando in Southern California 
in 1843. In fact, these placers had been known to earlier 
residents. Over $100,000 in gold was taken out with crude 
appliances within two years, and a large part of it was 
shipped to the Philadelphia Mint for coining. These placers 
created practically no attention at the time. The country 
was under Mexican regime ; the natives regarded the dis- 
covery with shrugs of their shoulders; communication with 
outsiders was scant, and nothing in the semblance of a 
newspaper flourished. 

Marshall and Sutter tried their best to keep the discovery 
of gold quiet till the construction of Sutter's mill was com- 
pleted, well knowing that the workmen would desert their 
jobs and turn to digging gold. The news leaked out. and 
the stampede began. By the following August there were 
4000 men washing gold along the American River. At 
least one-third of this number were Indians. Among them 
all they were washing out about $50,000 per day in gold 
dust. 

When tidings of this discovery reached San Francisco, 
intense excitement prevailed, and this blazed almost into a 
mania when the first lucky miners reached the city, and lav- 
ishly scattered their rich findings among the stores, saloons 
and the many gambling places of the little town. The news- 
papers blazoned the exciting new> throughout the State 
and abroad, and outgoing vessels disseminated the tidings 
at every opportunity. Every resident on the peninsula that 
could get away hurried to the mines, and the most famous 
gold rush in the history of the world began. 



T N THE LAST half of '49, immigrants arrived at the rate 
of one thousand a week by sea alone. In this period large 
numbers came from South America, the islands of the Pa- 
cific and Australia. Late in the year droves came from the 
Eastern States by way of Cape Horn. During the year, 
40,000 arrived in San Francisco, aside from the desertions 
from vessels. Three-quarters of them headed for the mines. 
The population of the city, at that time, was about 25,000, 
with comparatively few women. There was no such place 
as a home, as now understood, and very few habitable 
houses. Frame buildings for business and dwelling were 
the best. Shacks and tents were common. Only the great 
gambling houses, hotels, restaurants and a few public build- 
ings had any pretention to size and comfort. The streets 
were uneven, and covered with numberless sand hills. In 
winter the mud was knee-deep in the streets, except the few 
that were planked. Citizens used lanterns at night. Every- 
body was busy. Heaps of goods disappeared as if by magic, 
off to the mines, and other shipments appeared in their 
stead. In the gambling dens bets were made as high as 
$20,000 on the turning of a card. The ordinary stakes were 
50 cents to $5. A half dollar was about the lowest coin in 
circulation. A copper, dime or five-cent piece was a curios- 
ity. For any small service nothing lower than 50 cents was 
given. The entrance to the pit in the circus was $3. Plain 
board was $30 a week. A hearty meal cost from $2 to $5, 
according to quality of viands. Wheat flour was $40 a bbl. ; 
potatoes and brown sugar. 37' .. cents per pound; a small 
loaf of bread. 50 cents. Coarse boots were $30 to S40 per 
pair; superior boots were $100. Laborers received $1 per 
hour, and skilled mechanics from $12 to $20 per day. The 
carpenters struck because they were getting only $12 per 
day, and demanded $16. 




COIITIM O, ,. M. ROK*T,ON 



Star* of C. L. Ross Is? Co. 

Corner of Montgomery and Washing' 

location was the waterfront in I 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



VESSELL FROM ALL QUARTERS FILLED the 

BAY FRONT in 1850 



Wharf for Panama Steamers 

extension "f Commercial 

street 




Clarke's Point. 



Taken from Telegraph Hill in April. 
Hie original in Golden Gate Park Museum 



Apollo Warehouse 

View of San Francisco. 1850 

y William B. McMurtrie, Draughtsman, "i ii" 
,-ith tli'' permission "t" li. F J . Schwerin, owner. 



Sansome Street 



Portsmouth Square 

to the riRht 



r S, Purveying Expedition. Photographed from 



Tl I I" FI RST brick building in San Francisco was erected 
in September. 1849, by William Heath Davis, on the 
northwest corner of Montgomery and California streets. 
While the building was being erected, enterprising citizens 
of Benicia, a rival metropolis at that time, made a proposi- 
tion tn transport all the bricks and material to Benicia and 
erect the building there gratis. A line site was also thrown 
in free of cost. Davis declined, but the bitter rivalry be- 
tween San Francisco and Benicia continued warm, and pep- 
pered with increasing jealousy. 

The brick building was later leased to the U. S. Govern- 
ment for a Customs I louse. June, 1850. The rental was to 
be $3000 a month. The structure was destroyed in the big 
fire of 1857. Davis lust an enormous income per vear. 
USE CUT V nfft cymfi 



EARLY in the last century, Boston vessels began to visit 
the Spanish towns and Missions along the upper and 
lower California coast. They came first to barter for both 
otter ami beaver pelts; later for tallow, hides, and materials 
used by the natives and settlers. In the '20's American trap- 
pers and hunters began to percolate into the State from the 
East. These early pioneer- of the West were sometimes 
harshly treated by the earlier Spanish governors, later they 
were welcomed : but they had to show passports and submit 
to surveillance. Later the new arrivals frequently married 
the daughters of wealthy Mexican ranchers, and took up 
large land grants. Very few of these huge holdings arc now 
in existence. 

The site of San Francisco at that time was on the rim of 
the trading world. 



% 




¥ 



Custom House, San Francisco, 1S51 



September 5, 1925 



DIAMOND fUBILEE EDITION 



ACTIVITIES of the VIGILANTES of 9 5 i and '56 




Remarkable Scene in '51 



i 1 1 1 m ji -Til. Mil 



ir a innriM 



This drawing represents the outoome of tin- first trial and "sentence of a criminal by Indignant citizens 'Aim took the law Into their 
own hands to suppress the crimes that flooded the State. The courts were apparently in th.- hands of the politicians and riffraff of the 
city, who used Ihe processes of the law for their own profit. There were many murders between 1MH and 1851. but the perpetrators 
readily escaped punishment and hangings were rare. The ballot box and the city administration of justice was a tare.'. The indignatioi 
of tlie better class of citizens was at fever heat. One day, at Sydney cove, .John Jenkins, walked deliberately into a merchant's store 
picked up the small safe, carried it to a boat at a nearby wharf and coolly rowed out Into the bay The alarm was given, and a num- 
ber of merchants pursued and overtook the man. He threw the safe overboard. Jenkins was brought back and taken to a building 
that occupied a coiner at s'ansome ami Pine streets, the site on which the Royal Insurance Building Is now located. The prisoner was 
duly tried by a jury and condemned to tie hanged. The impromptu Vigilance c'ommittee wasted no time, ami the execution took placi In 
the Plaza the same night at 2 a. m. This prompt action had its effect on the criminal class, and fur a while they remained under cover, 
Tlie act and its effect made a deep impression on the merchants and professional men. and thereafter their Ideas along 'liis line developed 
organization and prompt action. 



THERE probably never lias been in the United States a 
depth of political degradation greater than that which 
marked San Francisco in 1854 and '55. On account of the un- 
settled condition of society, business, and the feverish rnsb to 
rake fortunes from the rich placer mines, very few of the re- 
spectable classes of the community took any interest in public 
matters. Politics and the government of the city ami State 
were neglected by the residents, and naturally the offices and 
emoluments fell to the criminal elements. Some of the worst 
characters driven from the Bowery, X. Y.. and from Botany 
Bay, Australia, held office, and wallowed in all kinds of political 
corruption and graft. Trials in the courts became a farce, and 
those in power made no pretense of shielding their friends 
when charged with crimes, \n honest man'- vote was worth- 
less at the polls, and ballot box stuffing was openly practiced. 
Clubs were formed to sell their votes to the highest bidders. 

James King of William, born of an old Virginia family, and 
wlio became a prominent banker in this city, only to lose his 
fortune later in the local panic of 1854-5, was the man who 
practically alone started the work of rousing the better class 
of residents to the struggle of cleaning out tlie criminal ele- 



ment in power. At that time tlie criminal element was closel) 
affiliated with certain influential, wealthy people in sharing the 
profits of political corruption. While in the banking business, 
King had discovered numbers of corrupt transactions of this 
character. His friends knew this, and realizing that be was a 
man competent in everv way to nice' the situation, they urge ' 
him to start a paper and voice his convictions on the corrupt 
conditions. On October 8, 1855. he started the publication of 
the present Evening Bulletin. 4 pages. 10x15 in. in size. 

Many critics have said that no such paper, or anything like 
it. bad appeared in any country. It was an ideal lighting jour- 
nal, edited by a man who knew no fear, and dealt hi- iron clad 
blows impartially. So when Charles Cora, a notorious gambler. 
-hot down C S. Marshal Richardson, and was formally ar- 
rested by his friends in office. King, with his vigoious ar.lor, 
declared that if Cora was allowed to escape, the sheriff must 
bang. The fervor of King in his denunciations rmhc I th( 

i the general public to a high pitch. King widened his 
range of attack against the political element, and attacked Jas. 
F. Casey, one of the city supervisors, and showe I that he had 
(Continued on Page 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



The HISTORIC DOUBLE CELEBRATION 

in the PLAZA '51 




View of Portsmouth Square (the Present Plaza), July 4, IS^I. 



AMONG the interesting adventures and romances of the 
early '50's were the several filibustering expeditions in 
which William Walker's was the most prominent. The de- 
feat of Mexico and the large territory acquired by the United 
States, engendered the idea into ambitious adventurers that 
the Central American States offered a field of easy conquest 
and ripe plunder. Freeing nearby foreign territory for the 
purposes of spoils and self-advancement seemed to be an obses- 
sion of that period, an 1 the islands and mainland of the south- 
ern Americas offered golden opportunities for the bold. In 
1852 Walker announced Ids scheme of establishing a repub- 
lic in Lower California. The proposal was hailed with enthu- 
siasm by the adventurous. Promise- to pay, based on the pros- 
pective revenues of the proposed new government, were freely 
sold. Volunteers swarmed to Walker's ranks, and be occupied 
the port of La Paz. Apparently the local authorities paid no 
attention to his actions. Later. President Pierce, after Walker 
occupied Granada, issued a proclamation against the venture. 
However. Walker's path remained free to take possession of 
Lower California. It was suspected at the time that emissaries 
of Napoleon 111 were in communication with Walker and bis 
lieutenants. The newspapers of this city boldly charged that 
Walker's scheme was not to colonize but to construct a new 
State between this country and Mexico. 



In his attack on Sonora, Walker was defeated by the Mexi- 
lan troops and lied back to California. lie was duly tried by 
ihe United States courts and acquitted. I lis next filibustering 
expedition was to Nicaragua, but he was defeated by Rivas. 
Later he obtained more recruits, seized the government and 
captured the city of Granada, lie was promptly accepted as 
an ally of the regular government, and made commander in 
chief. March, 1856. Mis army of 1.200 men was filled largely 
by recruits from the United States. In the war which followed 
between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Walker was defeated in 
the first battle, but la er routed the Cos'a Ricans. His victory 
elevate 1 him to ruler of the State. To fill his treasury he con- 
fisca ed all the treasure of the local office of the Vanderbilt 
Steamship Company, and revoked its charter. He procured 
his ele\aticn to the Presidency by the usual forceful process, 
and decreed the prohibition of slavery. Later the natives and 
people revolted; Walker was abandoned by his army, and 
escaped by taking refuge in a United States man-of-war lying 
in the harbor. I lis next filibustering attempt was on I londuras. 
There he was made prisoner by an officer of the British navy, 
and surrendered to the Honduras authorities, tried by COlirl 
martial and shot. 



September 5, 1925 



PIAMOXD JUBILEE EDITION 



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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



WHEN SHIP NEWS WAS FIRST TELEGRAPHED 

from POINT LOBOS 



THERE WERE stirring adventures and "bad men" in 
those pioneer times, as the records of robberies of Wells 
Fargo stages, then the only carriers of passengers to the 
mining camps and villages dotting the Pacific Coast show. 
John Brent, one of Wells Fargo & Company's most coura- 
geous shotgun guards, had been transferred from the Montana 
road to the Tombstone, Ariz., road to protect the shipments of 
bullion and treasure being carried from Tombstone to the 
Southern Pacific rail connection at Benson, A short time after 
he had been on this run he saw two men, who had lately come 
to the town and whom he had seen and known in Montana as 
hard characters. Brent noted that they seemed to be hatching 
some scheme which meant mischief to Wells Fargo. 



The news of the robbery and killing was wired to Tombstone. 
The agent went to Brent's room and awoke him to tell him 
the news. Brent got up, dressed, took a rifle, revolver and 
cartridges, got a saddle-horse and started for the scene of the 
hold-up, which he reached just about daybreak. From the [mint 
of a hill on the road he saw smoke from a campfire. Me 
worked his way down the hill on foot, and succeeded in get- 
ting near enough to the camp to recognize one of the men he 
had '•ecu the night before in the saloon. The man was alone 
and cooking his breakfast, the two men doubtless separating 
after the hold-up. 

Brent waited until the man turned so he could see his face, 
then he raised his rifle, took deliberate aim and pulled the 




Old South Pink, the Swelldom of San Francisco, in 1S53. 



One night, just before the stage drove up to the express of- 
fice to take on the treasure which Brent was to guard on the 
run to Benson, he saw these two men stop at the door of a 
saloon next to the office, take in the situation, and then enter 
the saloon. Brent followed them in and up to the bar, where 
they were taking a drink. He stepped in between them and 
said : 

"If you men have any relatives or unsettled business, you had 
better get it all settled before you go out tonight on the job you 
have \\\c^\ up, for you will never come back here." 

Brent walked out and into the express office, took his sawed- 
off shotgun, his revolver and cartridge belt, got up on the box 
beside the driver, and started for llenson, but the two suspects 
did not follow him. 

The next day Brent came back on his run to Tombstone, hut 
was assigned temporarily to other duties, and an extra guard 
by the name of Lloyd took the run to Benson. The stage was 
stopped and Lloyd was killed. He was shot through the body 
and fell into the boot of the stage. The treasure box was taken 
but had little in it. The driver was ordered to drive on, which 
he did, to Benson with Lloyd's body. 



trigger. The outlaw fell over and landed face down in the fry- 
ing pan of bacon he had been cooking. Brent rode hack to 
Tombstone, taking what little money the man had belonging to 
Wells Fargo, and reported the incident to the sheriff, telling 
where he could find the remains. The robber was identified as 
"Red Bank Bill," a notorious outlaw. 

An exciting incident was that of an attempted hold-up on the 
stage line between I. os Angeles and San Diego. It occurred 
on the open plains near Santa Ana and under the cover of night. 
The stage had just left the little settlement of Santa Ana. where 
fresh horses had been provided, and George Smith, the driver. 
was swinging along at a good pace when out from the darkness 
came the sharp and imperative command, "Stop!" 

Put Smith instantly knew what was in the air, and did not 
obey the order. Instead he threw the lash in among his four 
fresh mustang horses and emitted a yell that a Comanche In- 
dian would envy. He kept going, hoping to get beyond the 
reach of the highwayman's lire, hut in this he failed, for he 
was struck in both hands by the first volley. 

He was game, however, and kept his team going until beyond 
(Continued on Pace 100) 



September 5, 1925 



DIAMOND [UBILEE EDITION 



11 



SAN FRANCISCO WHEN the NEWS LETTER WAS 
FOUNDED 69 YEARS AGO, in JULY, 1856 




San /' r/mri 
Looking S. E. From Tn\ 

NEXT to 1848, when gold was discovered in California. 
1856 was perhaps the most exciting year by reason of the 
flood of crime which flooded the city and brought about the 
organization of the famous Vigilance Committee of that year, a 
form of direct action which attracted the attention of the world 
to a new style of summary justice, the result of extraordinary 
conditions. Behind it were reasons and principles that radiate I 
in divers directions, some of them being influenced by the 
causes which eventually led to the Civil War. four years later. 
As for local conditions, it is enough to note that in the first ten 
months of 1855 there had been 489 murders in the state and 
only six legal executions. Stuffed ballot boxes were used to 
qualify the election of supervisors who did not reside in the dis- 
tricts voted. Ballot boxes with false bottoms were common. 
In 1853, with the politicians and "Mounds" running the city, 
the expenditures amounted to $2,646,000. Under a reform 
management, following the work of the Vigilance Committee of 
'56, the city got along in good shape with the expenditure of 
$353,000. The population then was estimated at 55,000. 




sro— 1856 

lor find S in in me ii to Sts. 

In the melodramatic and exciting scenes of this year, the 
Broderick-Terry duel, the flight of Harry Meiggs with $800.- 
000 tricked from the city's treasury, the shooting of James 
King of William, followed by the intrenchment in the heart of 
the city of Fort Gunnybags, defended by the Vigilance I om- 
mittee, the rise of the opposition Law and Order parly, and 
other vital actions — all furnished copy for the many periodicals 
ami daily papers then flourishing in the city. The papers of 
pioneer days had been practically pamphlets. By 1856, the edi- 
torial was rampant an«l was packed with fulminate that invited 
personal encounters. Personal journalism was in full swing, as 
was illustrated in the defiance of James King of William, owner 
of the "Bulletin," when be attacked the Xew York record and 
local practices of James 1'. Casey, a leading politician, who shot 
him and was promptly arrested ami tried by the Vigilance Com- 
mittee, 

While all this excitement was at its height, on July 20, 1856, 
the San Francisco News Letter, founded by Fred Marriott, 
made its first appearance and was an immediate success. 




San Francisco Postoffice, 1S56 



City Hall, 1S56 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



WHEN the PONY EXPRESS WAS in VOGUE 




View of San Francisco, 1859 
As seen from the residence of N. Larco, Esq., Green street. Telegraph Hill, looking south. 



COIRTESV OF JOHN HOWFIX 



THE early coaches of Wells Fargo consumed twenty days 
to cross from St. Joseph, Missouri, long considered a very 
outpost of civilization, to Sacramento. But twenty days t<> 
the merchants and bankers <>f the West Coast seemed an e'ern- 
ity. And so, a short time before the beginning of the Civil 
War. the Pony Express came into existence. Having received 
assurances that a fast communication from the Missouri River 
to California would be well patronized, three early stagecoach 
men, Senator W. M. Gwin, Alexander Majors and Daniel E. 
Phelps, made preparations for the inauguration of the new 
service. Six hundred bronchos, especially chosen for fleetness. 
toughness and endurance, were purchased. Seventy-five men, 
none of them weighing over one hundred and ten pounds, were 
engaged as riders, being selected on account of their bravery, 
their capacity for deprivation and their horsemanship, as well 
as for their shooting abilities and their knowledge of the craft 
and the manner of attack of the Indians. One of these, Henry 
Wallace, was selected for the signal honor of inaugurating the 
Pony Express, on April 3, 1859. In one of the laced pockets 
of his mochilla (Mexican saddlebags) he carried a message of 
congratulation from President Buchanan to the Governor of 
California, the words having been telegraphed that very morn- 
ing from Washington to St. Joseph. 

The packet which Wallace had taken out from St. Joseph 
reached the capital of California just ten days later, almost 
to the very hour. Night and day it had been carried forward 
unceasingly. A rider would pick it from his predecessor and 
ride forth sixty miles at top speed to the point where his "re- 
lief" awaited him, to pick up ihe mochilla and start off in turn 
upon his sixty mile stretch. Six hours were given each of these 
riders for his sixty mile stint, and in this time he rode six dif- 
ferent ponies. 

This express was a tremendous hit. Hankers and merchants 
found a ten day service between the western end of rail and 
telegraph communication at St. Joseph and Sacramento, where 
there was overnight boat transit to San Francisco, a tremendous 
help. For every day, except Sunday, a messenger left St. Jo- 
seph at noon, another coming east from Sacramento at eight 
o'clock in the morning. For two years this service was main- 
tained, through good weather and bad. The news of the tak- 
ing of Fort Sumter was transmitted from St. Joseph to Sacra- 
mento, eight hundred miles, in eighteen days and fourteen 
hours; Buchanan's last message in two hours' less time. Yet 
the Pony Express was destined to have only a short, if glori- 
ous, career. For along its path men were stringing copper 
wires, even in advance of the steady oncoming of the railroad. 



and some time in the early part of 1862 the telegraph reached 
California, and the Pony Express was dead. Financially it 
had never been a success. The letters carried were written on 
very fine tissue paper; the cost of carrying between here and 
St. Joseph, Missouri, 1,800 miles, was $5. 

The first mail by Pony Express reached Sacramento, April 
13, 1859. At that time the company employed 300 persons, SO 
of them being riders whose average performance was about 75 
miles. There is a record of one who rode 384 miles without 
stopping for meals and to change horses at stations. Prior to 
the advent of the Pony Express the newspapers had succeeded 
in having a telegraph wire run from San Francisco to Stock- 
ton and thence through the San Joaquin Valley and over the Te- 
hachapi Mountains to Los Angeles, the idea being to anticipate 
the arrival in San Francisco of the southern stage. But this 
endeavor failed to produce the improvements expected. The 
most news the local papers received through the Pony Express 
was the hair-breadth escapes from Indians and hold-up men. 
Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill and others of their calibre were among 
the riders. 

While the various competitors in carrying mail and passen- 
gers were struggling among themselves to capture the bulk 
of the overland trade, a little group of Sacramento business 
men. Leland Stanford and Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker 
among them, were steadily going forward on their Ctopian 
scheme of building a railroad up over the crest of the Sierras 
to connect with the great Union Pacific Railway, already push- 
ing itself westward from Omaha. They were blasting a path 
for their steel highway out of the very sides of the steep west 
slopes of California's great natural wall, and up that path the 
little wood-burning locomotives that, like the stage coaches, 
had been brought around the Horn in clipper ships, were al- 
ready tugging patiently. And it was only five years later that. 
in the lonely Utah Desert, the rails of the Central Pacific 
touched the rails of the Union Pacific, 

Other through transcontinental routes already were being 
planned. Asa P. Whitney was enthusiastic over his cherished 
plan of the Northern Pacific Railway, and waiting for Villard 
to come and change his dream into reality. In the south, Stan- 
ford and Hopkins and Crocker, Hushed with the success of 
their first transcontinental pathway, were building another, a 
private enterprise. Theirs was the Southern Pacific Railroad, 
and hardly had it made connection with the new and struggling 
Texas railroad system at El 1'aso, before the Atchison, Topeka 
& Santa Fe touched it at Deming, New Mexico. 



September 5. 1025 



DIAMoxn fUBILEE EDITION 



13 



FAMOUS FORT GUNNYBAGS of the 
VIGILANTES of ' 5 6 




The Plan of Fortification of Fort Gunny bags 



The headquarters of the Vigilance Committee of ';><» consisted of coarse sacks filled with sand and piled up as seen in tin picture, nearly 
six feet thiek and ten feet high. Cannon were placed at the embrasures at each corner. Inside was a platform ami openings, from which a 
scathing fire of musketry could be fired. There was a strong impression at the time that the rival Law ami Order Party had obtain 
trol Of certain surrounding buildings from which they might control the situation by arms. To meet SUCh an attack th<- Vtuilantes placed 
cannon on the roof of Fort Gunnybags. These defenses could have been raided readily by a strong force, but the show of ample defense 
seemingly attained the object "f the organization. The old stone building on the south side of Sacramento street, near Davis, was wiped mil 
by the big fire of 1900. 



M' 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



A GLIMPSE of SAN FRANCISCO 

in the EARLY 5 o's 

By Charles B. Turrill, 

Historian, Lincoln Grammar School Association; Member Advisory Committee, 

California Historical Survey Commission. 



WHAT manner of town was this, our San Francisco, 
seventy-five years ago? It is not the purpose of this 
article to sketch, even briefly, the great world-changes re- 
sulting from the discovery of gold in California, or the inter- 
esting circumstances of our city's growth prior to 1856. \\ e 
must place ourselves in the position of a newly arrived vis- 
itor from "the States," who has come hither on the then new 
sidewheel steamship "< )rizaba.' 

The little city was a strange looking place, with its well 
devised and constructed edifices, the equals of similar ones 
in hundred-vear-old cities of the Atlantic seaboard, and its 
hurriedly built structures of wood and sheet iron which 
adjoined them. 

True, the beginning of a settlement on the beautiful little 
Yerba Buena Cove had been made in 1836, when Jacob 
Primer Leese celebrated the completion of his home and 
warehouse and the American 4th of July (on Mexican soil) 
by hoisting the flag of the United States and inviting all 
the Mexican population for miles around the bay to his 
merry-making. The little hamlet that had grown around 
this nucleus was known as Yerba Buena. That name was 
in use even after Captain Montgomery, on July 8th, hoisted 
the flag of our country on the Plaza flag pole. In January, 
1X47, by ordinance the name of the ambitious settlement 
was officially changed from Yerba Buena to San Francisco. 

The topographical features of the northern end of the 
peninsula impressed all who came hither by steamer. For 
days they had caught occasional glimpses of an uninterest- 
ing Californian coast. They had been no more impressed 
with California's scenic beauties than had those earlier navi- 
gators of Spain. Like the prudent maiden. California does 
not display her charms to the casual passer, but saves and 
cherishes them for the expected lover. As the "Orizaba" 
neared her destined port, low headlands, at whose feet the 
waves broke in spray, were discerned. Wide expanses of 
yellowish drifting sands stretched inland, driven by the 
wind's action, and repeating the forms of the waves that 
had brought them to the shore. All were on deck as the 
steamer entered the Golden Gate. All eyes eagerly scanned 
the welcome shores of a new land of endeavor. The treeless 
slopes of the Presidio were grass covered in their gar- 
niture of green. Along the gulches low-growing oaks and 
lilacs in darker hue accentuated contour lines, while in open 
spaces lupin bushes were richly colored with early bloom. 
On slopes and in dell great splotches of red and yellow and 
blue wild-flower masses arrested the eye. On moister 
stretches masses of native iris grew. Slowly the "( (rizaba" 
passed the little settlement at North Beach, where Harry 
Meiggs had built his wdiarf. and where mail was sent ashore. 

Telegraph Hill arrested attention with its observatory 
maintained by the jewelers. Barrett & Sherwood, that they 
might accurately adjust the chronometers of captains who 
navigated waters not too thoroughly charted. The danger- 
ously eddying waters around Blossom Rock were not noticed 
by the passengers who eagerly looked upon the pretty cot- 
tages on the slopes of Telegraph Hill, among which was 
the home of the actor, Junius Brutus Booth, who was stage 
manager of the Metropolitan Theatre on Montgomery 
Street, near Washington. Years later his brother. Edwin, 
established bis reputation on the boards of a San Francisco 
playhouse. Quietly the steamer glided past North Point 
rounded Clarke's Point (near the present corner of Battery 



Street and Broadway), and disclosed a view of the city as 
she approached her wharf. 

( in the right was the mass of Telegraph Hill, and on the 
Uft kincon I lill. wdiere the homes of the Forbes. Griffith. 
Babcock and other prominent families formed the center of 
social life. Down nearer Rincon Point stood the recently 
completed handsome brick United States Marine Hospital, 
of which Dr. H. H. Toland, who later would found the "'Pol- 
and Medical College," was physican and surgeon. The little 
city nestled at the foot of high hills on whose eastern slopes 
strange looking houses clung like swallows' nests beneath 
the eaves of the barn "back home." Streets laid out at 
right angles to each other were in all conditions of "im- 
provement" from trail to thoroughfare. On these hills the 
scrub-oaks, similar to those nearer the Golden Gate, had 
disappeared before the fuel wants of earlier comers, and 
drifting" sand was quiescent only when the winds did not 
blow. The foreground of the picture was filled with ir- 
regularly constructed private wharves, mostly the exten- 
sions to deep water off streets which at their other ends 
wandered up over the hills and were lost. Along the sides 
of these wharves all manner of craft were fastened, dis- 
charging or taking on cargo. Some of these, like the "An- 
telope," had been ocean steamers, but recently converted 
into river boats similar to those then plying on the Hudson 
and Mississippi. In those days Captain Poole had no diffi- 
culty in reaching Sacramento in a deep sea ship. The 
snags and bars in the river were only incidents of the pas- 
sage. This "Antelope," witli her "state-room and sleeping 
accommodations for 150 cabin passengers," was but one of 
a considerable fleet of similar vessels by which the adven- 
turous traveler might reach Sacramento whence, from the 
Orleans Hotel I still standing), the California Stage Com- 
pany "run daily lines of coaches communicating with all 
the interior towns and mines." 

Out in the stream other craft were resting from their 
buffeting trip around Cape Horn and mustering courage 
and crews to again venture its gales. Within the line of 
pier heads were still other craft — a motley multitude of 
earlier arrivals — within whose confined cabins "gold 
seekers" had impatiently cursed the fate that had denied 
them passage in speedier craft, while they feared all Cali- 
fornia's golden store would be gathered ere their vessels 
reached the journey's end. Deserted by passengers and 
crews, these vessels, anchored in shallow water, were util- 
ized as store-ships when warehouses on shore were few. 
One had been bought by the municipality and fitted up as 
a jail. Others had served as foundations for saloons and 
hotels. All were connected with the wharves by plank 
walks, while gradually the space around them was "filled 
in" with sand from newly "graded" streets. Flimsy stores 
and houses bordered the sides of wharves at their shore- 
ward ends. In one of these, Charles P. Kimball, whose 
untiring industry and enterprise had given the little town 
its first City Directory, published before it was known 
here that California had become a State of the American 
Union, had established his "Noisy Carriers Book ami 
Stationery Co." Beneath these frail structures, at high tide, 
the waves swashed in rhythmic cadence. The passer-by 
knew when the tide was "out" through the sense of smell. 
Within the wharf area, wdiere Fremont and Beale streets 
(Continued on Page '1~ I 



September 5. 1925 DIAMOND JUBILEE EDITION 15 

"STEAMER DAY" at the POST OFFICE in the 



EARLY 5o'S 



GREAT crowds gathered to meet the incoming steamers, 
for they always carried, beside the letter mail, huge quan- 
tities of New York papers, which gave the local residents the 
news of the world at large. The New York agents of the 
twelve daily newspapers published in the city in 1853 sent out 
condensed batches of world-wide news all prepared for the 
publishers here, and there developed a keen rivalry among 
them to see which genius would get on the street first with this 
Eastern news. In the early '50's these Eastern papers arriv- 
ing by steamers were the sole source from which the city ob- 
tained outside world news. 




IOI nrF.SY OF JOHN IDVHI 



San Francisco Postoffice on "Steamer Day," in the Early 50 s 



In 1858 the Overland Stage Line between San Francisco 
and St. Louis was established. This overland line consumed 
21 days and made no reduction as compared with the regular 
steamer time, but it largely improved mail facilities. There 
were eight monthly arrivals by stage against two by steamer. 
The famous Pony Express was established in the same year 
between this city and St. Joseph, 1,800 miles. This service 
carried two mails per week, and the letters, written on fine 
tissue paper, were charged $5 each for every half ounce. This 
private correspondence overland contributed at times very im- 
portant information to the local newspapers. 

"Steamer day' was an institution, and developed a business 
s\stem unique in several particulars. It astonished visitors, 
and was the wonder of Eastern correspondents. The system 
arose from the isolated position that San Francisco occupied on 
the commercial map of the world. For all practical purposes. 
San Francisco in the late '40's and early '50's was on an island 
surrounded by a great ocean. It's only direct connection was 
with Xew York, via Panama, some 4,000 miles away by water. 
Once every fortnight, the beginning and middle of every month. 



the city at large passed through the feverish excitement of 
"steamer day." A week before the 1st and 16th of each month 
practically every resident prepared his mail for the outgoing 
steamer. Gold dust running into the millions was shipped 
East, some of it to the Philadelphia mint to be coined, and the 
remainder to extinguish debts. Letters, newspapers, business 
communications and like matter had to be prepared for 
"steamer day." The system dragged along and died of inani- 
tion in the '80's. 

In 1844 in Yerba Buena there were about a dozen houses 
and 50 people. In 1846 the Hudson Bay Co. sold their hold- 
ings and left, thus largely cutting down the number of 
settlers. But for some reason, the new site proved a magnet 
for nomads and sailors deserting vessels, and towards the 
close of 1846 there were some ninety buildings, shanties, 
adobes and frame houses, and about 200 inhabitants. By the 
end of April 1848, when the rush of residents to the gold 
fields began, the town had some 200 buildings, and the pop- 
ulation was nearly 1,000, practically all Americans and 
Europeans. Every day brought new arrivals. In January, 
1X47, the first printing press was established, and on the 
7th of the month the first paper, "The California 
Star," a weekly, was published, a small sheet of four 
pages, 15 inches by 12 inches. Sam Brannan was the owner. 
Trior to that issue "The Californian," also a weekly, had been 
established in Monterey as early as August 15, 1846, by Messrs. 
Colton and Semple. This was the first paper published on 
the Pacific Coast, March 20, 1847. "The California Star" 
changed its date lines from Yerba Buena to the new title of 
the city, San Francisco, January 30, 1847. a year before gold 
w as discovered. 



I^fjjfrj 


~~ 


it ^\ 1i I 




j f*< J ■ 1 C 1 tf l^ r 



. ■, ROBE.XT 0> 



From a drawing of the Lincoln Grammar School, by i: 
brated California artist. Amt-def .1 null in. at the as** "f twelve 
years, while he was a student at this school. 



16 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1025 



STORY of the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



I 



X THE later '50's, here in San Francisco, overland mail 

was carried by pony express across the continent to St. 
Louis. Consequently, 'only letter mail was carried because 
of the high cost, $5 per half ounce. 

In the earlier 'SO's, newspapers were all sent abroad via 
the Panama line of steamers to New York. That line furnishe 1 
the only comparatively fast time in news connection with 
the outs'ide world. Fred Marriott, Sr., had founded a number 
of papers, among them the present Illustrated London News. 
He was no novice in the publishing business. In looking over 
the field, he decided to furnish a publication that would ap- 
peal to the public on its merits and the extraordinary condi- 
tions regarding mail facilities then prevailing in the com- 
munity. He conceived the idea of publishing in digest form 
the news of the city and State, and at the same time fulfill 
all the essential requirements for its carriage throught the mads 
at the same rate as an ordinary letter. His novel idea and 
the form of his periodical was given the appropriate name 
of "The Xews Letter." 

The plant of the Xews Letter was destroyed by fire in April. 
1906; all the early files of the publication went up in smoke, 
and with them a large collection of priceless relics of pioneer 
days accumulated by the elder Marrio't. We are therefore in- 
debted to Mr. Barron, curator of the Museum in Golden Gate 
Park, for the privilege of photographing and reproducing from 
his files a copy of the Xews Letter dated October 20:h to No- 
vember 5, 1856. ( Facsimile on blue paper preceding title page 
in this issue. ) 

The first issue was published July 20. 1856. and was printed 
on a very thin, dull blue paper, the size of the present page. 
The first two pages were covered with the general new- of 
the day in short paragraphs and with advertisements. Some 
of the firms of that pioneer period are still in business in this 
city. The last two pages were left blank, so that the third 
page might be used for a letter and the fourth page for writing 
the address of any one abroad to whom the subscriber or pur- 
chaser might care to mail it. The idea was at once a hit with 
the community, and The Xews Letter, backed by its timely 
news and the personal news of its senders, was conspicuous 
in the outgoing mails of the regular steamers. Later The News 
Letter in its light and unique form of four pages, was readily 
carried by the Pony Express messengers across the plains. 

At that time there were no telegraph lines across the conti- 
nent. The only form of telegraphing in practical use was nil 
Telegraph Hill, where there was a station and a like station 
on a hill near the present Cliff 1 louse, facing the Pacific ( Icean. 
The look-out there had a strong telescope. When a vessel 
hove in sight he hoisted a flag on his station. The look-out on 
Telegraph Hill immediately hoisted a flag on his station. The 
merchants at the foot of the hill would see that flag and imme- 
diately prepare to go to the Post Office to get the mail brought 
them by the steamer. 

In 1865, on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, rioters 
attacked the newspapers that were against the franchising of 
the negro, and destroyed their plants. The mob looted num- 
bers of offices. Among these were the Examiner and News 
Letter. 

In 1875 the city and State was overrun with quack doctors; 
hundreds of men styled themselves doctors who had never 
studied medicine or attended a medical school. The Xews 
Letter forthright published a list of these men each week for 
over a year, and finally introduced a bill into the legislature to 
compel any one claiming to be a doctor to have a diploma from 
an accredited medical school. The live hundred quacks sub- 



scribed $100 each, and also had a bill introduced into the State 
legislature similar to that which the Xews Letter desired 
passed, but had added to it the clause "except men now prac- 
tising." The sack provided by them was big enough to pass 
their bill, but the notoriety given the quacks by the Xews Letter 
had reached even' part of the State, so that practically all the 
quacks had to retire. Following this campaign, the Xews Let- 
ter planned a campaign to expose trade frauds so as to prevent 
the adulteration of food and drink, short weights and meas- 
ures. Hundreds of articles of food and drink were analyzed. 
The analyses were published from week to week until Congress 
took the matter up and passed the bills now in force. 

In 1910 the Xews letter started a vigorous fight for good 
roads, and has consistently maintained it. The press through- 
out the State became intereste t, and through the suggestion of 
the Xews Letter no aspirant for the legislature would be sup- 
ported unless first pledged for good roads. With this move- 
ment was the start of the $18,000,000 bond issue, witli $15.- 
000,000 more in sight at our next election in November. 

The race tracks about the bay were for year- run in such an 
iniquitous manner that through the continued exposure in the 
News Letter of the dishonest practices of the management it 
was eventually closed. In this campaign, the proprietor of the 
X'ews Letter was nearly murdered for his endeavors. 

About the year 1922, the Xews Letter began a campaign to 
institute the "American Plan." among the Building Trades 
of San Francisco, and was instrumental in bringing about the 
operation of this plan, which has proved most beneficial for 
both employer and employee. 

The Xews Letter has been a kindergarten that has developed 
an unusual number of the brainiest and best known writer- on 
ihe Pacific Coast, writers that later developed national and. in 
many instances, international reputations. Among them were: 

James F. Bowman, Frank C. Cremony, Bret Harte. Samuel 
Clemens (Mark Twain i. \Y. T. Carleton, Ambrose B!erce, 
Frank M. Pixley. lame- T. Watkins, ( ionier Evans, 1). W. C. 
Nesfield, Frank II. Gassaway, T. A. Harcourt, R. E. White. 
Thomas J. Vivian, A. F. Balch, Mr-. Jos. Austin, Ashton Stev- 
ens. Hubert Henry Davies (the present dramatist). Wallace 
Irwin. Ed F. Moran, Stephen Ma-sett ("Jeems Pipes of Pipes- 
ville"), Rev. Win. S. Harvey, Harvey Brown, J. O. Ilara Cos- 
grove, John Finlay, Gertrude Atherton, Win. M. Neilson, P. X. 
Beringer, John Melville, Daniel O'Connell, Pete Bigelow, Fred 
Emerson Brooks, Jack London. Prank Norris, Sam Davis, 
Alice Ballard Rix, A. J. Waterhouse, Eliza D. Keith. Mrs. 
Kate Water-. John II. Gilmore, Adolphe Danziger, W. C. 
Morrow. 

Frank A Xankevel. the artist, got his first -tart on the Xews 
Letter. Later writers include: Eleanore F. Lewys-Ross, Aus- 
tin Lewis. Mrs. Josephine Wilson, Mrs. Katherine Schwartz, 
Mr. Richard C. Smith ("Mr. Blabbitt") and Fred Blair. 

Many interesting, noteworthy and historical illustrations 
have accompanied the Xews Letter in its issues from time to 
time since 1856. One of the most notable was "At the Play," 
accurately depicting three hundred men prominent in San Fran- 
cisco at that time. Nearly all are dead now, so that copies of 
the work are very valuable, although 30.000 copies were 
printed. The series of "Men We Know." which ran several 
years, set forth the traits and character of the prominent finan- 
ciers, professional and business men of that interesting perio I 
of commonwealth building. The series of "Artistic Homes" 
ran several years. This series had an extraordinary effect on 
people in the East, who had never seen San Francisco 



September 5. 192S 



DIAM< »ND JUBILEE EDITH iX 




F. Marriott, Sr. 




F. Marriott 




!. Marriott 



Bl IRN July 16, 1805, in Enfield, England, at the time of 
the epic sea-fight of Trafalgar, Frederick Marriott, 
Sr.. the founder of the News Letter, was also founder of 
the present Illustrated London News. Associated with him 
was George Augustus Sala. Mr. Marriott sold his interest 
for 500 pounds sterling, and joined the East India Company 
in Calcutta, lie came to San Francisco in 1850, and started 
the San Francisco News Letter in 18?(>. He died. Decem- 
ber 16, 1884, seventy-nine years of 



The late Frederick Marriott. Jr.. who published the San 
Francisco News Letter from December 16th, 1884, or 
from the time of his father's death, up to the tir-t of the 
present year, was born in San Francisco, April 4th. 1851, 
and died on January 11th. 1925, at which time the 
publication passed into the hands of his son. F. A. Marriott. 
the present owner and publisher of the San Francisco News 
Letter. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS FETTER 



September ?. 1925 



THE WHARF that TRANSFORMED the LIFE 

of HARRY MEIGGS 




The L'iiuj Wharf at Xorth Beach, Built by Harry Meiggs to get the Shipping Business of the City. The "L" lias Built Lati 



HARRYMEK ',< IS wasoneofthe biggest "hustlers" in San 
Francisco during the early '50's, a pioneer promoter of 
his da)'. He didn't overlook anything, and likemostmenof his 
day and generation he made his word good. He was forever 
pushing some enterprise. When he landed in the city in 1850 
all the vessels entering the Golden Gate anchored in Verba 
Buena cove at the foot of what was then Washington. Com- 
mercial and Jackson streets. Wharves were extended into 
the bay water there, and residents generally recognized that 
locality as the city's only shipping point. 1 tarry Meiggs had 
other ideas. A year or two later he boi imed Xorth Beach and 
built a road around the base of Telegraph Hill to Clarke's Point, 
on the north shore, where he had invested a pot of money in real 
estate. He ran out a wharf 2.000 feet long from the foot of 
Powell Street, graded and extended the streets in that quarter, 
and started a real estate boom. His object was to induce ship 
owners to make use of his facilities for their warehouses. He 
urged that his dock was closer to the Golden Gate, and its in- 
ducements superior to the old anchorage. He plunged heavily 
into debt in trying to swing this big scheme. 

Meiggs knew every game being played in the city, political, 
social, financial and otherwise. At that time street' work was 
paid for in warrants on the public treasury, signed by the Mayor 



and Controller. The Controller had fallen into the easy habit 
of signing entire books of blank warrants, and the Mayor, be- 
ing a good fellow, followed suit. Meiggs knew their system, 
and through a pliable subordinate got possession of one of these 
bonks properly signed for issue. 

There was no money in the street fund at the time, but that 
did not disconcert Meiggs. He knew that the money lenders 
of the town would bite at them, not knowing the situation, a 
sharp commentary on the way the city business was conducted. 
Before any one had an inkling. Meiggs had scattered enough 
warrants among money lenders to raise his monthly interest to 
$30,000. Meiggs was safely in flight when the storm broke. 
How much money he carried to Valparaiso, Chili, was never 
discovered. Meiggs later declared that he landed with only 
$8,000. He lost this in speculation, and had to pawn his watch. 

South America at that period proved a gold mine for a man 
of Meiggs' irrepressible and resourceful character. Eventually 
he accumulated a fortune estimated at nearly $100,000 by build- 
ing railroads in Peru and handling government contracts in 
adjacent countries. From his earnings he paid back every cent 
he owed his creditors in California. Eventually lie made over- 
tures to return here, but failed. 



September 5, 1925 



DIAMOND JUBILEE EDITION 



10 



THERE WERE AIR SHIPS in the 5 o's 




The First Cigar-shaped Blimp, " Avitor" 

Invented and built in, San Francisco by Frederick Marriott, Sr., in the early GO'S. 
Destroyed by fire in the Mechanics' Pavilion, where it was exhibited. 



San Francisco in 1856 had a long edge on Captain Ricken- 
backer in stirring up residents with a flying machine that 
came to town. An advertisement in the News Letter of 
October 6, 1856, sets forth : 

FLYING MACHINE,— Richardson's Dove Bat- 
tery, the only machine ever perfected for flying in 
the air, is on exhibition every evening at 131 Jack- 
son street (opposite Burch's Hotel) at which time 
the inventor will be happy to explain the same to 
the ladies and gentlemen of San Francisco. Ad- 
mission 50 cents." 

The then editor of this paper had familiarized himself 
with the various flying machines then being exploited in 
Fngland and on the Continent, and gave his judgment of 
the San Francisco flying machine as follows: 

"We were struck with the similarity of the principle, 
which corresponds with the machine patented by Mr. 
William Henson, in London, about eight years since, cre- 
ating at that time a great sensation. The arrangement of 
the detail is different, but similar in object, although there 
does not appear any borrowing of ideas from one to the 
other. The action of the tail of the fish and the bird's wing, 
is that of a screw and adds to the propulsion of the body, 
by its vigor and rapidity. The dove battery of Mr. Richard- 
son consists of two rigid planes (placed one over the other, 
about four feet apart), of glazed calico, with six sets of ex- 
tended gull's wings placed in front and behind the planes. 



and these wings are acted on simultaneously by cranks and 
levers, so as to produce the angle necessary for ascent or de- 
scent, striking the air at the same moment at the pleasure 
of the navigator, whose seat is in the center of the machine. 
The principle is the only one which can or will succeed, 
although we opine that a cylinder containing gas, com- 
posed of silk or cotton, will materially tend to coun eract 
gravitation. Should a small steam engine be found light 
and powerful enough, no further perfection of the machine 
is necessary. By running down an inclined plane, and 
holding a kite, you may be lifted off your feet; so in this 
machine, the pressure of the air, with the velocity obtained 
is the sustaining power. What is required to take the place of 
the rigid expanse of a bird's wing, is a couple of lightly framed 
Archimedian screws fixed at the back erf the planes, or extended 
wings, and these screws, driven by a small engine of one 
man or half horsepower ; the starting of the machine being 
first obtained by the velocity of an inclined plane, and then 
urged forward by the screws. Mr. Richardson intends in 
about three weeks having a private flight in the neighbor- 
hood of the North Beach, and we think he will be enabled 
to fly. Yet. his bird-shaped machine cannot be expected to 
be full-fledged at starting. As the principle of this inven- 
tion is the true one. we shall be glad to find Mr. Richard- 
son's visitors are so numerous, as will enable him properly 
to elaborate at the machine so novel, an invention possess- 
ing really the only correct principle by which aerial navi- 
gation can be accomplished." 




MYICttL PHOIO,.B*P1I — PHOTO SECTION NO. 15 — MR *EBVIIF. , . = . ,R«, 

The "Shenandoah" Over S. F. Bay — Golden Gate in Background — 1925 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, VJ2? 



The SAN FRANCISCO 
WATER FRONT in 1856 



i froncM ' 




The Water Front 
On northwest corner Broadway and Front street, before erection of Perry Building. 



September 5, 1925 



DIAMOND JUBILEE EDITION 
1894--I925 



21 




San Francisco Ferry Building, 1925, Showing Vehicular Subway on the Embarcadero 




Old Ferry Building, Prior to Commencement of Present Structure, in 1894 



21 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 5, 1925 



LIVELY INSURANCE EXPERIENCES in the BIG 

FIRES of the 50's 



OF peculiar interest to insurance men are the advertise- 
ments of the Royal Insurance Co., The Northern, The 
Imperial Fire and Life, and the Liverpool and London Fire 
appearing in the issue of San Francisco News Letter, Nov. 
5, 1856. The latter company was afterwards amalgamated 
with The Globe, and is still doing business as the Liver- 
pool & London & Globe, in California street. In 1856 the 
Liverpool and London was represented by J. I'. and R. J. 
Haven. The Imperial Fire and Life also shows a card 
in the 1856 issue. Falkner. Bell & Co. being the agents. 
Other companies having space in this issue were the North- 
ern Assurance. Smith Brothers & Co., agents, corner of 
California and Battery streets. This company's office is 
today at 330 California street, just 100 feet west from where 
il was in 18S6. The Royal was represented by McKinley, 
Garrioch & Co., California and Leidesdorff streets. Both 
companies have continuously operated in San Francisco 
since that date. The Royal operates with the Queen, now 
under the management of Rolia V. Watt, in its own splen- 
did building cornering on Sansome and Pine streets. 

To the Liverpool and London belongs the adventurous 
honor of having been first to offer reliable protection to 
the mercantile community of San Francisco. A year later, 
in 1X53. the Royal came on the scene. Two years later, in 
1X54. the Imperial Fire appeared in the city. The same 
year, the Monarch Fire opened offices here under the agency 
of William Lane Booker, at that time the British consul 
at this port. Two American companies, the Continental 
and the Home, both of New York, also placed agencies 
here, the Continental with C. Adolphe Low & Co., and the 
Home with Case, Heister & Co. 

Up to 1857 the companies heretofore named did the 
insurance business of the State. In that year, however, 
they were compelled to share the heretofore exclusive ter- 
ritory with the Hartford, the Phoenix, and the Merchants 
fire companies, all under the supervision of Edward Mc- 
Lean. The following year the New England Fire and 
Marine, Mr. Falkner agent, the Hamburg-Bremen. Morris 
Speyer. agent, the Aetna, E. H. Parker, agent, entered the 
field. These were the pioneers. 

The Pacific Coast has suffered from heavy conflagrations. 
The general prevalence of wood in construction brought 
with it heavy losses, and not until the lesson had been 
repeatedly learned were so-called fire-proof materials used, 
fire limits surveyed, and the provisions for protection rig- 
idly enforced. 

The most notable conflagration in San Francisco occurred 
in 1851, and involved a loss of something more than $6,000,- 
000. There were no insurance companies here at that time, 
and the losses were total. There were two other fires in 
the early days in this city, but the one named was by far 
the most serious. 

In 1852, Sacramento suffered a severe blow by the flames, 
which swept away about two-thirds of the buildings in the 
capital, and resulted in a property loss of S5.000.000. As in 
the case of San Francisco, no insurance was reported. 

The next great fire occurred in Virginia City on October 
2o, 1875, at which time five million dollars' worth of prop- 
erty was destroyed, with a heavy insurance amounting to 
over $2,500,000. This was the first great fire of the Pa- 
cific Coast by which fire insurance had suffered, and fell 
upon the forty-eight companies doing business in San 
Francisco. Local companies were seriously scorched by 
that conflagration, the losses of the six that had written 
business in the Nevada town footing up a total of $513,000. 

The Seattle conflagration that took place on the 6th day 
of June, 1889, was the second heavy loss on this coast that 



was suffered by insurance companies doing business in San 
Francisco. The total loss was the greatest ever sustained 
by any city west of Chicago, and it amounted to about $7,- 
000,000, covered by about $2,250,000 of insurance. The 
Seattle fire was caused by an overturned glue pot, as the 
Chicago fire originated in an overturned lamp. There has 
certainly been no clearer illustration on this coast outside 
of San Francisco of the remarkable recuperative power in 
a community, nor the complete changes wrought by fire, 
than in Seattle. When the flames were extinguished, but 
a single brick building remained. Everything was swept 
away. The debris was cleared up, and the council, in re- 
sponse to an indomitable public demand, extended the fire 
limits of the city practically over the entire area, some 
ninety acres, of the district burned out. Nothing but brick 
buildings of a substantial character were erected. The fire 
apparatus for the town was improved after the conflagra- 
tion, a paid department was established, and Seattle is as 
nearly a fire-proof city as can be found west of the Mis- 
sissippi River. 

On the 6th of August — just two months later — the busi- 
ness portion of the city of Spokane in Eastern Washington. 
was almost entirely destroyed by fire, the loss aggregating 
almost $6,000,000, with insurance of $2,500,000. The effect 
of the fire in Spokane was similar to the results in Seattle. 
From the ashes of the former city arose a beautiful and 
substantial town, with all the latest apparatus, paid de- 
partment, and as far as possible full protection against 
loss by fires. 

The experience of this city in the terrible conflagration of 
1906 is still too clear in the memory of San Franciscans to 
need retelling here. 

HIGH PRICES FOR THINGS IN '50 

In '50 the lid was off gambling. A half dollar was about 
the lowest coin in circulation. A copper, dime or 5c piece 
was a curio. For any small service nothing lower than 50c 
was given. Entrance to the pit in the circus was $3. Plain 
board $30 a week. A hearty meal cost from $2 to $5, ac- 
cording to quality of viands. Wheat flour was $40 a bbl. ; 
potatoes and brown sugar, 37j/ cents a pound : a small loaf 
of bread, 50c. Coarse boots were $30 to $40 per pair: 
superior boots were $100. Laborers received $1 per hour, 
and skilled mechanics from $12 to $20 per day. The car- 
penters struck because they were getting only $12 per day. 
and demanded $16. Every brick in a house was estimated 
at $1 to get in there in construction. Lumber was quoted 
at $500 per 1,000 feet. Rents were correspondingly enor- 
mous. Three thousand dollars per month was demanded 
for a store of very limited dimensions. The Parker House, 
comparatively small, brought its owners a rental of $120,- 
000 per year. Gamblers on the second floor contributed 
$60,000 of this amount. The Eldorado gambling house next 
door, a canvas tent of moderate size, earned $40,000 a year 
for its owners. Money was loaned at a rate ranging from. 
8 to 15 per cent per month on gilt edge security, and paid 
in advance. Real estate values advanced amazingly. Old 
50 vara lots, bought at $12 each, arose in value to thous- 
ands of dollars, some of them selling at $10,000 each. These 
lots laid the fortunes of manv millionaires. 



Captain and Commandante Jose Joaquin Moraga, who 
selected the sites and helped to found both the Presidio 
and the Mission Dolores on this peninsula in 1776. lies 
buried in the old Mission Dolores, where his dust still 
rests. He was the discoverer of the San Joaquin River, 
and was an impelling force in the foundation period of the' 
Spaniards in and around the bay of San Francisco. 



September 5, 1925 



DIAMOND JUBILEE EDITION 



23 



SAN FRANCISCO FACILITIES in the EARLY 50's 




Toll Gate, Bay and Junes Streets, 1864 



A BIG sand hill covered the middle of Market Street, 
from Kearny to Dupont, in the days of '50. Passen- 
gers went up Geary to Dupont, then to the edge of the 
sand hill on Market, where a milk wagon could just pass, 
leading to St. Anne's Valley. Large sand hills running east and 
west — between them St. Anne's Valley. 

Some of the water front streets had wharves. Many 
large vacant lots were filled with water from the bay. 

In 1856, residents were just beginning to build houses 
with bath-tubs. Most of the residents took their baths 
in barber shops. The famous What Cheer House on Sacra- 
mento street below Montgomery, was the only hotel with 
public bath tubs. They were in the basement, not in the 
rooms. 

Street lamps lighted the main streets in 1853. Whale 
oil and kerosene oil were used. The streets were largely 
paved with 4-inch planks 16 to 24 feet long. A few cobble- 
stone streets were very useful in winter, where the mud 
was in some places to the knees. Sidewalks were general 
ly of planks. Some few* brick and stone sidewalks. No 
cement sidewalks. 

The Western Addition in 1856 extended as far as Leaven- 
worth street. Beyond were milk ranches. 

Pacific street was the only one cut through. Jackson 
street and Washington street were not opened beyond Tay- 
lor street. 

Omnibuses provided carriage from North Beach to 
South Park, Street ear lines were then unknown. There 
were no cables or horse cars. 

A daily stage went to San Jose and way stations, 

The Embarcadero was at what is now Redwood City. In 
1856 there was only one house on the slough there. 

There were quite a number of private schools, as well 
as public schools, in 1856. 

Mission street, beyond Fourth and Fifth streets, was a 
toll road to the Mission. It was a plank road all the way. 

The Pioneer race track, a mile track, was beyond the Mission. 
Many vacant lots were in the vicinity, covered with beau- 
tiful wild flowers. 

Large water wagons furnished water to houses. Each 
house had a barrel in the kitchen to be filled. 

Few houses were piped for either gas or water. 

Parlors had large chandeliers with two or three rows of 
glass prisms, containing wax candles. 



Whale oil was generally burned. Large candles in high 
silver candlesticks were used in bedrooms. 

Steamboats ran to Sacramento and vicinity. 

The Democratic party was everywhere in power. 

Fire engines were hauled by men, with long ropes ; there 
were one hundred men on each side and brakes were worked 
by men on each side of engine. 

There were no elevators in buildings. 

Quite a number of Mexican adobe houses were still in 
existence in San Francisco, particularly at the Mission Do- 
lores. 

The Willows and Nightingale House, at Sixteenth street 
and beyond, were places of resort. 

Correspondence was largely through Wells-Fargo envel- 
opes, 10 cents each. 

Newspapers consisted of blanket sheets of four pages. 
There was no overland telegraph. 

Steamers sailed once in thirty days from New York, by 
way of Panama. 

Clipper ships carrying freight arrived via Cape Horn 
in ninety days — considered a quick trip. 

Local banks used scales to buy gold dust. 

A pinch of gold dust paid for a pie at a bakery. 

There was a hack stand around the Plaza, where hacks 
could be hired. 

San Francisco's population was about 30,000 in 1856. 

Photographs were practically unknown. Daguerreotypes 
were taken of individuals and localities. 

No stationary wash stands in the San Francisco houses. 
A wash stand with a bowl and pitcher furnished personal 
washing facilities. 

Gentlemen generally dressed in silk hats called "beavers," 
and wore boots and long Prince Albert coats. Ladies wore 
hoops. 

The extension of Commercial street into the bay was 
called "Long Wharf." where passengers were landed in 
lioats from incoming vessels. 

The County of San Francisco extended to San Francis- 
quita Creek, until June 11, 1856, when the city and county 
of San Francisco was formed, extending to the southern 
end of Lake Merced, and south of that a new county was 
formed called San Mateo County, out of the remainder of 
the County of San Francisco. 




• ill «TE>\ O, n. m. IMIMI 



The Golden Gate and Xorth Beaeh from Telegraph 
Hill— Early 6(Vs 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



PANORAMA of SAN 
from RUSSI 



tf"5 




VIEW PROM RUSSIAN HIM.. LOOKING WEST. — I. Point Lotos Telegraph. 2. Innfr Telegraph Station. 8. Presidio. 1. Golden 

Gate. 5. Fort Point, "i. Sandy Point. 7. I't. Bonita Light. B. Point niablo. 9. Lime Point, hi. i',i n street. 11. s. V. City Watei 

Works. 12. Leavenworth Street 14. Lombard Street. 15. Greenwich street, 16. Filbert Street IT. Union Street. 18. Tamalpais, Marin 
County. 19. Sausalito. 20. Greenwich street School. 




LOOKING EAST. — 41. Greenwich Street. 42. Filbert street. 1". iMiponl Street. 14. Washington Square. I r. . Powell street. Hi. Stock- 
ton Street. 4,. Union Street. IS. Telegraph Mill (294 feet). 49. Green Street. 50. Union Street School. 51. Verba Buena. or Goat Island. 
..-' .Mount Diablo. 53. St. Francis Church. 51. Vallejo St. Wharf. 55. Vallejo Street. 56. Broadway Wharf. 57. Oakland (Alameda 
County). 58. Jackson St.